Скачать презентацию World Meteorological Organization Working together in weather climate Скачать презентацию World Meteorological Organization Working together in weather climate

1e462ff014314c3fa5b4eaf5604ba418.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 23

World Meteorological Organization Working together in weather, climate and water WMO Strengthening Meteorological, Hydrological World Meteorological Organization Working together in weather, climate and water WMO Strengthening Meteorological, Hydrological and Climate Services to support Risk Assessment and Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems WMO Initiative in the Central America and the Caribbean Dr. Albert Martis Chair RAIV DRR Co-Chair CCl OPACE IV Climate Information for Adaptation and Risk Management www. wmo. int

Hyogo Framework for Action 1 Alignment of clear policies, legislation, planning, resources at national Hyogo Framework for Action 1 Alignment of clear policies, legislation, planning, resources at national to local Levels (Multi-sectoral, Multi-agency) Risk Assessment Historical Hazard databases 2 Hazard statistics Climate forecasting and forward looking hazard trend analysis Exposed assets & vulnerability Risk analysis tools Risk Reduction Risk Transfer Preparedness (saving lives): early warning systems emergency planning and response 3 Prevention (Reduction of economic losses): Medium to long term sectoral planning (e. g. zoning, infrastructure, agriculture) CATastrophe insurance & bonds 5 Weather-indexed insurance and derivatives 4 Information and Knowledge Sharing 6 Education and training across agencies

Early Warning Systems Require Coordination Across Many Levels and Agencies National to local disaster Early Warning Systems Require Coordination Across Many Levels and Agencies National to local disaster risk reduction plans, legislation and coordination mechanisms 1 3 2 4

10 Basic principles for effective Early Warning Systems 1. Political recognition of the benefits 10 Basic principles for effective Early Warning Systems 1. Political recognition of the benefits of EWS along with effective planning, legislation and budgeting 2. Effective EWS are built upon four components: (i)) hazard detection, monitoring and forecasting; (ii) analyzing risks and incorporation of risk information in emergency planning and warnings; (iii) disseminating timely and “authoritative” warnings with clarity on the responsibilities and mandate for issuance of warnings; (iv) community emergency planning and preparedness and the ability to activate emergency plans to prepare and respond 3. Roles and responsibilities of all EWS stakeholders and their collaboration mechanisms clearly defined and documented 4. Capacities aligned with resources across national to local levels (sustainability) 5. Hazard, exposure and vulnerability information are used to carryout risk assessments at different levels

10 Basic principles for effective Early Warning System (Continued) 6. 7. 8. 9. Clear, 10 Basic principles for effective Early Warning System (Continued) 6. 7. 8. 9. Clear, consistent and actionable hazard warnings, with risk information and issued from a single recognized authoritative source Timely, reliable, redundant and sustainable warning dissemination mechanisms Emergency response plans targeted to the individual needs of the vulnerable communities, authorities and emergency responders Regular training and education programmes in risk awareness and emergency response actions 10. Effective feedback mechanisms throughout levels of the EWS for system improvement over time

There is need for investments in all components of Early Warning Systems ! 1 There is need for investments in all components of Early Warning Systems ! 1 National Government DRR coordination mechanisms Aligned policies, plans, resources, coordination 4 bac feed war 4 ning s k warnings feedback 5 5 Capacity Development and Coordinated National Technical Agencies 2 Meteorological Hydrological 4 warnings feedback Geological Marine Health, Agricuture (etc. ) 5 Local Communities responsible for emergency preparedness and response 3 Community Prepared

Coordination and Cooperation with National Hydro-Met Services Increasing Level of coordination with civil protection Coordination and Cooperation with National Hydro-Met Services Increasing Level of coordination with civil protection and risk management agencies for issuance of warnings Type II Hazard fully under the mandate of NMHS Hazard under joint mandate with another technical agency e. g. strong winds, strong rainfall, snow/ice, hail, tropical cyclone e. g. floods, landslides, heat/health etc. Type III Hazard under mandate of other agencies but NMHS contribute e. g. locust, health epidemic, manmade hazards Increasing Level of coordination with technical agencies for early detection, monitoring and development of warnings

