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Why use nursery rhymes in KA and K as texts for learning English grammar? Why use nursery rhymes in KA and K as texts for learning English grammar? 1. Models of complete sentences (and non-complete sentences and the aural patterns of literary English: pitch, pacing, inflections, emphasis, pacing 2. Rhymers are readers! Looking at rhyming words repeatedly imprints mental images of words that have particular sounds. 3. Vocabulary development, esp. of literary words (ex. : fetch, cupboard) 4. The joy of words and word play: difference between real words and nonsense words

Why use nursery rhymes in KA and K as texts for learning English grammar? Why use nursery rhymes in KA and K as texts for learning English grammar? 5. Story format: beginning, middle, end 6. Math words and concepts are inherently part of poetry 7. Easy to act out, strengthening kinesthetic learning Summary: music, poetry, literature, math, cultural literacy, visualization, grammar foundations

Hey diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The Hey diddle, the cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed to see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon. Language Opportunities: Generate verbs: The cow ______ over the moon.

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall. Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall. Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. All the king’s horses and all the king’s men Couldn’t put Humpty together again. Language Opportunities: Learn: the contractions: Couldn’t Wouldn’t Shouldn’t (different hand gestures for each)

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep, And doesn’t know where to find them. Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep, And doesn’t know where to find them. Leave them alone, and they’ll come home, Wagging their tails behind them. Language Opportunities: Pronouns: Talk about who/what the pronouns refer to: her (whose? ) them (what? ) they’ll (what? ) their (what? )

Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells, and cockle shells, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? With silver bells, and cockle shells, And pretty maids all in a row. Language Opportunities: Vocabulary: How do we explain the word “contrary”? Vocabulary: What are “maids’” in this context? Vocabulary: What other flower names do we know?

Peter, pumpkin eater, Had a wife but couldn’t keep her. He put her in Peter, pumpkin eater, Had a wife but couldn’t keep her. He put her in a pumpkin shell, And there he kept her very well. Language Opportunities: Grammar: Reinforce the use of “well” with an action verb: And there he kept her very well. And there he fed her very well. And there he helped her very well. And there he saw her very well. And there he kissed her very well. And there he liked her very well. And there he loved her very well. etc.

There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile, He found a There was a crooked man, and he walked a crooked mile, He found a crooked sixpence upon a crooked stile. He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse, And they all lived together in a crooked little house. Language Opportunities: Grammar/Vocabulary: Generate replacements for “lived”: And they all ate together in a crooked little house. And they all played together in a crooked little house. And they all laughed together in a crooked little house. And they all cried together in a crooked little house. And they all slept together in a crooked little house. And they all woke together in a crooked little house. And they all…

Three blind mice, three blind mice, See how they run. They all ran after Three blind mice, three blind mice, See how they run. They all ran after the farmer’s wife. She cut off their tails with a carving knife. Did you ever see such a sight in your life? As three blind mice, three blind mice. Language Opportunities: Play with the numbers: One blind mouse, Two blind mice, Three blind mice, etc. Other nouns with irregular plurals: goose/geese foot/feet tooth/teeth

Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard To get her poor dog a bone. Old Mother Hubbard went to the cupboard To get her poor dog a bone. But when she got there, The cupboard was bare, And so the poor dog had none. Language Opportunities: Emphasize “went” as the past tense of “go” Replace “get” with other verbs: fetch, find, feed, give…

Little Miss Muffet Sat on a tuffet, Eating her curds and whey. Along came Little Miss Muffet Sat on a tuffet, Eating her curds and whey. Along came a spider, And sat down beside her, And frightened Miss Muffet away. Language Opportunities: Vocabulary: What other verbs can replace “sat down” in “…and ____ down beside her. ” sneaked up crawled up walked up…

Old King Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was Old King Cole was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he. He called for his pipe, and he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three. Language Opportunities: Vocabulary: What other adjectives can replace “merry”:

There was an old woman who lived in a shoe. She had so many There was an old woman who lived in a shoe. She had so many children, she didn’t know what to do. She gave them some broth without any bread, And whipped them all soundly and sent them to bed. Language Opportunities: Vocabulary: What other verbs/adverbs can replace “whipped them all soundly”: “kissed them all gently” “read to them sweetly”

Poems and Quotations to Learn English Grammar by… (from) Jabberwocky “’Twas brillig, and the Poems and Quotations to Learn English Grammar by… (from) Jabberwocky “’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did hyre and gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. “Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch! by Lewis Carroll, 2872

What’s in a name? A rose by any other name Would smell as sweet. What’s in a name? A rose by any other name Would smell as sweet. William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some become great, And some Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some become great, And some have greatness thrust upon them. William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night

All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: They All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players: They have their exits and their entrances. And one man in his time plays many parts. . William Shakespeare, As You Like It

Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to Friends, Romans, Countrymen! Lend me your ears. I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them. The good is oft interred with their bones. William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

A House is a House… A hill is a house for an ant, an A House is a House… A hill is a house for an ant, an ant. . A hive is a home for a bee. A hole is a house for a mole or a mouse, And a house is a house for me. Mary Ann Hoberman

Brother I had a little brother And I brought him to my mother And Brother I had a little brother And I brought him to my mother And I asked her for another Little brother for a change. But she said don’t be a bother So I took him to my father And I said this little bother Of a brother’s very strange. But he said one little brother Is exactly like another And every little brother Misbehaves a bit, he said. So I took the little brother From my mother and my father And I put the little brother Of a brother back to bed. Mary Ann Hoberman

Today I Shall Powder My Elephant’s Ears Today I shall powder my elephant’s ears Today I Shall Powder My Elephant’s Ears Today I shall powder my elephant’s ears and paint his posterior red, I’ll trim all his toenails with suitable shears and place a toupee on his head. Tonight I shall tie a balloon to his tail and wrap him in feathers and furs, then fasten his necktie and velveteen veil and put on his boots and his spurs. There’ll be a warm smile on my elephant’s fact as we’re welcomed to Pachyderm Hall, to dance until daybreak with elegant grace at the elephants’ masquerade ball. Jack Prelutsky

I’m Sorry! I’m sorry I squashed a banana in bed, I’m sorry I bandaged I’m Sorry! I’m sorry I squashed a banana in bed, I’m sorry I bandaged a whole loaf of bread, I’m sorry I pasted the prunes to your pants, I’m sorry I brought home the ants. I’m sorry for letting the dog eat the broom, I’m sorry for freeing a frog in your room, I’m sorry I wrote on the wall with sardines, I’m sorry I sat on the beans. I’m sorry for putting the peas in my hair, I’m sorry for leaving the eggs on your chair, I’m sorry for tying a can to the cat, I’m sorry for being a brat. Jack Prelutsky

Swiss Cheese Soup Swiss cheese soup, the soup du jour, Is chronically elusive. Attempts Swiss Cheese Soup Swiss cheese soup, the soup du jour, Is chronically elusive. Attempts to twist it on a spoon Have proven inconclusive. Swiss Cheese soup is slimy goop; Its contents are elastic. It consists of bacon bits, And tastes like melted plastic. The slurping up of Swiss cheese soup Is not without chagrin: One cannot help but notice Stubborn strands around one’s chin. The act of eating Swiss cheese soup Is whimsical and scary. It’s not for the fastidious And not for the unwary. Amy Benjamin