Скачать презентацию What Happened to 18 000 Votes Results of Скачать презентацию What Happened to 18 000 Votes Results of

294c724fd66c825af3925f29d7f5bb8d.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 40

What Happened to 18, 000 Votes? Results of the Sarasota Source Code Audit Michael What Happened to 18, 000 Votes? Results of the Sarasota Source Code Audit Michael I. Shamos, Ph. D. , J. D. Institute for Software Research School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University

Outline • What happened in Sarasota County? – The problem – Political events • Outline • What happened in Sarasota County? – The problem – Political events • Source code review – What was done – What was found – Vote flipping – Touchscreen delay • Where did the votes go? Buchanan Jennings

Florida U. S. House District 13 • Includes all of Sarasota, De Soto and Florida U. S. House District 13 • Includes all of Sarasota, De Soto and Hardee Counties • Parts of Manatee and Charlotte Counties

Voting Methods in District 13 • Manatee, De Soto and Hardee Counties use Diebold Voting Methods in District 13 • Manatee, De Soto and Hardee Counties use Diebold opscan • Sarasota and Charlotte Counties use ES&S i. Votronic touchscreen machines (no VVPAT), version 8. 0. 1. 2 Opscan Touchscreen

Florida U. S. House District 13 • Vern Buchanan (R) beat Christine Jennings (D) Florida U. S. House District 13 • Vern Buchanan (R) beat Christine Jennings (D) by 369 votes out of 238, 249 cast, a 0. 15% margin • In Sarasota County, 18, 412 ballots showed no vote at all in that race, an undervote of 15% • Jennings beat Buchanan, 65, 487 -58, 632 in Sarasota • If the 18, 412 undervotes followed that percentage (52. 76%-47. 24%), Jennings would win by 648 votes • The other counties in District 13 had an average undervote of 2. 5% (range: 2. 1 -4. 0%)

What Happened? • Jennings has filed suit in Florida. Can she find out? • What Happened? • Jennings has filed suit in Florida. Can she find out? • The Florida Secretary of State ordered an audit. Can he find out? • Congress is investigating. Can it find out? • What sort of forensic investigation is needed?

A New Election? • Legal scholars believe Jennings must show there was a machine A New Election? • Legal scholars believe Jennings must show there was a machine malfunction to win a new election • Voter “confusion” is not enough • Fla. Stat. § 102. 168(4) lists all grounds for a contest: – (c) Receipt of a number of illegal votes or rejection of a number of legal votes sufficient to change or place in doubt the result of the election. – (e) Any other cause or allegation which … would show that a person other than the successful candidate was … elected

U. S. Const. Art I, Sec. 5 • “Each House shall be the judge U. S. Const. Art I, Sec. 5 • “Each House shall be the judge of the elections, returns and qualifications of its own members” • Election matters are referred to the Committee on House Administration (9 members: 6 Dem, 3 Rep. ) • Federal Contested Elections Act, 2 U. S. C. § 318 ff. • Chairwoman Millender-Mc. Donald: “Florida law will facilitate the evaluation of the election contest – to the extent that it provides access to relevant and critical evidence … the House may not have to get involved at all if the state court does a thorough job. ” • Jennings is trying to show that the court is not doing a thorough job. April 13 memorandum.

ES&S i. Votronic Voting System • Ballot (eligible candidates) loaded from infrared device (“personal ES&S i. Votronic Voting System • Ballot (eligible candidates) loaded from infrared device (“personal electronic ballot” – PEB) • Choices (votes) recorded in 4 places: 3 on the machine, 1 on removable memory device • Totals printed at polling location AND sent to county on media for tabulation AND retained in machines • 1498 machines in Sarasota • Touchscreen DRE • Allegheny County uses a later version of i. Votronic: 9.

Some Possible Explanations • Software error – Voters cast votes, but no votes were Some Possible Explanations • Software error – Voters cast votes, but no votes were recorded – Unlikely, because 85% of votes were counted – Post-election testing, source code review • Tampering (malicious software) – Post-election testing – Source code review • Conscious voter protest – Unlikely, because of comparison demographics – Absentee (opscan) undervote in Sarasota was 2. 6% • Bad ballot layout – voters missed the race – Compare with Charlotte County

The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 1. 1% The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 1. 1%

The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 15% UNDERVOTE 1. 3% The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 15% UNDERVOTE 1. 3%

The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 5. 2% The Sarasota Ballot UNDERVOTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 5. 2%

Sarasota Summary Page Sarasota Summary Page

Comparison with Charlotte County • Sarasota and Charlotte used the same touchscreen system • Comparison with Charlotte County • Sarasota and Charlotte used the same touchscreen system • In Sarasota, House and Governor were on the same screen • In Charlotte, House had its own screen, but Attorney General and Governor were on the same screen • Sarasota had a 13% undervote for House, but 1. 3% for Governor • Charlotte had a 2. 4% undervote in the U. S. House race, 26% undervote for attorney general (would not have made a difference statewide). 41% undervote for Florida House District 71

