Скачать презентацию Your Sculpture project involves the following Produce 3 Скачать презентацию Your Sculpture project involves the following Produce 3

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Your Sculpture project involves the following: Produce 3 sculpture compositions, each one with a Your Sculpture project involves the following: Produce 3 sculpture compositions, each one with a different medium (e. g. pencil/ paint/ oil pastel/ chalk pastel etc. ) Each one must have a different theme – • One with an imaginary background that illustrates what you think, and the sculptor thinks, the sculpture is about • One with a background that reflects Port Talbot – industry/ history/ landscape – superimpose your sculpture drawing into the background. • A close up of part of the sculpture. This means it must be completed in great detail, with little room for a background although this could be abstract in nature. • Produce three reviews, each one based on the sculpture and sculptor you have chosen. This must be at least A 4 in size, decorated, possibly word processed and containing three paragraphs of carefully written work – one about the sculptor, one about the sculpture, and a bigger one explaining why you chose the sculpture and what it means to you and how it has influenced your design and make of your own sculpture. • Produce a design sheet (A 3 mimimum) for your own sculpture. You must design and make a 3 D art work either based on one you have seen in Margam Park or an original idea of your own • The sculpture can be small (detailed) or large (less detailed) and made from any materials such as cardboard, wire, plastic, found etc. It should be done as homework throughout the term but can be worked on in school – with painting/ glueing etc. Photographs should be taken of its progress, and notes made about its construction and development. • At the end of term you will be making a painting based on your sculpture, adding a suitable, imaginary background.

MARGAM SCULPTURE “The Shout” by Glynn Williams http: //www. glynnwilliams. co. uk/ Carved from MARGAM SCULPTURE “The Shout” by Glynn Williams http: //www. glynnwilliams. co. uk/ Carved from Ancaster Stone Nationality – Welsh Glynn Williams began his artistic career under the teaching of Tom Wright in Wolverhampton College of Art, in the late 1950’s. Peter Fuller, an art critic of the time, described William’s early work as that produced by a sculptor “born a virtuoso carver, one of those rare individuals who can cut, chisel and find convincing sculptural forms with such facility that he is barely aware that he is gifted”. William’s favourite medium for sculpting is stone, and almost all his large output of work is carved out of this medium. Glynn Williams is now sculpture professor at the Royal College of Art in London. Glynn Williams had many sculptures exhibited in Margam Park, two of which remain there today. One is “The Shout”, a large sculpture made out of ancaster stone, which was produced in 1982. It was placed in a more prominent position in the deer park during William’s retrospective exhibition in 1992. The previous siting overlooked the entrance and Orangery car park, and was in a relatively bleak area, possibly a little more in keeping with the message Williams was trying to get across. The sculpture now is to be found inside the Orangery gardens in a relatively hidden spot under sheltering trees. It shows William’s slightly abstract, chiselled surface, and is roughly life size. The decision to move the sculpture from its original more prominent position was made in response to comments from members of the public unsettled by its grim message. The sculpture itself features a mother cradling the lifeless body of her baby. Originally, Williams intended a crucifix shape for the sculpture and a slightly different message. During construction the shape and ultimate message changed. The face of the Mother is contorted into a wide mouthed scream as she suffers the pain of the death of her child. The sculpture therefore is about the futility of war, the abandonment of normality, the suffering of innocent victims. The mother seems to be shouting to the World “Why did this have to happen!”

The Shout – Glynn Williams As well as producing a composition and imaginative background The Shout – Glynn Williams As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Rubgy Temple” by Aaron Ross Carved from fallen oaks Nationality – Welsh This is “Rubgy Temple” by Aaron Ross Carved from fallen oaks Nationality – Welsh This is one of a set of three sculptures to be found outside the Orangery on the extensive gardens. The three wooden structures, each measuring roughly six feet tall, were carved out of felled oak trees from the Park grounds, and represent totem poles or temple structures associated with bygone civilisations. Very often those civilisations would record events from their contemporary society by carving them into wooden structures, and trees in particular, which would either be free standing or part of a more elaborate construction. Arran Ross has done something similar with his “Rugby Temple”, recording a moment of Welsh contemporary culture, and the scenarios associated with that culture. It is without doubt that rugby plays a very important part in Welsh society today, and the advent of televised International rugby matches means that virtually every Welsh person can be exposed to the passion and spectacle of our “National” game. To say that rugby is a religion would be stretching the point too far, apart from being sacrilegious, but Aaron Ross is making the point with his rugby temple how the game is perceived today in Wales, and how important a part of our culture it is. Ross has included other aspects of Welsh life including industry and religion.

