Скачать презентацию WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF SERVICE DOGS THE Скачать презентацию WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF SERVICE DOGS THE

32862242c0738af76e565895bcf0b2d1.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 111

WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF SERVICE DOGS THE WHO, WHAT, WHY, AND WHERE OF WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF SERVICE DOGS THE WHO, WHAT, WHY, AND WHERE OF SERVICE DOGS

Host – Cindy Sanford Helper - Heidi • Cindy: has had dogs for 30 Host – Cindy Sanford Helper - Heidi • Cindy: has had dogs for 30 years, multiples for 28 Attended TCA, a 3 month residential training program, graduated in Spring 2005 • Fostering dogs since 2007 • Board/train since 2007 • Instructing at PSC since 2011 • Attended Service Dog, Inc & DAD seminars 2013 • CGC evaluator, CTDI • Heidi – Zoo Tech, pre-vet, helper for 2 years

Program of Events • • Intros Legal Information concerning Service Dogs Break Guest Speakers: Program of Events • • Intros Legal Information concerning Service Dogs Break Guest Speakers: can be seen on youtube or PSC website • Break • Obtaining and Training Service Dogs • Questions welcome throughout!

Most dogs can help, but few can be Service Dogs! Most dogs can help, but few can be Service Dogs!

SERVICE DOG TERMS • Assistance Dog • Autism Assistance Dog • Diabetic Alert Dog SERVICE DOG TERMS • Assistance Dog • Autism Assistance Dog • Diabetic Alert Dog (DAD) • Emotional Support Dog (ESA/D) • Guide/Seeing Eye Dog • Helper Dog • • • Hearing/Signal Dog House Helper Medical Alert Dog Mobility Dog Psychiatric/PTSD Service Dog (PSD) • Service Dog (SD) • Therapy Dog • Working Dog

Service Dog Definitions • Therapy, animal assisted • Synonymous: helper, therapy and animal assistance, Service Dog Definitions • Therapy, animal assisted • Synonymous: helper, therapy and animal assistance, service assisted activity – NOT • Descriptive: guide, autism, trained to mitigate a medical alert, mobility, specific person’s PSD, PTSD, DAD, full disability, in public places public access by invitation • House helper – often not • Emotional Support Animal – person feels better, HBP, suitable for public access anxiety, etc, no trained work task, no federal public • Working – usually police, access rights, covered search/rescue, access only under FHA/HUD and in line of duty most airlines

GENERAL TERMS/PHRASES • • Certification Gate Keeper Mitigate a Disability Owner-Trainer Person with Disability GENERAL TERMS/PHRASES • • Certification Gate Keeper Mitigate a Disability Owner-Trainer Person with Disability (PWD) Program Dog Public Access

Terms/Phrases Defined • Certification – • Person with Disability – documentation animal is a Terms/Phrases Defined • Certification – • Person with Disability – documentation animal is a PWD – as defined by service dog with advanced ADA training and tasks specific to PWD – NOT required • Program Dog – obtained from a service dog training under federal law organization, usually fully • Gate keeper – storekeeper, trained employee that allows/disallows acces • Public Access – person has right of access with • Mitigate a disability – for the particular PWD, a SD to all places normally trained task accessible to the general • Owner-trainer – trains own public, dog can be denied service dog in some circumstances

SERVICE DOG REGULATIONS • Americans with • Justice Department Disabilities Act (ADA) (DOJ), the SERVICE DOG REGULATIONS • Americans with • Justice Department Disabilities Act (ADA) (DOJ), the Federal prohibits discrimination on Executive Department the basis of disability responsible for administration and • ADA title I applies to enforcement of justice. employment • Section 504 of the • ADA title II applies to Rehabilitation Act of 1973 public entities(state and protect the rights of local govt’s) PWD’s in programs and • Title III applies to public activities that receive accommodations and federal funds public facilities