Ballot Comparison SARASOTA CHARLOTTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 0. 7% UNDERVOTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 5. Ballot Comparison SARASOTA CHARLOTTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 0. 7% UNDERVOTE 4. 4% UNDERVOTE 5. 2% UNDERVOTE 26% UNDERVOTE

The Dent Memo (Nov. 3, 2006) The Dent Memo (Nov. 3, 2006)

Timeline • Nov. 3 • • Nov. 7 Nov. 8 Nov. 9 Nov. 13 Timeline • Nov. 3 • • Nov. 7 Nov. 8 Nov. 9 Nov. 13 Nov. 20 Nov. 21 Dec. 5 Sarasota SOE letter to precincts warning of potential to overlook the race Election Day Hell breaks loose with 15% undervote FL Sec’y of State announces audit Canvassing commission orders recount Canvassing commission certifies election Jennings sues in FL to contest election Voters sue for new election Florida forms source code task force

Timeline • Dec. 20 Jennings contests election in Congress • Dec. 26 Florida judge Timeline • Dec. 20 Jennings contests election in Congress • Dec. 26 Florida judge rules against source code access by Jennings • Jan. 4 Buchanan seated by House of Representatives • Jan. 4 Jennings appeals denial of source code access to Fla. Court of Appeal • Jan. 4 Rep. Millender-Mc. Donald urges Court of Appeal to expedite the case • Jan. 10 Court tells Millender-Mc. Donald to butt out • Feb. 14 House of Representatives forms Subcommittee on Elections • Feb. 23 Source code task force report released

Secretary of State Audit 1. Review of election, procedures, results, and certification examination 2. Secretary of State Audit 1. Review of election, procedures, results, and certification examination 2. Testing machines actually used in election and machines held aside as spares 3. Independent Source Code Review CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS

Post-Election Testing Results • • • The machines properly recorded votes The software was Post-Election Testing Results • • • The machines properly recorded votes The software was certified and unaltered The internal audit trail shows the undervotes No evidence of tampering or vote-dropping No evidence of vote-flipping

Source Code Task Force • Florida State University was prime contractor • Alec Yasinsac, Source Code Task Force • Florida State University was prime contractor • Alec Yasinsac, FSU – Director, Security and Assurance in Information Technology Lab • Ted Baker, FSU – Device drivers, hardware/software interaction • Matt Bishop, UC Davis – Author: Computer Security: Art & Science • • • Mike Burmeister, FSU Breno de Medeiros, FSU Michael Shamos, CMU Gary Tyson, FSU David Wagner, UC Berkeley Co-Director, SAIT Information security Voting systems examiner Architecture and compilers Secure software, e-voting

Ground Rules • Total independence from Secretary of State • All source code provided Ground Rules • Total independence from Secretary of State • All source code provided • Access to actual voting machines • Vendor furnished documentation and briefings • No confidentiality restriction for discoveries relevant to the District 13 race or any system flaws CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS

Evidence Considered • • • Source code Machine behavior Election statistics Ballot definition files Evidence Considered • • • Source code Machine behavior Election statistics Ballot definition files Ballot images, electronic files Election event logs Court filings, county documents Poll-worker logs of voter complaints News stories, blogs Did not review: firmware of I/O devices, 3 rd-party utility libraries CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS

i. Votronic Hardware Architecture Interrupt Touch Screen Controller PEB PIC Ballot Style Interrupt Touches i. Votronic Hardware Architecture Interrupt Touch Screen Controller PEB PIC Ballot Style Interrupt Touches RAM Display Data TF Processor Intel 386 EX Display Data Summary Data Ballot Images CF CF RAM Video Card Firmware EPROM Audio Ballots Compact Flash Ballot Images TRIPLY REDUNDANT TF – Terminal Flash Memory, PIC = Programmable Interrupt Controller, PEB – Personal Electronic Ballot CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 Removable components are pink Dashed lines are memory mappings COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS SOURCE: TASK FORCE REPORT

i. Votronic Software Architecture • NO operating system • Low-level and machine interface code i. Votronic Software Architecture • NO operating system • Low-level and machine interface code – Mostly C, some assembly language – all was available • Application code – All C • COTS – Very little, e. g. C libraries, driver for compact flash card

i. Votronic Software Properties • Good – – – No GOTOs No dynamic memory i. Votronic Software Properties • Good – – – No GOTOs No dynamic memory allocation No multithreading Single address space Not object-oriented, so no fragile base class problem After each voter, processor is reset, program reloaded from EPROM and variables re-initialized • Bad – – No high-level design Limited code readability Aging code base, numerous updates Global variables updated by main program and interrupt handlers