Rugby Temples – Aaron Ross As well as producing a composition and imaginative background Rugby Temples – Aaron Ross As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Still Life in a Window” by Fred Watson http: //www. fredwatsonsculpture. com/ Carved from “Still Life in a Window” by Fred Watson http: //www. fredwatsonsculpture. com/ Carved from Ancaster Stone Nationality – English He is a stone carver, and he was particularly pleased to be able to work in Margam Park because of its associations with traditional craftsmen and stone masons. The Castle, the Orangery and the nearby Abbey all have fine examples of the stone carver’s art, almost all from previous centuries before the introduction of modern day technology and equipment. Fred Watson was given a commission to produce a sculpture that combined a modern idea with traditional techniques, and “Still life in a Window” was the result. He has used a large block of stone and chiselled out his art work very carefully and with a skilled use of tools and an understanding of the material he is working with. It resembles a window to a certain extent, with part of the fame showing and the window sill. It appears that standing on this sill are two bottles and a round vase. These have been carefully crafted and their texture is smooth and rounded. The vertical part of the window has been finely textured in a pattern that resembles some of the stone work on the outside of the Orangery. Maybe the artist was inspired by this example of previous stone work. It is placed just inside the wall of the Orangery, and is virtually the first sculpture you see as you enter the Orangery gardens. It is placed on the ground, so that one’s viewing angle is down.

Still Life in a Window – Fred Watson As well as producing a composition Still Life in a Window – Fred Watson As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Rhiannon” by David Peterson http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/southwest/sites/culture/pages/davidpetersen. shtml Made from preformed steel “Rhiannon” by David Peterson http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/southwest/sites/culture/pages/davidpetersen. shtml Made from preformed steel Nationality – Welsh David Peterson is a famous Welsh sculptor with a positive attitude to the World. He is a blacksmith, an artist and a craftsman, and his abiding passion other than Wales is working with metal. He worked as a lecturer at the Camarthen College of art where he passed on his skills and knowledge of working with metal. Recently, he has been working with his sons on various projects, all of which have a relationship with Wales, its myths and legends. One of his most recent sculptures was the intricate metal receptacle for the burning millennium flame of Wales. The sculpture in Margam was completed in 1992 for the Margam Sculpture Exhibition, and was one of four sculptures depicting Welsh mythology figures. “Rhiannon” depicts a Welsh Celtic Princess caught up in the struggle with their English counterparts. It is a tall sculpture made entirely of metal and shows Peterson’s expertise and familiarity with the medium. The steel sculpture has been sprayed with earthy colours, in keeping with its natural surroundings. Peterson used the bucket from a JCB to form part of his impressive sculpture.

Rhiannon – David Peterson As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of Rhiannon – David Peterson As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

Homage to Chernobyl – Paul Kincaid As well as producing a composition and imaginative Homage to Chernobyl – Paul Kincaid As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Homage to Chernobyl” by Paul Bothwell Kincaid Carved from red sandstone Nationality - Welsh “Homage to Chernobyl” by Paul Bothwell Kincaid Carved from red sandstone Nationality - Welsh In 1985 a nuclear reactor exploded in Chernobyl in Russia with devastating results. A poisonous cloud of radioactive gas poured out into the surrounding town and countryside and eventually drifted as far as North Wales. The human and environmental damage from this fall out was enormous, and still has consequences for all who came in to contact with the deadly radioactive gas. The sculpture shows in its form how the radioactivity has changed lives and environments, emanating from the reactor core. In its position in the Park it is a stark reminder to all of us that we must nurture and cherish our natural environment otherwise it will become unrecognisable and untenable. The broken arches and remnants of the Abbey such as the Chapter House are a metaphor for decay and neglect and how we need to cherish and nurture our environment as well as improve and modernise.