IMPORTANT GOVERNMENT REGS • US CODE – TITLE 40 • U. S. C. Public IMPORTANT GOVERNMENT REGS • US CODE – TITLE 40 • U. S. C. Public Buildings, Property, and Works Subtitle II -Concerning admittance to Federal buildings • • United States Code (USC) at uscode. house. gov • Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at http: //www. gpo. gov/fdsys Title 38 U. S. C. 17. 148 - Concerning Dept of Veteran’s Affairs – Medical – Concerning Acquiring Service Dogs as VA-funded medical equipment U. S. Dept Of Housing & Urban Development - Sect 504 – Defines ADA as applied to Federally subsidized housing

IMPORTANT GOVERNMENT REGS • ADA – 28 CFR parts 35 and 36, also 39, IMPORTANT GOVERNMENT REGS • ADA – 28 CFR parts 35 and 36, also 39, 41, 42 • Federal regulation concerning rights of disabled persons established by the Department of Justice published in the Federal Register in the Civil Rights Division, Disability Rights Section • title II (State and local government services) and title III (stores, restaurants, theaters, hairdressers ) • Defines ‘service animal’; how and where they are allowed; behavior of animal, handler, and various public entities, i. e. public and private businesses and their gatekeepers. Part 35 subpart B – 35. 136

Title II • The title II regulation covers Title II • The title II regulation covers "public entities. " Subpart G - 35. 190 designated agencies • "Public entities" include any State or local government and any of its departments, agencies, or other instrumentalities. All activities, services, and programs of public entities are covered, including activities of State legislatures and courts, town meetings, police and fire departments, motor vehicle licensing, and employment.

28 CFR 35 subpart B 35. 130 (7) • A public entity shall make 28 CFR 35 subpart B 35. 130 (7) • A public entity shall make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures…unless the public entity can demonstrate that making the modifications would fundamentally alter the nature of the service, program, or activity.

Title III • 28 CFR part 36 subpart F Title III regulation covers: • Title III • 28 CFR part 36 subpart F Title III regulation covers: • Public accommodations (i. e. , private entities that own, operate, lease, or lease to places of public accommodation) • Commercial facilities • Private entities that offer certain examinations and courses related to educational and occupational certification. .

Title III, cont’d • Places of public accommodation such as restaurants, hotels, theaters, convention Title III, cont’d • Places of public accommodation such as restaurants, hotels, theaters, convention centers, retail stores, shopping centers, dry cleaners, laundromats, pharmacies, doctors' offices, hospitals, museums, libraries, parks, zoos, amusement parks, private schools, day care centers, health spas, and bowling alleys. Commercial facilities are nonresidential facilities, including office buildings, factories, and warehouses, whose operations affect commerce.

Title III, cont’d • Entities controlled by religious organizations, including places of worship, are Title III, cont’d • Entities controlled by religious organizations, including places of worship, are not covered. • Private clubs are not covered, except to the extent that the facilities of the private club are made available to customers or patrons of a place of public accommodation.

28 CFR pt 36. 302 Modifications limitations • Section 36. 302(c)(1) of the final 28 CFR pt 36. 302 Modifications limitations • Section 36. 302(c)(1) of the final rule now provides that “[g]enerally, a public accommodation shall modify policies, practices, and procedures to permit the use of a service animal by an individual with a disability. ” This formulation reflects the general intent of Congress that public accommodations take the necessary steps to accommodate service animals and to ensure that individuals with disabilities are not separated from their service animals.

 • It is intended that the broadest feasible access be provided to service • It is intended that the broadest feasible access be provided to service animals in all places of public accommodation, including movie theaters, restaurants, hotels, retail stores, hospitals, and nursing homes. The section also acknowledges, however, that, in rare circumstances, accommodation of service animals may not be required because a fundamental alteration would result in the nature of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, or accommodations offered or provided, or the safe operation of the public accommodation would be jeopardized.

 • As specified in § 36. 302(c)(2), the rule does not require a • As specified in § 36. 302(c)(2), the rule does not require a public accommodation to supervise or care for any service animal. If a service animal must be separated from an individual with a disability in order to avoid a fundamental alteration or a threat to safety, it is the responsibility of the individual with the disability to arrange for the care and supervision of the animal during the period of separation.