Need for Strengthening National and Regional Operational Capacities policies/legislation/coodination and planning Reduction of Risks: Need for Strengthening National and Regional Operational Capacities policies/legislation/coodination and planning Reduction of Risks: Life, economics sectors: International aspects Regional aspects National aspects, with consideration for evolving DRR DRM and civil protection, agriculture, water resource management, infrastructure and planning, urban development, health insurance and financial markets, etc Products and Service Delivery Capacity Building Forecasting and analysis tools Observations and data Research and modeling

Initiatives and pilot projects in RA IV Central America The Caribbean Initiatives and pilot projects in RA IV Central America The Caribbean

Early Warning Systems with Multi-Hazard Approach Pilot Project – Central America • Pilot Countries: Early Warning Systems with Multi-Hazard Approach Pilot Project – Central America • Pilot Countries: – Costa Rica (World Bank Funded) – El Salvador (NOAA – USAID funded) – Mexico (Government and NOAA – USAID funded) • National multi-agency cooperation (Met/Hydro/DRM) • Multi-level (Regional, National, Local) • Focus: Flash Flood-Riverine Flood Warning Systems • Partners: WMO, NOAA-NWS, UNDP, World Bank

The Caribbean The Caribbean

Where ? Strengthened coordination and cooperation across British, French, Dutch and Spanish Speaking countries Where ? Strengthened coordination and cooperation across British, French, Dutch and Spanish Speaking countries and territories Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermudas, the British Caribbean Territories, the Caribbean Netherlands, Cuba, Curacao, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, the French West Indies, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint-Marteen, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago.

Who? Key Stakeholders in Multi-Hazard EWS in the Caribbean ü National: • National Meteorological Who? Key Stakeholders in Multi-Hazard EWS in the Caribbean ü National: • National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHS) and Disaster Risk Management (DRM) Agencies and other key ministries of the beneficiary countries. • Other EWS stakeholders such as media, economic sectors (health, agriculture, ) (TBD) ü Regional: • Regional centers and agencies of CARICOM: CDEMA, CMO and its CIMH; • WMO RA IV and its DRR Task Team, WMO RA IV Hurricane Committee, the WMO RSMC – Miami Hurricane Center • Regional agencies and platforms: ACS, OAS, the Eastern Caribbean Donor Group, Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) • Other regional partners (TBD) ü International and donors: • UN and International Agencies: WMO, UNESCO-IOC, UN-ISDR, UNDP, IFRC, etc. • Bi-lat donors and development banks: IADB, World Bank, USAID/OFDA, Canada (CIDA), Finland (MFA), Spain (ACE), Japan (JICA), UK (DFID), EU, Italy, France, etc.

What? Topics for Strengthening Multi-Hazard EWS at National and Regional • Policy, legal, legislative What? Topics for Strengthening Multi-Hazard EWS at National and Regional • Policy, legal, legislative issues pertaining to DRR and role of NMHS • Risk Assessment and Modeling, including data management and exchange issues • Operational Cooperation of National Meteorological and Hydrological Services and Disaster Risk Management Stakeholders (DRM agencies and other ministries and technical agencies) • Observing, Monitoring, Forecasting capacities • Coordination of Watch and Warning Systems in the region

