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WHEN SPELL-CHECK LETS YOU DOWN: COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS & OTHER INSIDIOUS IMPOSTERS Teri Lynn WHEN SPELL-CHECK LETS YOU DOWN: COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS & OTHER INSIDIOUS IMPOSTERS Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College Roseville By Kathryn Mincey Associate Professor of English Morehead State University

“Owed to the Spell Checker” Eye halve a spelling checker It came with my “Owed to the Spell Checker” Eye halve a spelling checker It came with my pea sea It plainly marks four my revue Miss steaks eye kin knot sea. Eye strike a key and type a word And weight four it two say Weather eye am wrong oar write It shows me strait a weigh. As soon as a mist ache is maid, It nose bee fore two long And eye can put the error rite, Its rare lea ever wrong. Eye have run this poem threw it, Eye am shore your pleased two no Its letter perfect awl the weigh, My checker tolled me sew.

COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS These pesky pairs or groups of words are frequently mistaken for COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS These pesky pairs or groups of words are frequently mistaken for each other and are insidious because the spell checker will not catch them.

COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS They are spelled correctly when used in the appropriate context, but COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS They are spelled correctly when used in the appropriate context, but writers often overlook the fact that they are spelling a related word that is inappropriate for their intended meaning.

THE EMBARRASSMENT FACTOR Because many of these words are familiar utility words, they create THE EMBARRASSMENT FACTOR Because many of these words are familiar utility words, they create tension: They are used often, but, their misuse can erode a reader’s confidence in the writer’s credibility.

WORDS OF THE WEEK PRESENTATIONS Each class meeting, students will be assigned to present WORDS OF THE WEEK PRESENTATIONS Each class meeting, students will be assigned to present 4 -5 pairs of these words to the class Where can you get the info? See handout Class Website, Internet Dictionary? BE CAREFUL!!!! (NOTE: if searching the internet, you MUST enter BOTH words at once in the search engine)

PRESENTATIONS (CONTINUED) • Worth 100 points. You will be graded on – • Content PRESENTATIONS (CONTINUED) • Worth 100 points. You will be graded on – • Content (50), Presentation (25), Professionalism (25) The class is depending on you Bring the Commonly Confused WS each meeting – Write definitions/sentences as they are presented – • Peer evals: your classmates will be grading you individually, leaving anonymous comments for improvements. Each Peer Evaluation is worth 5 points.

WAYS TO REMEMBER on act e ct – tcom Affe ou the ct – WAYS TO REMEMBER on act e ct – tcom Affe ou the ct – Effe There = where? ) un Their = see an heir it means ------they own it (no ion ) tat erb uo (v AQ ote Qu To They’re = they are Then Than ←w = co Cite h en mp a ? re fore = be ede gh Prec throu ed = roce P E → ver ry Eve er rev fo h ac =e Whose → those Who’s = who is Site Sigh = Ca = Sc ll att e t=v ene, ision ntion loca to tion lace – in p nary Statio tt e r ry = le ne Statio

VOCABULARY MEETING 1 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 1 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College

THERE, THEIR, THEY’RE • There is an adverb meaning THERE, THEIR, THEY’RE • There is an adverb meaning "that location. " It is sometimes used with the verb to be as an idiom. It is spelled like here which means "this location. " – – • I put the collar right there. (that location) There are five prime numbers less than ten. (with to be) Their is a possessive pronoun. It always describes a noun. Note the spelling of their. It comes from the word they, so the e comes before the i. – Their dog has fleas. (possessive of they) – • They're is a contraction of they are. – – Note the spelling: The a from are is replaced by an apostrophe. They're number 1! (contraction of they are) Ways to remember. If you see HERE it is a place! (Where, There, Here). If you see HEIR it means they own something.

TO, TOO, TWO • To is a preposition which begins a prepositional phrase or TO, TOO, TWO • To is a preposition which begins a prepositional phrase or an infinitive. We went to a baseball game. (preposition) – We like to watch a good ball game. (infinitive) – • Too is an adverb meaning "excessively" or "also. " Way to remember: TOO is extra, also, excessive. It has excessive O’s We ate too much. (meaning "excessively") – I like baseball, too. (meaning "also") – • Two is a number. Way to remember: Words which reflect the number two are spelled with tw: twin, twice, between, tweezers, etc. Six divided by three is two. (number) – They own two Brittany spaniels. (number) –

WHOLE/ HOLE • Hole – (n) opening, (v) to crawl into an opening. I WHOLE/ HOLE • Hole – (n) opening, (v) to crawl into an opening. I found a hole in this donut. – Bears hole up for the winter. – • Whole (adj) complete – You have the whole world in your hands. Way to remember: if it refers to a complete item/idea it needs the whole W.

