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What’s going on in Richmond? Items of Interest to VESIS March 21, 2012 Bethann What’s going on in Richmond? Items of Interest to VESIS March 21, 2012 Bethann H. Canada Director of Educational Information Management Virginia Department of Education

2012 Status Check 2012 Status Check

SFSF Requirements q Report on Teacher and Principal Evaluations q Match Teachers to Students SFSF Requirements q Report on Teacher and Principal Evaluations q Match Teachers to Students q Student-level Transcript Information q Students Enrolling in Postsecondary q Students Earning Credits in Postsecondary

SFSF Requirements q Report on Teacher and Principal Evaluations q Match Teachers to Students SFSF Requirements q Report on Teacher and Principal Evaluations q Match Teachers to Students q Student-level Transcript Information q Students Enrolling in Postsecondary q Students Earning Credits in Postsecondary

Legislation HB 96 ER Delays the Accreditation benchmarks slated for 2012 -2013 to 2013 Legislation HB 96 ER Delays the Accreditation benchmarks slated for 2012 -2013 to 2013 -14 (passed House and Senate)

Legislation HB 367 Requires DOE to publish disciplinary offense and outcome data disaggregated by Legislation HB 367 Requires DOE to publish disciplinary offense and outcome data disaggregated by race/ethnicity and gender (passed House and Senate) SB 514/HB 642 Requires the Board of Education to add three points to the Graduation and Completion Index for every student who earns a diploma and a Board-approved industry certification, pathway certification, state licensure, or an occupational competency credential (signed by Governor)

Legislation HB 1189 School boards may develop a standard form to obtain parental consent Legislation HB 1189 School boards may develop a standard form to obtain parental consent for the release of data. The form shall be used by Community Policy and Management Teams, and the Departments of Health, Social Services, Correctional Education, Juvenile Justice, and Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (passed House and Senate)

Legislation SB 489/HB 1061 Beginning with the 9 th grade class of 2013 -2014, Legislation SB 489/HB 1061 Beginning with the 9 th grade class of 2013 -2014, students must earn a career and technical education credential to earn a standard diploma. Standard or advanced diplomas require successful completion of one virtual course. The modified standard diploma is eliminated and the GAD program is folded into the Adult High School Diploma and requires a career and technical credential. ISAEP would require the student to earn a career and technical education credential and to pass a course in economics and finance. (passed House and Senate)

Legislation HB 424 Changes the Code regarding providing a minor’s school records from a Legislation HB 424 Changes the Code regarding providing a minor’s school records from a custody proceeding to any proceeding (passed House and Senate) HB 1215 Directs the Board of Education to develop standards for accrediting virtual schools (signed by the Governor)

Wo rkp lace ts en m IA CT NO Ind s ses s Rea Wo rkp lace ts en m IA CT NO Ind s ses s Rea din ess Your CTE data here ustr y. C erti fica tion s re su en t Sta Lic e s

CTE Credentials Annual increases in the percent of students earning credentials are worth a CTE Credentials Annual increases in the percent of students earning credentials are worth a bonus point in the VIP calculation Will help increase the Graduation and Completion Index (HB 642/SB 514) Will be required to earn a standard diploma, GAD, or ISAEP (HB 1061/SB 489) Will be added to the school report cards Part of the proposed ESEA Waiver (more on this later) to determine if a school meets performance expectations.

Virginia’s ESEA Waiver Approved by the Board on February 23 Submitted to USED on Virginia’s ESEA Waiver Approved by the Board on February 23 Submitted to USED on February 28 Is NOT yet approved We don’t know when it will be approved There may be negotiated changes http: //www. doe. virginia. gov/federal_programs/esea/va_esea_flexibility_application_2 -28 -12. pdf