White Cloud – Alain Ayres As well as producing a composition and imaginative background White Cloud – Alain Ayres As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“White Cloud” by Alain Ayres http: //alainayers. files. wordpress. com/2012/01/alain-ayers-2012 cv. pdf http: //www. “White Cloud” by Alain Ayres http: //alainayers. files. wordpress. com/2012/01/alain-ayers-2012 cv. pdf http: //www. geograph. org. uk/photo/2972347 Carved from Ancaster Stone Nationality – English This sculpture is to be found in the garden alongside the impressive walkway leading up to the Castle steps. “White Cloud” is a stone sculpture, carved from two tons of Portland Stone. It was made in 1989 when Ayres was working as an artist in residence in Margam Park, his work being added to the impressive list of sculptures then displayed in the Park. One of the sculptures then on display was a bronze work by Henry Moore, and this sculpture has elements of that work contained in it. The form is based on an abstracted cloud, also containing references to human and animal forms. The light coloured stone contrasts with the greenery of its location, and the implications of its form complement the natural and animal scenarios to be found in the Park.

Praying Man – Adelchi Gorno As well as producing a composition and imaginative background Praying Man – Adelchi Gorno As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Praying Man” by Adelchi Gorno Carved from oak in 1986 Nationality – Italian Adelchi “Praying Man” by Adelchi Gorno Carved from oak in 1986 Nationality – Italian Adelchi Gorno is unusual amongst the list of sculptors in the Park as she is also a nun. Her creative abilities have been very well expressed in her sculpture of a praying man. The form was sculpted from a fallen oak from the Park using a chainsaw and hammer and chisel, and it certainly creates an image of sincerity and the power of prayer. In its isolated setting it evokes the feeling of solitude that sometimes accompanies prayer, and it certainly complements its beautiful natural setting. Unfortunately, the sculpture has suffered some damage over the years and now rests horizontally, minus its head, bur still evoking peace and calm in its forest setting

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

By Sean Kehoe http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/southwest/sites/haverfordwest/pages/sean_kehoe. shtml Carved from oak 1990 Nationality By Sean Kehoe http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/southwest/sites/haverfordwest/pages/sean_kehoe. shtml Carved from oak 1990 Nationality - Welsh Sean Kehoe was an art teacher at St. Josephs Comprehensive School in Port Talbot, as well as being a sculptor who is beginning to make a name for himself. Sean likes to work with wood, using a hammer and chisel to bring to life thoughts of his fertile imagination. Sean has several examples of his work on display in Margam Park, the biggest being his “Millennium Gnome”. For the woodland trail, Sean used theme of the ‘Mabinogion’ http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/history/sites/themes/society/myths_mabinogion. shtml to turn the experience into a mystical kingdom. A once overgrown area of the Park, near to the main entrance, now has a walkway through woodland, passing the aviaries that house a collection of owls and buzzards. The wood carvings feature images from the Mabinogion, the Welsh books of myth and legend, as well as fairy tales and mystical stories. One of the sculptures features a panel containing scurrying rats making their way out of the cave before the rising waters engulf them. Sean uses wood stain dyes to add colour to some of his work, but always in keeping with the surroundings. The following sculptures, ‘Dragon Head’, ‘Screaming Face’, Wizard Head’, ‘Celtic Column’ and ‘Owl Head’ are all Sean’s interpretations of his thoughts of creatures from the Mabingion. Sadly, some of Sean’s sculptures are slowly disintegrating and one, ‘Millennium Gnome’ has completely disappeared.

