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Worlds Collide What happens when two worlds collide? Worlds Collide What happens when two worlds collide?

When you see this ask a question! n n What does the Eagle Feather When you see this ask a question! n n What does the Eagle Feather represent? Why would I choose a representation of an Eagle feather? (Created by an unknown Haida artist)

Indian Native Indian Native

Indian v. Native n n n Indian Someone from India – Myth – This Indian v. Native n n n Indian Someone from India – Myth – This was not the case – Europeans knew of the land mass of NA & SA but did not know its extent Not offensive but ignores 1000’s of years of history n n Native Means was here before Preferred way to refer to First Nations peoples Recognizes a history before Europeans

Context: Reasons for exploration n n Profit Knowledge Religion Imply the world would be Context: Reasons for exploration n n Profit Knowledge Religion Imply the world would be better if everyone lived like a European

Review n n Why did Europeans explore the “New World”? What was the perspective Review n n Why did Europeans explore the “New World”? What was the perspective held by Europeans?

European Attitudes n What did the Europeans think of the people they saw? European Attitudes n What did the Europeans think of the people they saw?

Case Study: Cartier n n n 1534 Cartier explored St. Lawerence Met the Mi’Kmaq Case Study: Cartier n n n 1534 Cartier explored St. Lawerence Met the Mi’Kmaq in July Mi’Kmaq had traded before with Europeans Cartier kidnapped chief Donnaconna and his 2 sons and took them to France Donnaconna and sons die in France Cartier puts cross on Mi’Kmaq lands

RESPECT? RESPECT?

What did the Europeans think of the native peoples? n n Called “Sauvage” – What did the Europeans think of the native peoples? n n Called “Sauvage” – meant lived with nature Meaning shifted to “Savage” – without culture

Admiral Columbus – On Navigation n “They should be good servants and intelligent, for Admiral Columbus – On Navigation n “They should be good servants and intelligent, for I observed that they quickly took in what was said to them, and I believe that they would easily be made Christians, as it appeared to me that they had no religion. I, our Lord being pleased, will take hence, at the time of my departure six natives for your Highnesses, that they may learn to speak. . ”

What about explorers to Canada? What about explorers to Canada?

What was the attitude toward native peoples? What was the attitude toward native peoples?

How did the Europeans see native peoples? n n n n Wards Violent Savage How did the Europeans see native peoples? n n n n Wards Violent Savage Without Culture Without Religion Gullible In need of protection

View of Native Populations: Past n n Spiritual Communion with nature View of Native Populations: Past n n Spiritual Communion with nature

View of Native Populations n n Subordinate What they can give and what can View of Native Populations n n Subordinate What they can give and what can be gotten

Modern Reality n n 46% of inmates in Stony Mountain Federal Penitentiary in 1989 Modern Reality n n 46% of inmates in Stony Mountain Federal Penitentiary in 1989 57% of all provincial correctional institutions

“Indian Mascots” “Indian Mascots”

“Indian Mascots” Atlanta Braves NBL Shawinigan Cataractes QM Washington Redskins NFL Vancouver Canucks NHL “Indian Mascots” Atlanta Braves NBL Shawinigan Cataractes QM Washington Redskins NFL Vancouver Canucks NHL Cleveland Indians ABL Chicago Blackhawks NHL

Modern Reality Modern Reality

Native Mascots and Honour? n n CBC. ca | Re. Vision Quest | Past Native Mascots and Honour? n n CBC. ca | Re. Vision Quest | Past Episodes (June 30, Episode 1 – Sports Logo) Complete organizer as the episode plays.

Honour or Disrespect? Honour or Disrespect?