Whose → those WHO’S/WHOSE • Who’s = who is Who's is a contraction of Whose → those WHO’S/WHOSE • Who’s = who is Who's is a contraction of who (pron. ) and is (v. ) – Who's awesome? Whose means “who owns” or “who was”, etc. It is a possessive pronoun (adj. ) – Whose responsibility was it to bring marshmallows?

YOUR, YOU’RE • your is a possessive adjective, indicating ownership of something • • YOUR, YOU’RE • your is a possessive adjective, indicating ownership of something • • • you're is a contraction (combination) of you and are • • • That is your sock. Where is your potato? Do you know what you're doing? You're stupid. WTR: if you own it, it is yours. If you can replace it with You Are, then it is you’re

VOCABULARY MEETING 2 English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 2 English 10, Heald College

ITS/IT’S • It's is a contraction for it is. It's been good to know ITS/IT’S • It's is a contraction for it is. It's been good to know you. it has – It's a trap! Contraction: it is – • Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, more or less, of it or belonging to it. – • The cat liked its carrier. WTR: A simple test – If you can replace it[']s in your sentence with it is or it has, then your word is it's; otherwise, your word is its.

QUIET, QUITE, QUIT • Quiet (adj) “of little activity, ” (n. ) meaning “tranquility” QUIET, QUITE, QUIT • Quiet (adj) “of little activity, ” (n. ) meaning “tranquility” or “silence. ” (v. ) “to cause to be quiet. ” After lunch the children enjoyed an hour of quiet play. – We enjoyed the quiet of the countryside. – • Quite (adv) - “totally” or “completely. ” – • She was quite exhausted after the warm-up exercise. Quit - to stop, cease, desist. – I quit smoking.

WHICH, WITCH Which – options Which way should we go? Witch – evil, bad, WHICH, WITCH Which – options Which way should we go? Witch – evil, bad, or magical female My sister is a witch. Way to remember: A witch is a *itch that you don’t want to mess with.

CHOOSE/CHOSE • Choose is PRESENT TENSE for making a choice in the present. – CHOOSE/CHOSE • Choose is PRESENT TENSE for making a choice in the present. – • You choose to take a Tylenol right now. Chose is PAST TENSE – tells that a choice was made in the past. – You chose tequila last night. WTR: 1 O = Over, happened in the past

THAN / THEN Than is a conjunction used with comparisons. rhymes with pan. He THAN / THEN Than is a conjunction used with comparisons. rhymes with pan. He likes you more than me. Then is an adverb that refers to time. It rhymes with pen. First you take a cup of flour, and then you sift it. when ? Then ← WTR: Th. An for Comp. Arison ompare c Than =

VOCABULARY MEETING 3 English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 3 English 10, Heald College

WHETHER, WEATHER • Weather is usually a noun, can also be verb that means WHETHER, WEATHER • Weather is usually a noun, can also be verb that means "to be affected by the weather” or "to get/live through” How's the weather? – The weather is always great this time of year – That house is really weathered – I know we can weather this crisis – Whether is a conjunction that introduces possibilities or alternatives: You'll do it whether you like it or not – Whether you win or lose, you'll have done your best – • Ways to remember: whether is interchangeable with "if, " while weather indicates the temperature and atmospheric conditions.

CITE/SIGHT • Cite – to quote, summon, commend or call. Cite the author in CITE/SIGHT • Cite – to quote, summon, commend or call. Cite the author in an endnote. The officer cited the drunk driver. • Site – location, area, computer website, or to place something in an area You visit a Web site or the site of the crime. • Sight – the act of seeing, a view, a glimpse/ observation, to look in a direction. I lost my sight in an accident. Cite = Call attention to Site = Scene, location Sight = vision

WAIST/WASTE Waste: (n) discarded objects, (v) to use carelessly He wasted too much time. WAIST/WASTE Waste: (n) discarded objects, (v) to use carelessly He wasted too much time. The waste was toxic! Waist – middle portion of the body His waist is 36” around! Way to remember: if its on my body, it needs an i.