OWL HEAD OWL HEAD

DRAGON HEAD DRAGON HEAD

Screaming Face Screaming Face

WIZARD HEAD CELTIC COLUMN WIZARD HEAD CELTIC COLUMN

“Immortal Portal” by Vic Brailsford http: //vicbrailsford. com/ Carved from oak Nationality – Welsh “Immortal Portal” by Vic Brailsford http: //vicbrailsford. com/ Carved from oak Nationality – Welsh This particular sculpture has been in the Park since 1996 when the Japanese Garden was developed. The sculpture forms two almost identical parts, which stand either side of the entrance to the Garden. The abstract forms represent two trees, guarding the entrance. The top half of the sculpture has been carefully carved to give impressions of the leaves while the lower half forms the trunk of the portals. Obviously little work was needed here, as they are originally trees from the Park. The portals have recently been moved to a new location in the Park in the Orangery gardens.

Immortal Portals – Victoria Brailsford As well as producing a composition and imaginative background Immortal Portals – Victoria Brailsford As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Wishing Stone”” by Paul Williams http: //paulwilliams. artparks. co. uk/artpark_sculpture_sculptor_details. php? artist. ID=89&sculptor=p aul_williams “Wishing Stone”” by Paul Williams http: //paulwilliams. artparks. co. uk/artpark_sculpture_sculptor_details. php? artist. ID=89&sculptor=p aul_williams Made from Ancaster stone Nationality – English Paul Williams is a sculptor who works in a variety of materials, but one who really enjoys working in stone. His sculpture “Wishing Stone”, is made from three blocks of cream Ancaster stone. One possible interpretation of this sculpture is that it represents a female form, possibly Emily Talbot, representing the female fight for equality at the time Lady Talbot was alive. The strained features and defiant pose gives an impression of great strength, demonstrating the difficult position females found themselves in at this time in terms of their role in society. Lady Talbot had to take on the full responsibility of running Margam Estate during her lifetime and this must have been a great responsibility. The sculpture has suffered from weathering and staining from lichen, but still remains a strong and impressive sculptural form. It is situated in the Orangery gardens.

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme? Wishing Stone – Paul Williams

“Pebble Leaf” by Paul Mason http: //paulwilliammason. blogspot. co. uk/ Carved from Ancaster Stone “Pebble Leaf” by Paul Mason http: //paulwilliammason. blogspot. co. uk/ Carved from Ancaster Stone Nationality - English Paul Mason is essentially a carver but he has exhibited drawings and paintings as well as a variety of 3–dimensional material. His exhibit “Pebble Leaf” is carved from one large block of Ancaster stone, and demonstrates his ability as a carver. The piece includes a variety of textures, roughly hewn below, but much smoother and detailed above. The form and shape of the sculpture contains elements of pebbles, but the detail certainly contains references of natural forms with its spans of veins and leaf shapes. The sculpture rests as does its natural inspirations, on the grass outside the Orangery, except that no storm is going to blow this away!

Pebble Leaf – Paul Mason As well as producing a composition and imaginative background Pebble Leaf – Paul Mason As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Scene of the Deluge” by Matthieu Kessells 1784 - 1836 http: //www. answers. com/topic/mathieu-kessels-1 “Scene of the Deluge” by Matthieu Kessells 1784 - 1836 http: //www. answers. com/topic/mathieu-kessels-1 Carved from Alabaster marble Inside the Orangery (Originally inside the Castle) Nationality – German This sculpture is to be found inside the Orangery itself, and is what many people would consider to be a “traditional” sculpture. It was made by a German sculptor named Matthieu Kessells, as a gift for Thomas Mansel Talbot in 1817. At this time the Mansel – Talbot family were accumulating works of art, and sculptures in particular, to adorn the rooms and hallways of Margam Castle. They were an extremely wealthy family, and acquired works of art from all corners of the World. It is a reasonable assumption to think that they would have been very much in favour of setting up the Sculpture Park in Margam Park in the early 1990’s, when exhibits from some of the most famous contemporary sculptors such as Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Glynn Williams, Robert Thomas and Elizabeth Frink were on show. “The Scene of the Deluge” is a large sculpture. The three figures contained within it are almost life size. The approximate size of the whole sculpture would be about twelve feet. The sculpture is made from white alabaster, a hard, white, chalky substance, used to recreate the effect of much more expensive marble. The surface of the figures are very smooth, and the whole sculpture has obviously been delicately sculpted. The figures are very realistic, well proportioned, and carved in great detail. It is situated in the Orangery, and although this was not its original site (that was in the hallway of the castle itself), its present position is very suitable. The large airy Orangery complements the statue, the natural sunlight streaming through the large windows highlight the lifelike features delicate folds of material with light and shade. The theme of the statue is the “Scene of the Deluge”, a religious parody, showing an emotional fight for survival. If you view the sculpture from different angles you will see three different “death grips”, all relating to survival. Kessells expresses the pain and effort of survival, each figure desperately clings on to each other and life itself. The main grip is that of the man, who looks over the woman and baby as they grasp each other. If his grip should fail, then the woman and baby would perish. The woman has a grip around the man’s ankle, and a desperate grip of the baby. The baby clings to its mother, pulling at the cloth of her dress. This sculpture might even today be a parody of the eventual fate of the Talbot family, as the death of Lady Emily Talbot at the beginning of this century meant that the Talbot family no longer existed as she was the last remaining family member, had not married and had no children.