Roadmap for the project design to strengthen Caribbean Risk Assessment and MHEWS capacities Consultations, Roadmap for the project design to strengthen Caribbean Risk Assessment and MHEWS capacities Consultations, Major Milestones and Timeline MHEWS Consultants’ missions MHEWS Consultation MH in the region and Training Technical Forecasting assessment of all Workshop Cooperation meeting assessment and – Workshop projects Hurricane Costa Rica Barbados Cayman Is. Committee June – September March November 22 November Cayman 2010 Islands 7 March 2011 2010 Jamaica http: //www. wmo. int/pages/ prog/drr/events/Barbados/i ndex_en. html Official Regional Meeting PWS workshop - to endorse Phase I project proposal Miami March/April 2011 Consultation http: //www. wmo. int/pages/prog/d rr/events/MHEWSCosta. Rica/inde x_en. html Warning Communicati on/CAP December 2010 Develop phase I project proposals, implementation plan, resource mobilizations and identification of forums for on-going regional dialogue with Members, development partners and donors 2012 Phase I Project Launch

Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Regional agencies and centers Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Regional agencies and centers such as RSMC-Miami Hurricane Center, CMO/CIMH, etc. supporting NMSs Type III No NMS Type I NMS Regional agencies and centers such as CDEMA and others supporting DRM agencies II: ype ip T a DRM d sh rts tion slan Rela Suppo other i S 1 n an NM cy i n age DRM Agency III Relationship Type I: NMS 1 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency I Relationship Type I: NMS 2 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency II NMS 1 Supports NMS 2 Techni cal: Type I Antigua & B. Bahamas Barbados Belize Cayman Cuba Curaçao Dominican Rep. Guadeloupe Guyana Haiti Jamaica Martinique St Lucia Suriname Trinidad & T. Type II NMS

Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Type II Barbados Dominica Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Type II Barbados Dominica St Vincent & G. Curaçao Aruba St Marteen Trinidad & T. Grenada Regional agencies and centers such as RSMC-Miami Hurricane Center, CMO/CIMH, etc. supporting NMSs Type III No NMS Regional agencies and centers such as CDEMA and others supporting DRM agencies II: ype ip T a DRM d sh rts tion slan Rela Suppo other i S 1 n an NM cy i n age DRM Agency III NMS I Relationship Type I: NMS 1 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency I Type II NMS Relationship Type I: NMS 2 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency II

Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Type III Antigua & Different relationships between Disaster Management Agencies and Meteorological Services Mapped Type III Antigua & B. Anguilla BVI Montserrat St Kitts & N. Bahamas Turks and C. Curaçao Saba/St Eustatius Bonaire Guadeloupe St Martin/St Barth Regional agencies and centers such as RSMC-Miami Hurricane Center, CMO/CIMH, etc. supporting NMSs Type III No NMS Regional agencies and centers such as CDEMA and others supporting DRM agencies II: ype ip T a DRM d sh rts tion slan Rela Suppo other i S 1 n an NM cy i n age DRM Agency III Type I NMS Relationship Type I: NMS 1 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency I Type II NMS Relationship Type I: NMS 2 Directly supports their own DRM agency DRM Agency II

Commission for Climatology Expert Team CIARM • to improve decision-making for planning, operations, risk Commission for Climatology Expert Team CIARM • to improve decision-making for planning, operations, risk management and for adaptation to both climate change and variability (covering time scales from seasonal to centennial) • The activities undertaken under CIARM primarily focus on the development of tailored climate information, products and services for user application in adaptation and risk management • These activities provide key contributions to the User Interface Platform (UIP) component of the Global Framework for Climate Services • Co-chairs: Rodney Martinez (Ecuador) and Albert Martis (Curaçao).

Climate services & Capacity at National Level Guidelines for National Presentation • • Human Climate services & Capacity at National Level Guidelines for National Presentation • • Human Resource capacity Infrastructure Capacity Procedural Capacity Institutional Capacity

Development of the Global Framework for Climate Services at the national level GFCS Questionnaire Development of the Global Framework for Climate Services at the national level GFCS Questionnaire for the self assessment of the countries capacities to deliver and use climate services http: //www. wmo. int/pages/gfcs/office/Car_Reg_WS. php

Danki Bedank Gracias Thank You Danki Bedank Gracias Thank You