WE’RE, WERE, WHERE We’re – contraction of we + are. Were – (v) past WE’RE, WERE, WHERE We’re – contraction of we + are. Were – (v) past tense of are. We’re going to the beach. We were happy playing in the sand. Where is at or in what place (adv). Where in the world is Carmen Sandiego? WTR – when you see HERE it is a place!

THROUGH / THREW Through means from one point to its end (adv. ) or THROUGH / THREW Through means from one point to its end (adv. ) or because of (prep. ) I went through a lot of pain. Threw is the past tense of throw which means to toss or to fling (v. ) He threw the ball right at me! Way to remember: -EW = an action, a THROW. - also, you make it th. ROUGH some Rough times! Btw “thru” is an abbreviation, it’s NOT to be used outside of text messaging.

VOCABULARY MEETING 4 Teri “Is Awesome” Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 4 Teri “Is Awesome” Tosspon English 10, Heald College

WRITE, RIGHT, RITE Write (v): to form letters/words, to compose Right (adj) correct, conforming WRITE, RIGHT, RITE Write (v): to form letters/words, to compose Right (adj) correct, conforming to justice (n) power or privilege, direction opposite of left. I will write this paper, I guess. What is the right answer? ? ? ! Rite (n): traditional (often religious) ceremony. A bridal shower is a rite of passage. Way to remember: not left but RIGHT, Written is based on Write.

COARSE/COURSE Coarse is always an adjective meaning “rough, crude. ” Don’t use that coarse COARSE/COURSE Coarse is always an adjective meaning “rough, crude. ” Don’t use that coarse language in here! Course – N. or v. many meanings! Path, track, procedure, mode of conduct, to hunt or chase, etc. ALSO used in many idioms Of course, we do charge a fee. See you on the course! Take all required courses. If it has an A, it means “rough”, for all others, use COURSE

DESERT, DESSERT • Desert: A dry, arid, sandy place – • Dessert: A sweet DESERT, DESSERT • Desert: A dry, arid, sandy place – • Dessert: A sweet tasty item or dish you eat after a meal – • I got lost in the desert. I like pie for dessert. WTR: an extra S (in Dessert) = extra food at the end of the meal!

DO/DUE • Do – to perform, to create, to deal with, to handle – DO/DUE • Do – to perform, to create, to deal with, to handle – • I will do it later. Due – owed, because of No one would hang out with him, due to his temper. – The money is due. – WTR: If it involves $ (or means “because of”) use the UE version

KNOW/ NO • Know– (v) Be cognizant or aware of a fact or a KNOW/ NO • Know– (v) Be cognizant or aware of a fact or a specific piece of information; possess knowledge or information about • • I know the material. No the opposite of yes. Quantifier; used with either mass nouns or plural count nouns for indicating a complete or almost complete lack or zero quantity of or a negative There are no pies left. • No, I don’t think I’ll pass. • WTR: 2 letters = not yes or 0. KN is for knowledge

VOCABULARY MEETING 5 TT English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 5 TT English 10, Heald College

STEAK/STAKE • Steak- (n) is a thick slice of meat, usually in English-speaking countries STEAK/STAKE • Steak- (n) is a thick slice of meat, usually in English-speaking countries a slice of beef. Steak is normally grilled or fried - unless it is stewing steak. Steaks may also be cut from big fish, such as tuna or salmon. – I need to eat more steak. Stake- (n) stake is 'a post', a stout piece of wood driven into the ground. Also, 'the sum of money that is risked in a bet (v) to stake a claim, or to bet on something I’d stake my life on it. – I need some stakes to kill the vampire! –

APART/ A PART • pa Tho be rts se en ha ap tak ve APART/ A PART • pa Tho be rts se en ha ap tak ve ar en t! Apart (adv) into pieces or parts, separately in place, time, motion, to or at one side, (adj) having independent or unique qualities That hair really sets you apart, Mr. Flock of Seagulls. – I took the model apart. – • A Part– (n) noun phrase: to be joined with, a piece of I want to be a part of that group! – There is a part that I want for my car. – WTR – Think opposites: A Part (2 words) means joined with, The joined words Apart means into pieces! Like fall apart.