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme? The Scene of the Deluge - Matthieu Kessells

“Untitled” by Nicholas Pope Made from lime and stone Nationality – Welsh The sculptor “Untitled” by Nicholas Pope Made from lime and stone Nationality – Welsh The sculptor John Maine created this stone sculpture in 1988, and it was one of the first sculptures to be exhibited in Margam Park during its time as one of the three most important sculpture Parks in Britain. It has been in the Park ever since, and has been in its present position for over eight years. During this time it has been ravaged by the elements, but has retained its original shape and texture remarkably well. The sculpture is made from Portland stone and limestone, which in its original condition is a yellowy white colour. It is quite large, about five foot tall, and about six foot wide. It is made in two sections, the top one resting on the larger bottom one, and is to be found between the Orangery and Fairy tale land in an area of shrubland. The sculptor has spent a considerable amount of time and effort fashioning the two sections of the sculpture and has managed to create a very smooth surface texture. Even to the touch today the surface is incredibly smooth, and the two sections seem perfectly matched, fitting into each other like a human joint. Other people have suggested that the stones look like clouds, while some have been unable to see anything there at all which might give some indication to the creator’s name for his sculpture. Even if it does not actually represent anything, then it is an excellent piece of stone work in its own right. The artist has used his skills expertly with pieces of stone that are very heavy , and yet look light in their sculpted form. The sculpture has also begun to camouflage itself into the surroundings as it has been covered with an algae that has coloured it in shades of green and yellow.

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme? ‘Untitled’ by Nicholas Pope

“Untitled” by Nicholas Pope http: //www. richardsaltoun. com/nicholas-pope-biography/ Made from lime and stone Nationality “Untitled” by Nicholas Pope http: //www. richardsaltoun. com/nicholas-pope-biography/ Made from lime and stone Nationality – Welsh The sculptor John Maine created this stone sculpture in 1988, and it was one of the first sculptures to be exhibited in Margam Park during its time as one of the three most important sculpture Parks in Britain. It has been in the Park ever since, and has been in its present position for over eight years. During this time it has been ravaged by the elements, but has retained its original shape and texture remarkably well. The sculpture is made from Portland stone and limestone, which in its original condition is a yellowy white colour. It is quite large, about five foot tall, and about six foot wide. It is made in two sections, the top one resting on the larger bottom one, and is to be found between the Orangery and Fairy tale land in an area of shrubland. The sculptor has spent a considerable amount of time and effort fashioning the two sections of the sculpture and has managed to create a very smooth surface texture. Even to the touch today the surface is incredibly smooth, and the two sections seem perfectly matched, fitting into each other like a human joint. Other people have suggested that the stones look like clouds, while some have been unable to see anything there at all which might give some indication to the creator’s name for his sculpture. Even if it does not actually represent anything, then it is an excellent piece of stone work in its own right. The artist has used his skills expertly with pieces of stone that are very heavy , and yet look light in their sculpted form. The sculpture has also begun to camouflage itself into the surroundings as it has been covered with an algae that has coloured it in shades of green and yellow.

