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Who was Shakespeare? English IV http: //reckon. ws/word/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/shakespeare 2. JPG Who was Shakespeare? English IV http: //reckon. ws/word/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/shakespeare 2. JPG

Birth/Death • No one is sure, but we think the day of his birth Birth/Death • No one is sure, but we think the day of his birth and death are the same • Birth: April 23, 1564 • Death: April 23, 1616 – Born in Stratford-on-Avon – Baptized at Holy Trinity Church on April 26, 1564 according to church records

Parents • Father: John Shakespeare – Glover – Dealer in wood, farm products – Parents • Father: John Shakespeare – Glover – Dealer in wood, farm products – Prosperous officer in Stratford (ale taster, assessor of fines, chamberlain, alderman, bailiff – similar to a sheriff) • Mother: Mary Arden Shakespeare – Her father is prosperous landowner – Married John Shakespeare in 1557

Childhood • • Eldest of six children Attended a local grammar school Saw travelling Childhood • • Eldest of six children Attended a local grammar school Saw travelling plays as a child Father went bankrupt, lost high position • Shakespeare had to go to work and leave prestigious grammar school

Young Adulthood • • Marries Anne Hathaway on Nov. 28, 1582 He is 18 Young Adulthood • • Marries Anne Hathaway on Nov. 28, 1582 He is 18 She is eight years older First child, Susanna, born May 1583 (you do the math!) • Twins, Judith and Hamnet, born Feb. 1585 – Hamnet dies in 1596 • Left for London after around 1586

Apprenticeship to London Theater • 1586 -1594 • Started as an actor (and always Apprenticeship to London Theater • 1586 -1594 • Started as an actor (and always stays one!) • Made money, started writing • Wrote poetry when theaters closed 1592 -4 – Why might theaters close? – “Venus and Adonis, ” “Rape of Lucrece” and many of his sonnets to the Dark Lady

Growing Mastery • 1594 -1599 • Joins Lord Chamberlain’s Men acting troupe, best of Growing Mastery • 1594 -1599 • Joins Lord Chamberlain’s Men acting troupe, best of the day! – Richard Burbage a fellow actor – Heminge and Condell also fellow actors; these two will publish Shakespeare’s First Folio edition of all his plays • Performed in public theaters, at court • Bought New Place, largest house in Stratford – What family event might affect Shakespeare?

Maturity • 1599 -1608 • Globe opens in 1599, Lord Chamberlain’s men own it Maturity • 1599 -1608 • Globe opens in 1599, Lord Chamberlain’s men own it (10 of them) • 1603 – Change to King’s Men – Why might this have happened? • Writes greatest tragedies, Macbeth, Hamlet, Julius Caeser, King Lear

Synthesis and Serenity • 1608 -1616 • King’s Men buy Blackfriar’s in 1608. Indoor Synthesis and Serenity • 1608 -1616 • King’s Men buy Blackfriar’s in 1608. Indoor theater lit by candles – How might this change culture? • Retires around 1610 to Stratford • Writes his will before death – Leaves fellow actors his rings – Leaves wife the “second best bed” • Buried April 25, 1616, in Trinity Church at Stratford – Tombstone marker addressed to sextant

Shakespeare’s Style • Blank verse: unrhymed iambic pentameter • Rhyming couplets: heighten emotion, concludes Shakespeare’s Style • Blank verse: unrhymed iambic pentameter • Rhyming couplets: heighten emotion, concludes scenes and acts • Prose: used in speeches of lower class characters. Why? • Puns: play on words • Play within a play: metatheatre • Stichomythia: exchange of single lines in which the words of one speaker are picked up and tossed back by another. Duel with words (Hamlet and Polonius)

Shakespeare’s Style • Soliloquy: monologue by a central character which reveal their innermost thoughts; Shakespeare’s Style • Soliloquy: monologue by a central character which reveal their innermost thoughts; a discourse made by one in solitude to one’s self • Aside: words spoken by a character to himself but unheard by others onstage • Dramatic irony: audience knows what characters onstage do not

Dramatic Structure • A well-built tragedy will commonly show the following divisions, each representing Dramatic Structure • A well-built tragedy will commonly show the following divisions, each representing a phase of the dramatic conflict – Introduction/Exposition – Rising Action/Complication – Climax/Turning Point – Falling Action – Catastrophe/Denouement

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Hamlet/Macbeth • For the most part, these two plays follow this structure, with some Hamlet/Macbeth • For the most part, these two plays follow this structure, with some leeway as to when exactly each begins and ends – Act I: Exposition – Act II: Rising Action – Act III: Climax – Act IV: Falling Action – Act V: Catastrophe