EVERYDAY / EVERY DAY • Everyday is an adjective that means commonplace, ordinary, or EVERYDAY / EVERY DAY • Everyday is an adjective that means commonplace, ordinary, or normal. These shoes are great for everyday wear – You shouldn't wear an everyday outfit to the wedding – Don't use the everyday dishes - it's a special occasion – • Every day. Every (adj) day (n. ) means "each day. " I go to the park every day. – I have to work every day except Friday. – Every day I feel a little better. – WTR: If you do it EACH day, use 2 words: Every day.

FARTHER / FURTHER • Farther refers to length or distance. It is the comparative FARTHER / FURTHER • Farther refers to length or distance. It is the comparative form of the word far when referring to distance. – London is farther north than Juneau. • • Further means "to a greater degree, " "additional, " or "additionally. " It refers to time or amount. It is the comparative form of the word far when meaning "much. " – The Master’s Degree requires further study. • – (Meaning "additional study, " refers to amount) According to my timetable, we should be further along. • • Refers to distance (Refers to time) WTR: Far = distance. Further = m. Uch, additionally

PATIENCE / PATIENTS patience (n. ) refers to the ability to wait or endure PATIENCE / PATIENTS patience (n. ) refers to the ability to wait or endure hardship for a long time without becoming upset. The dog was taught to have patience. patients (n) is the plural form of patient--someone who receives medical care. The patients were concerned. WTR: Patients =people.

VOCABULARY MEETING 6 English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 6 English 10, Heald College

PRINCIPAL / PRINCIPLE • Principal usually refers to a person. Remember that it ends PRINCIPAL / PRINCIPLE • Principal usually refers to a person. Remember that it ends in ‘pal’, which is a person. A principal can be: the head of a school, the head of an organization – the main person involved in a contract or financial negotiation – Adj meaning most important. My principal is pretty awesome. – • Principle - a standard, a law or a rule. This means you can have: I like the principles of economics, which are the laws that govern economic theory. – You have good moral principles, which are the rules and standards that govern your behavior – WTR: You can have an argument with your HS Princi. PAL about his principles.

LATER / LATTER • Later –(adj or adv) refers to time. – Though Amy LATER / LATTER • Later –(adj or adv) refers to time. – Though Amy said that she would join me later, I never saw her again. latter – (adj) being the second mentioned of two (distinguished from former). more advanced in time; near or comparatively near to the end: the latter part of the century. Obsolete. last; final – Cake or Pie? I prefer the latter (meaning I prefer pie!). WTR: 2 t’s = compares 2 things and this is the 2 nd thing.

LAY / LIE • Lay (v) means LAY / LIE • Lay (v) means "to place something • The reason lay and lie are confusing down" It is something you do to is their past tenses. something else. lay is laid. • The past tense of Lay down here yesterday. I–laid itthe book on the table. • (It is being doneto something else. ) being done to something else. ) • Lie (v)means "to recline" or "be placed. " It past tense of lie is lay. • Thedoes not act on anything or anyone else. – Lie yourself down awakecouch. Last night, I lay on the in bed. • (It is not being done to anything else. ) (It is not being done to anything

LESS / FEWER • Use fewer with objects that can be counted one-by-one. – LESS / FEWER • Use fewer with objects that can be counted one-by-one. – • There were fewer days below freezing last winter. (Days can be counted. ) Use less with qualities or quantities that cannot be individually counted. – I drank less water than she did. • • (Water cannot be counted individually here. ) When referring to time or money, less is normally used even with numbers. Specific units of time or money use fewer only in cases where individual items are referred to (I have fewer dollar coins in my collection than you).

GRANITE/GRANTED • Granted (v) to give (a favor or wish), a law, or responsible GRANITE/GRANTED • Granted (v) to give (a favor or wish), a law, or responsible for something. – • The genie granted my wish! Granite (n) A common, coarse-grained, light-colored, hard igneous rock consisting chiefly of quartz, orthoclase or microcline, and mica, used in monuments and for building. – Granite countertops are popular.