DEER SLOT By Christine Angus As well as producing a composition and imaginative background DEER SLOT By Christine Angus As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“Deer Slot” by Christine Angus Carved from Lancaster Stone Nationality – Scottish Christine Angus “Deer Slot” by Christine Angus Carved from Lancaster Stone Nationality – Scottish Christine Angus was a sculptor in residence in Margam Park in 1998. She was a stone carver and produced several pieces of work, which were very much influenced by the natural environment of the Country Park. Christine was particularly interested in the deer herds and the imprints they left behind in the soft ground. Her sculpture, “Deer slot” contains references to the hooves of the animals and the imprints or “slots” they leave behind as evidence of their presence. Christine’s sculpture is to be found on the lawns of the Castle where at one time the real deer slots would have been found

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme? Finger Maze By Phillip Chatfield

“Finger Maze” by Phillip Chatfield http: //www. ourladyoftintern. co. uk/sculptor. htm Carved Ancaster Stone “Finger Maze” by Phillip Chatfield http: //www. ourladyoftintern. co. uk/sculptor. htm Carved Ancaster Stone Nationality – English Phillip Chatfield was employed as a sculptor in residence in Margam Park. He is a stone carver and produced this piece originally to be sited in the centre of the impressive the hedge maze. This feature of the Park has now gone, and a decision was made to re-site in its present position just in front of the Castle. The sculpture has references to some of the grave-stones to be found in the Abbey grounds, and contains some interesting relief images around the edges of the sculpture.

The Shepherd by Richard Lawrence As well as producing a composition and imaginative background The Shepherd by Richard Lawrence As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme?

“The Shepherd” by Richard Lawrence http: //www. lawrencesculptor. co. uk/ Carved from oak Nationality “The Shepherd” by Richard Lawrence http: //www. lawrencesculptor. co. uk/ Carved from oak Nationality - English Richard Laurence is an English artist from London who specialises in working in wood. He has exhibited several of his sculptures at the Margam Sculpture Park, and all of them have used wood originally from the Park. In 1990 terrific storms swept the country and thousands of mature trees were knocked over by the high winds. In Margam Park a considerable number of old trees were felled, and it was timber from some of these that Richard Laurence made the Shepherd. He used a chain saw to cut the initial piece of felled oak into a seven foot stump weighing one and a half tons, and then chisels and smaller saws to produce the finished work. The sculpture now stands in a small woodland near the trout lake and lawn at the rear of the castle. Richard Lawrence likes to think of his sculpture as a symbolic “weather watcher”, aimed at reminding people that they have to keep one eye firmly on the changing skies. In total, the high winds of 1990 cost the West Glamorgan County Council more than one million pounds, so the sculpture remains as a symbol of that terrible time.

As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have As well as producing a composition and imaginative background of the sculpture you have chosen, you must design a page containing a written review of the sculpture you have chosen. This must contain at least three paragraphs that fill an A 4 page. The first paragraph will be about the sculptor, the second paragraph about the sculpture and the final paragraph about your thoughts and feelings about the sculptor and sculpture and how you can link it to the sculpture you are making. Your page can be word processed or written out by hand, contain an image in the form of a representation of the sculpture which the writing flows around or perhaps forms a background to the writing as a watermark or light pencil sketch. It must have a distinctive title chosen to represent theme of the sculpture and a border perhaps containing repeated images of part of the sculpture. The review must be placed alongside your finished composition on a black presentation sheet. Use the writing frame below to help you, but ALWAYS use your own words and interpretations. Information about the sculptors and sculptures can be found in the Margam Park sculpture booklets as well as on the school website, and individual websites of the sculptors. If you wanted particular questions answered, or perhaps advice about your own sculpture, you could email the sculptors, and include any replies in your sketchbook as part of your research. My project brief this term is to design and make a sculpture of my own that is inspired by my passions and interests. To find out more about sculpture, I have studied examples in my own town. I went to Margam Park where I looked at the work of (name of sculptor). . . nationality, lives in, works in, previous work, material works in, other works in the Park, (check out any websites). The sculpture itself, (name), location in the Park, size, parts, made of. . . wood, stone, metal, bronze, etc. put together by. . . , find out about the process, colour, stain, weathering, abstract, realistic, figurative, shape, form, scale, texture, heavy, light. Own thoughts and feelings – you have chosen it as one of your sculptures to study so you must have some thoughts on the subject – your interpretation of what the sculptor/ artist was trying to say, other peoples views and thoughts, reflections, thoughts on location – where else could it be located? How could you make a link to the sculpture you are making – discuss feelings/ passions/ nationality etc? What materials have you chosen to add dynamism and life to your composition? Why have you chosen a specific background to use? What is the link to the sculptures theme? HELMET by Moelwyn Merchant