AYP Here Lies AYP 2003 - 2011 Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request AYP Here Lies AYP 2003 - 2011 Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Proposed School Designations Reward Schools ◦ Virginia Index of Performance ◦ Title I Distinguished Proposed School Designations Reward Schools ◦ Virginia Index of Performance ◦ Title I Distinguished schools Priority Focus No Schools more “Made/Did Not Make AYP” Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Performance and Participation Expectations Meet SOA minimums in English, math, science, and history for Performance and Participation Expectations Meet SOA minimums in English, math, science, and history for all students, including the Graduation and Completion Index (in other words, Accreditation as we know it today) Test participation rate >= 95% for reading and math Public reporting of proficiency gaps for proficiency gap groups Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Gap Groups Gap Group 1: Students with disabilities, English Language Learners, and economically disadvantaged Gap Groups Gap Group 1: Students with disabilities, English Language Learners, and economically disadvantaged students (unduplicated). Gap Group 2: Black students, not of Hispanic origin, not already in Gap Group 1 Gap Group 3: Hispanic students, of one or more races, not already included in Gap Group 1 DOE will continue to disaggregate by the traditional subgroups for public reporting. Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Proficiency Gap Group Expectations for Elementary and Middle Schools Each Gap Group must: Meet Proficiency Gap Group Expectations for Elementary and Middle Schools Each Gap Group must: Meet the 95% participation rate in reading and math; AND Meet SOA Targets in reading and math; OR A majority of the students who failed reading and math must show moderate growth; OR Reduce the failure rate by 10 percent SGP’s 1 to 34 Low 35 to 65 Moderate 66 to 99 High Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Proficiency Gap Group Expectations for High Schools* Each Gap Group must: Meet the 95% Proficiency Gap Group Expectations for High Schools* Each Gap Group must: Meet the 95% participation rate in reading and math; AND Meet SOA Targets in reading and math; OR Meet a state goal of 48% of graduates earning a college-or-career-ready credential (CCRC); OR Increase the percent of graduates earning a CCRC by 10 percent * Schools with a graduating class Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Division Accountability The same participation and performance expectations as schools Meet Title III Annual Division Accountability The same participation and performance expectations as schools Meet Title III Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAOs) for limited English proficient student performance Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Priority Schools At least 5 percent of Virginia’s Title I schools (about 36 schools) Priority Schools At least 5 percent of Virginia’s Title I schools (about 36 schools) A Tier I or II SIG School A Title I School that is: ◦ A high school with an FGI of 60% or lower for the past two years ◦ Accreditation denied, or Conditionally-Reconstituted due to English or math performance ◦ Accredited with warning for English or math performance Schools will be rank ordered based on the sum of the differences between reading and math performance and the SOA targets. Schools with the largest gaps will be included, up to 36 schools. Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Before we talk about Focus Schools We need to learn about “Proficiency Gap Points” Before we talk about Focus Schools We need to learn about “Proficiency Gap Points” Calculate the difference between each Gap Group’s performance in Reading and/or Math and the SOA target for the subject Exclude groups that meet or exceed the target Sum the differences and divide by the number of gap groups You now have the school’s Average Proficiency Gap Points! Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Proficiency Gap Calculation Example School Proficiency Gap Performance Gap Group 1 Reading Performance Gap Proficiency Gap Calculation Example School Proficiency Gap Performance Gap Group 1 Reading Performance Gap Points Reading Target Reading Grade 3 – 5 Performance Math Target Math Performance Gap Points 75 70 64 6 75 60 15 70 60 10 75 65 10 70 75 NI Gap Group 2 Gap Group 3 Sum of Proficiency Gap Points Add point differences for each gap group Add point differences for each 30 gap group 16 Average Proficiency Gap Points Divide sum by number of gap groups included Divide sum by number of gap 10 groups included 8 Total Average Proficiency Gap Points Add the average Proficiency Gap Points NI – the group is not included because it met or exceeded the SOA target 18

Focus Schools At least 10 percent of Virginia’s Title I schools (about 72 schools) Focus Schools At least 10 percent of Virginia’s Title I schools (about 72 schools) Not a Priority School One or more Gap Groups have missed the SOA proficiency target in reading and/or math The 72 schools with the highest proficiency gap points are Focus Schools Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

What have we learned? Three Proficiency Gap Groups A hybrid of Accreditation and AYP What have we learned? Three Proficiency Gap Groups A hybrid of Accreditation and AYP Accreditation calculations do not change Incorporates Student Growth in Elementary and Middle Includes College and Career Ready measures for High Schools Reward, Priority, and Focus school designations Based on DOE’s unapproved flexibility request

Questions? Questions?