VOCABULARY MEETING 7 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 7 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College

LOSE / LOOSE • Lose (v) to suffer the loss of, to miss. I LOSE / LOOSE • Lose (v) to suffer the loss of, to miss. I win! You lose! – Don't lose your keys – I never lose bets – • Loose (Adj), the opposite of tight or contained. My shoes are loose. – I have a loose tooth. – There's a goose running loose in the street. – • • WTR: This confusion can easily be avoided if you pronounce the word intended aloud. If it has a voiced Z sound, then it’s “lose. ” If it has a hissy S sound, then it’s “loose. ” Loose rhymes with GOOSE, and both need 2 O’s

MAYBE / MAY BE • Maybe, the compound word, is an adverb meaning MAYBE / MAY BE • Maybe, the compound word, is an adverb meaning "perhaps" or "possibly. " – • May be is a verb phrase (may= adv, be = verb) meaning "might be" or "could be. " – • Maybe I will go out tonight. I may be going out tonight. If you can replace it with 2 words (“might be”) it IS two words.

PASSED/PAST • Past: (adj, adv, noun, or prep) previously (a period of time before PASSED/PAST • Past: (adj, adv, noun, or prep) previously (a period of time before now) or a distance. Beyond in time, space, distance, amount The team performed well in the past. – The police car drove past the suspect’s house. – • Passed, is an action. The past tense is “passed“: The red truck passed the blue truck. – The teacher was astonished that none of the students had passed the test. – After a brief illness, he passed away. Ways to Remember: however you have ”passed the time” you have never “past the time, ” not even in the distant past. Or remember – an ASS p. ASSed you on the freeway –

ALOUD/ALLOWED Aloud (adv) - 'out loud' and refers to sound (almost always speech). Please ALOUD/ALLOWED Aloud (adv) - 'out loud' and refers to sound (almost always speech). Please do not read aloud. You're disturbing everyone else in the library. Allowed' (v) past tense of the verb 'to allow', which means 'to permit'. 'Allowed' is synonymous with (the same as) 'permitted'. No dogs allowed on the beach.

BEAR/BARE Bear (v) to carry, to endure, to tolerate, to maintain a direction. (n) BEAR/BARE Bear (v) to carry, to endure, to tolerate, to maintain a direction. (n) a large mammal I can bear the load. Bear left on Douglas. Look out for that bear!!! Bare (adj) uncovered, naked, exposed. Don’t go in the water with bare feet! You did it with your bare hands.

VOCABULARY MEETING 8 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 8 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College

ALL READY / ALREADY • All ready (two words) means ALL READY / ALREADY • All ready (two words) means "ready, ” with the modifier indicating all. They are all ready to run the marathon. – (meaning, all in the family were ready) – • Already, an adverb, means "by now, " previously, "even now, " or "by then. " – The plane had already left when we arrived. WTR: If you are saying “everyone/ everything is ready” it is 2 different words: The books were all ready to be shipped. If used as an adverb, it is already.

BUY, BYE, BY By (prep) near, beside or through. Bye (interjection) is a greeting BUY, BYE, BY By (prep) near, beside or through. Bye (interjection) is a greeting of departure. He stood by his car and by his woman! "Bye!" I yelled to my friend as she drove away. Buy (v) to purchase. I buy my groceries at Raleys.

AMOUNT / NUMBER • Amount (n or v) words relate to quantities of things AMOUNT / NUMBER • Amount (n or v) words relate to quantities of things that are measured in bulk (with the exception of money) – • Number (n or v) to things that can be counted. – • Do not drink too great an amount of milk, you’ll barf. I have a large number of cupcakes to eat! Tip: Numbers can be counted, amounts are measured in bulk. (except for $$)

BESIDE/BESIDES Besides (Adv, prep. ) can mean “in addition to” Do you have any BESIDE/BESIDES Besides (Adv, prep. ) can mean “in addition to” Do you have any shirt besides the pink one? WTR : if it has an S it means “extra” (like plural) Beside (prep, adv) in contrast, usually means “next to. ” Pooh stood beside Rabbit, laughing.

CAPITOL/CAPITAL Capitol (n) is Always a building Congress held session in the Capitol. Can CAPITOL/CAPITAL Capitol (n) is Always a building Congress held session in the Capitol. Can remember this! COngress meets in the Capit. Ol (both have O’s). Capital – (n, adj) Money/wealth/property; fatal; most important, and/or city which serve as seat of government. The capital of Nebraska is Lincoln, home of the Huskers. The death sentence is capital punishment. The big letter that starts a sentence or proper noun is a capital letter. WTR: If its not an actual building, capital requires an A.