Modern Reality n n 35% 14 and under in 2001 25% of teens on Modern Reality n n 35% 14 and under in 2001 25% of teens on reserves choose suicide More than 50% living in single parent homes Higher rates of substance abuse, and poverty than non-native children

Getting Back n n n Fighting for recognition Gaining Programming Finding insight Finding themselves Getting Back n n n Fighting for recognition Gaining Programming Finding insight Finding themselves after years of the Indian Act Finding their own voice in the Media (APTN)

From… To… From… To…

Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n n C 1. Shared Ways of Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n n C 1. Shared Ways of Thinking Students will demonstrate an understanding of the concept of culture and will recognize the effect of their own cultural knowledge and experiences on their interpretations of other cultures. Explore their ideas about culture and compare their ideas to standard descriptors. Use organizational schemata while examining and comparing cultures. Recognize the influence of their own culture on their own interpretation of other cultures. Appreciate the complex nature of pre-contact Mi’kmaq culture and society. Analyse portrayals and images of First Nations peoples in various media, both historical and contemporary.

Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n C 4. Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n C 4. Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow: An Evolving Culture Students will examine the evolving nature of Mi’kmaq culture and recognize the challenges it faces from dominant cultural beliefs and practices. Identify a number of evolving dimensions within Mi’kmaq culture Represent elements of oral histories through a skit, dialogue, or short play Examine Mi’kmaq contemporary culture and community life through a variety of media Explore popular culture and the tensions and pulls that exist between dominant beliefs and practices and traditional culture.

Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n n C 5. Expressions of Culture: Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n n C 5. Expressions of Culture: Traditions of Artwork, Craftwork, Music, and Literature Students will demonstrate an appreciation for traditional and contemporary expressions of First Nations art, crafts, music, and literature. Distinguish between Western and traditional First Nations concepts of art Identify and describe traditional crafts of the Mi’kmaq Demonstrate a knowledge of and an appreciation for individual artists and their work. Read, interpret, and evaluate a variety of works of First Nations literature Co-operatively select and notate a variety of pieces of literature for inclusion in an anthology Identify universal themes in First Nations literature and art.

Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n S 4. The Encircling Traditions: Mi’kmaq Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n S 4. The Encircling Traditions: Mi’kmaq Spirituality Today Students will explore the renewal of traditional spirituality within the Mi’kmaq community and the response of the institutional church to this renewal. Identify key issues and concerns relating to renewal of Native spirituality Gain experimental knowledge of traditional rituals and symbols and reflect on their personal meanings. Use an experience of poetry to synthesize their understanding of Mi’kmaq spirituality as it has been practised over the centuries.

Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n SE 2. Dispossessed: The Mi’kmaq Experience Outcomes and Indicators of Mastery n n n SE 2. Dispossessed: The Mi’kmaq Experience Students will demonstrate an understanding of the historic and contemporary causes of social and economic marginalization of Mi’kmaq people. Examine early relations between the Mi’kmaq and the Europeans and assess the impact of these relations on the economy of the Mi’kmaq. Describe the impact of federal government initiatives – including the establishment of reserves, the adoption and administration of the Indian Act, and centralization on social and economic conditions within the Mi’kmaq Nation Identify the influences of social, cultural, and economic background on lifestyle Extend their understanding of issues related to poverty and unemployment and deepen their empathy for persons living in these conditions.

Summative Assessment 1. Define culture in your own words. Why is it so complicated Summative Assessment 1. Define culture in your own words. Why is it so complicated to define? 2. How do you see modern native culture? What do you see happening as a result of contact? 3. What did the European people think of the native people when they first came to North and South America? 4. How did these views impact how the European people treated native populations? Make sure to use an example to back up your point. 5. THIS ANSWER REQUIRES MORE THINKING AND WILL THUS REQUIRE A LONGER RESPONSE! You may answer in an essay, a poem, or visually. Do teams that are named after native populations or use native mascots honour native groups or do they defile or disrespect them? PLEASE USE EXAMPLES! Make sure you pass in your web graphic as well on the Re-Vision Quest Episode. 6. Is it all doom and gloom or is there hope for a change in the perception by and of native peoples? Again, give examples.