Technical Approach • Follow the evidence • Consider all proposed hypotheses • We traced Technical Approach • Follow the evidence • Consider all proposed hypotheses • We traced program execution 1. Voting machine initialization 2. Voter selections & screen review 3. Ballot image creation 4. Ballot image storage 5. Asynchronous system faults not associated with a voting phase. • Used Fortify Source Code Analysis (SCA) tool from Fortify Software CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS

Unanimous Findings • • Complete ballot was presented to each voter All selections presented Unanimous Findings • • Complete ballot was presented to each voter All selections presented on review screens All selections recorded to terminal flash memory All flash memory selections recorded to external media No queueing or stacking of interrupts No malware No time-sensitive code No serial race effect – Race A unaffected by race B for A≠B • No serial voter effect – Voter n unaffected by voters 1, …, n-1

Vote Flipping • Some voters reported vote-flipping • Voter presses the square next to Vote Flipping • Some voters reported vote-flipping • Voter presses the square next to a Democrat, but the square next to the Republican gets marked (Reported widely, especially Broward County, FL) • This is not caused by malware, but by miscalibrated touchscreens • How do we know? The problem goes away when the screens are recalibrated.

Touchscreens 1. Sensor 2. Controller 3. Software driver Touchscreens 1. Sensor 2. Controller 3. Software driver

Resistive Touchscreens 1. Polyester Film 2. Upper Resistive Circuit Layer 3. Conductive ITO (Indium-Tin Resistive Touchscreens 1. Polyester Film 2. Upper Resistive Circuit Layer 3. Conductive ITO (Indium-Tin Oxide, transparent metal coating) 4. Lower Resistive Circuit Layer 5. Insulating Dots 6. Glass/Acrylic Substrate 7. Touching the overlay surface causes the (2) Upper Resistive Circuit Layer to contact the (4) Lower Resistive Circuit Layer, producing a circuit switch from the activated area. 8. Touchscreen controller measures alternating voltages between the circuit layers (7) and converts them into the digital X and Y coordinates of the activated area.

Resistive Touchscreens • Screen is fed clock signals • Touching the screen creates voltage Resistive Touchscreens • Screen is fed clock signals • Touching the screen creates voltage dividers in two dimensions • Transient signals from the wires must be interpreted to determine (x, y) coordinates • Smoothing of the signal is required • This is done in software by a “smoothing filter” SOURCE: RICK DOWNS

Calibrating Touchscreens A circle on the display and in touchscreen coordinates SOURCE: WWW. EMBEDDED. Calibrating Touchscreens A circle on the display and in touchscreen coordinates SOURCE: WWW. EMBEDDED. COM

The Smoothing Filter • The i. Votronic smoothing filter was slow, sometimes 3 seconds The Smoothing Filter • The i. Votronic smoothing filter was slow, sometimes 3 seconds until a touch was registered • Florida’s primary election was on September 5, 2006 • About August 21, 2006, the Sarasota Supervisor of Elections received a letter from the vendor advising of the slow response and suggesting either: – Installing a new version with a faster filter; or – Alerting the voters to the slow response • Sarasota did neither for the primary or the November election

The ES&S Letter (condensed) The ES&S Letter (condensed)

The Smoothing Filter Hypothesis • It is now alleged that the smoothing filter was The Smoothing Filter Hypothesis • It is now alleged that the smoothing filter was the cause of the undervote • Theory: Voters pressed “Jennings. ” This did not register immediately, so they pressed it again. This had the effect of selecting and then deselecting Jennings. • Plausible but incorrect: – Interrupts (touches) are not queued. Only the last touch takes effect. If a voter touches again before the first touch registers, the second one registers, does not cancel the first. – If the effect existed, it would have affected other races in Sarasota and other jurisdictions. – If the effect were widespread (15%), it would have been observed in testing, but was not.

What Caused the Undervote? • Bad ballot design COMBINED WITH ineffective undervote warning • What Caused the Undervote? • Bad ballot design COMBINED WITH ineffective undervote warning • WHY DO WE BELIEVE THIS? • No other hypothesis is confirmed by the facts • WHAT IS THE FIX? • Do not allow exit from an undervoted screen without warning and express confirmation • EFFECT ON PENNSYLVANIA? • Vendor will not receive any new certification until all vulnerabilities and the undervote warning are repaired

Aftermath Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be Aftermath Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardon'd, and some punishèd; For never was a story of more note Than this of Jennings and her undervote.

Q&A CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS Q&A CYLAB/ISR SEMINAR APRIL 16, 2007 COPYRIGHT © 2007 MICHAEL I. SHAMOS