VOCABULARY MEETING 9 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY MEETING 9 Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College

ACCEPT/EXCEPT • Accept (v)– ACCEPT/EXCEPT • Accept (v)– "to receive. " – • He accepted the gift. (He received it. ) Except (prep, v) is usually a preposition meaning "but" or "leaving out. " However, except can also be a verb meaning "to leave out. " – He liked everyone except Carlos Palacios. . – Way to remember – EX is like your EX that you want to LEAVE OUT!

EXCESS/ACCESS Access –(n, v, adj) a way to enter. This place has internet access? EXCESS/ACCESS Access –(n, v, adj) a way to enter. This place has internet access? ! Excess ––(n, v, adj) too much Excess fat in your diet is bad. WTR: EX = TOO MUCH.

OUR / ARE Our (pronoun) possessive to indicate “we” owning something. Our cat is OUR / ARE Our (pronoun) possessive to indicate “we” owning something. Our cat is pretty fat. Are (v) Present tense verb “to be” We are pretty sure she ate the fish.

ADVICE/ADVISE Advice is the noun, an opinion or recommendation offered as a guide to ADVICE/ADVISE Advice is the noun, an opinion or recommendation offered as a guide to action, conduct. Advise- the act of giving advice. He gives good advice. I would advise you not to speak to him. Way to Remember: Advice (a noun like ice) is what is given.

AFFECT/EFFECT Affect –(v) to influence or alter in some way. Use the verb affected AFFECT/EFFECT Affect –(v) to influence or alter in some way. Use the verb affected when you mean influenced | rather than caused. The arrow affected the aardvark’s rear end. Effect – (n) the result of being affected. Use effect whenever any of these words precede it: a, any, the, take, into, no. (v. ) Bring about, cause. t on – ac ct me Affe utco eo – th ct Effe The effects of the rain have been local flooding. You use Effect after The, on, any, into, or no. Th. E Effect.

VOCABULARY EXTRA/MAKE-UP WORDS Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College VOCABULARY EXTRA/MAKE-UP WORDS Teri Lynn Tosspon English 10, Heald College

STATIONARY / STATIONERY Stationary (adj) not moving, still. (n) unmoving or staying in one STATIONARY / STATIONERY Stationary (adj) not moving, still. (n) unmoving or staying in one place. He stood stationary, waiting for the fight. Stationery (n) paper on which one writes or to other related items. (let the E in envelope remind you) Pass me the flowery stationery?

COMPLEMENT/COMPLIMENT • compliment: nice things said about someone – • COMPLEMENT/COMPLIMENT • compliment: nice things said about someone – • "She paid me the compliment of admiring the way I shined my shoes. ” Complement- matching or completing. Alice’s love for entertaining and Mike’s love for washing dishes complement each other. – the full number of something needed to make it complete: “My computer has a full complement of video-editing programs. ” If it is preceded by “full” the word you want is almost certainly “complement. ” – • Remember, if you’re not making nice to someone, the word is “complement. ”

CONSCIENCE/CONSCIOUS • Conscience – inner sense of right and wrong. – • Your conscience CONSCIENCE/CONSCIOUS • Conscience – inner sense of right and wrong. – • Your conscience makes you feel guilty when you do bad things. Conscious – aware, having mental faculties, known. If you are awake, you are conscious. – Although it is possible to speak of your “conscious mind, ” you can’t use “conscious” all by itself to mean “consciousness. ” –

COUNCIL/COUNSEL • Council– an assembly, a body of people – • I checked with COUNCIL/COUNSEL • Council– an assembly, a body of people – • I checked with the city council. Counsel– advice, to give advice – I could counsel you not to speak to him anymore.

CONTINUALLY/CONTINUOUSLY • Continually means CONTINUALLY/CONTINUOUSLY • Continually means "repeated again and again. " – • I was continually interrupted by the telephone. Continuously means "uninterrupted. " – It rained continuously forty-eight hours.

DISBURSE/DISPERSE • Disburse – to distribute, give out – • You disburse money by DISBURSE/DISPERSE • Disburse – to distribute, give out – • You disburse money by taking it out of your purse (French “bourse”) and distributing it. Disperse – scatter, drive off, dispel – If you refuse to hand out any money, the eager mob of beggars before you may disperse.