“HELMET” by Moelwyn Merchant http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Moelwyn_Merchant Flat sand cast iron (See cast “HELMET” by Moelwyn Merchant http: //en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Moelwyn_Merchant Flat sand cast iron (See cast iron mould sculpture making method below) Nationality – Welsh (born in Port Talbot) This is a sculpture by the Port Talbot artist, Moelwyn Merchant. He died in 1997 at the age of 73, and had spent his life producing works of art that are now on display in many parts of the World. He worked primarily in bronze, casting his sculptures from clay models that he produced in his studio. He also worked in steel, an abundant raw material in his native town. Moelwyn Merchant was inspired by the many myths and legends that abounded in this locality, and spent many hours researching into his studies. This particular sculpture has its origins in some of the legends surrounding animals that were supposed to inhabit the countryside around Margam, and many of the stories come from Celtic roots. The sculpture is made of cast iron, and stands over six foot tall. Its position is between the rear of the Orangery and in the shadow of Margam Abbey, standing on a small promontory. Merchant has textured the surface in various ways. Some parts are smooth while others are quite rough to the touch. Some parts are quite angular while others are more abstract. The whole image gives the impression of some sort of plumed bird, the body section being quite thin. The sculpture itself is quite thin, and has been painted jet black with a glossy coat, perhaps to protect it from the elements, or perhaps related to its historic theme. The sculpture commands attention as one walks through the orangery gardens. There is something about it that makes one want to explore the surfaces and textures in more detail, and its abstract nature allows one’s imagination to run wild over possible explanations

Cast Iron Mould sculpture Cast Iron Mould sculpture

KITE TAIL by Andrew Rowe KITE TAIL by Andrew Rowe

Andrew Rowe http: //www. dar-design. com/ http: //www. flickr. com/photos/23648148@N 03/sets/72157611374770854/detail/ http: //www. npt. Andrew Rowe http: //www. dar-design. com/ http: //www. flickr. com/photos/[email protected] 03/sets/72157611374770854/detail/ http: //www. npt. gov. uk/default. aspx? page=2482&pr_id=2691 Aberafan Seafront Markers - Kite Tail and Taper 2008) In conjunction with Neath Port Talbot and The Arts Council of Wales, Safle commissioned Welsh Artist Andrew Rowe to design and make the Aberafan Seafront Markers. Two dramatic steel sculptures installed on the seafront at Aberafan, Port Talbot forms part of the regeneration programme for Aberafan Seafront and have been jointly funded by Neath Port Talbot Council, the Arts Council of Wales and Welsh Assembly Government. The ‘Kite Tail’ sculpture is the largest single piece of artwork to be installed in Wales and is 42 -foot-high and 17 tonnes in weight. Welsh Artist Andrew Rowe won the commission in a competition with over 40 applicants from around the UK and internationally. The two sculptures were both inspired by the ribbon of a kite but are contrasting in design. The ‘Kite Tail’ loops through itself and is one continuous band of steel. They will also be lit at night. Andrew Rowe said “I’m incredibly proud of this achievement. The design and construction have been an immense challenge but I am delighted with the result. The work effectively entails keeping approximately 17 tonnes of flowing steel forms aloft with seemingly very little contact with the ground. It was inspired by seeing families flying kites on the long, windy stretch of sand that in Aberafan Beach. ” Wiard Sterk, Executive Director of Safle said: “The Installation of this imaginative public work of art is a tremendous achievement. It is the result of great creativity and originality mixed with a fabulous feat of engineering. ” Andrew Rowe commissioned Alan Dawson to engineer and fabricate the artwork. The model created by Andrew was scanned and the engineering calculations proved out to be the most complicated problem ever solved by Alan Dawson.

MORTAL COIL by Sebastien Boyeson MORTAL COIL by Sebastien Boyeson

Sebastien Boyesen http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/arts/galleries/sebastien-boyesen-sculptures/ http: //sebboyesen. wix. com/seb-boyesen-test-site 2 https: //www. Sebastien Boyesen http: //www. bbc. co. uk/wales/arts/galleries/sebastien-boyesen-sculptures/ http: //sebboyesen. wix. com/seb-boyesen-test-site 2 https: //www. google. co. uk/search? q=Sebastien+Boyesen+SCULPTOR&hl=en&prmd=imvnso&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei =FFBGUIz. WKd. Or 0 AXo 0 YHIAg&ved=0 CDEQs. AQ&biw=1680&bih=904 Renowned sculptor Sebastian Boyesen was commissioned to design and build the new Six Bells Miners Memorial to coincide with the 50 th anniversary of the 1960 Six Bells Colliery disaster. He lives in the coastal village of Llangrannog in Ceredigion. Sebastien Boyesen was born in Sussex in 1960. He studied at Cambridge College of Art and Technology between 1976 and 1978, and at Bournemouth and Poole College of Art and Design from 1978 to 1981. He followed this with a one year postgrad course in Stage Design at the Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff. And in 1983 Boyesen won the Welsh Arts Council Young Artists Award. Between late 1987 and 1989 he held the role of Sculptor for Heritage Projects in York, working on figurative museum exhibits. In 1991 the Merchant Navy Memorial was unveiled in Newport in south Wales, and soon after Boyesen took up the post of town sculptor for Newport Borough Council. Works during his time in the post include This Little Piggy Went To Market, Mural for the Library, Museum and Art Gallery, VE VJ memorial in the town centre (a cut granite floor mosaic), and The Vision Of St Gwynllyw, also known as The Bell Carrier. The late 1990 s saw The Broadway Wall installed for Mid Glamorgan County Council and the installations of the Scott Harbour Compass Rose in Cardiff Bay and the Wigan market place floor mosaic. Major works in the noughties include the Sunny Bar Gateway in Doncaster, two Millennium Markers sculptures in Blackburn, the Mortal Coil bronze sculpture for Neath Port Talbot Borough Council, Radstock Miners Memorial and the Battle of Britain Memorial for Westminster Council. More recently, Boyesen has been involved with the Chester-le-Street Civic Heart regeneration scheme and has seen the installation of sculptures Chartist Man and Lantern in Blackwood, south Wales. In 2009 he was commissioned to design and build the new Six Bells Miners Memorial to coincide with the 50 year anniversary of the Six Bells Colliery tragedy, after Blaenau Gwent County Borough Council and Six Bells Communities First secured the funding necessary to finance the project. Costing £ 200, 000, the memorial is a 12. 6 m high statue of a miner constructed of slices of corten steel standing on a 7. 4 m high sandstone face plinth. The name, age and occupation of each of the 45 victims is to be laser cut into the corten steel band that surrounds the plinth. Boyesen feels that the project represents a unique opportunity to remind the public of Wales' impact on the mining industry at large: "It is an opportunity to say something about an event which happened in the 1960 s that is still felt deeply by the local community. "The industrial revolution was fired by Welsh coal and ultimately, the British Empire was built using Welsh coal. People have forgotten this and the incredibly high cost that coal had on the local communities. " A future project for the sculptor is a life-size figurative bronze sculpture of Saint Carannog as part of a community project organized and funded by the residents of Llangrannog.