 • Example: A museum would not be required to modify a policy barring • Example: A museum would not be required to modify a policy barring the touching of delicate works of art in order to enhance the participation of individuals who are blind, if the touching threatened the integrity of the work. Damage to a museum piece would clearly be a fundamental alteration that is not required by this section.

VA and Service Dogs • 38 CFR 17 – defines what type of SD’s VA and Service Dogs • 38 CFR 17 – defines what type of SD’s the VA will pay benefits for, what benefits are and are not included, where covered(financed) dogs must be acquired, does not authorize actual purchase of a dog • Does not bar SD’s or require a veteran to use only covered dogs • Does not cover PSD’s, but PSD’s are allowed to enter facilities

VA, cont’d • To be financed by the VA: • The veteran must be VA, cont’d • To be financed by the VA: • The veteran must be diagnosed as having a visual, hearing, or substantial mobility impairment; and • it is optimal for the veteran to manage the impairment and live independently through the assistance of a trained service dog. • Note: If other means (such as technological devices or rehabilitative therapy) will provide the same level of independence, then VA will not authorize benefits under this section.

VA, cont’d • For this section, substantial mobility impairment means a spinal cord injury VA, cont’d • For this section, substantial mobility impairment means a spinal cord injury or dysfunction or other chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility. A chronic impairment that substantially limits mobility includes but is not limited to a traumatic brain injury that compromises a veteran's ability to make appropriate decisions based on environmental cues (i. e. , traffic lights or dangerous obstacles) or a seizure disorder that causes a veteran to become immobile during and after a seizure event.

VA, cont’d • The dog and veteran must have successfully completed a training program VA, cont’d • The dog and veteran must have successfully completed a training program offered by an organization accredited by Assistance Dogs International or the International Guide Dog Federation, or both (for dogs that perform both service- and guide-dog assistance). The veteran must provide to VA a certificate showing successful completion issued by the accredited organization that provided such program.

Action: Final rule. Document Citation: 77 FR 54368 CFR: 38 CFR 17 The Rule Action: Final rule. Document Citation: 77 FR 54368 CFR: 38 CFR 17 The Rule Does Not Deny Access of Any Service Dog to VA Health Care Facilities • A certificate is required under § 17. 148(c)(1) only to enable the veteran to receive service dog benefits, but is not required to gain entry to VA facilities. This rulemaking does not permit or prohibit the access of service dogs to VA health care facilities. • Access to VA facilities by service dogs accompanying individuals with disabilities is controlled by 40 U. S. C. 3103, which states:

 • “Guide dogs or other service animals accompanying individuals with disabilities and especially • “Guide dogs or other service animals accompanying individuals with disabilities and especially trained and educated for that purpose shall be admitted to any building or other property owned or controlled by the Federal Government on the same terms and conditions, and subject to the same regulations, as generally govern the admission of the public to the property. ” • Discussion of certification requirements at: https: //www. federalregister. gov/articles/2012/09/0 5/2012 -21784/service-dogs#table_of_contents

GOVERNMENT REGS, cont’d • If the ADA regulations permit a higher level of access GOVERNMENT REGS, cont’d • If the ADA regulations permit a higher level of access for the disabled person, it takes precedence over State or local regulations, however, State or local DO NOT take precedence over Federal laws • NOTE: It is the PERSON that has the right to access, and the PERSON chooses to use a dog as an assistive device, it is NOT the DOG that has access rights! • Federal Fair Housing Act administered by HUD http: //portal. hud. gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc ? id=servanimals_ntcfheo 2013 -01. pdf

 Title 28: PART 35— Subpart A—General § 35. 104 Definitions • Disability means, Title 28: PART 35— Subpart A—General § 35. 104 Definitions • Disability means, with respect to an individual, a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such individual; a record of such an impairment; or being regarded as having such an impairment. • (1)(i) The phrase physical or mental impairment means—

 • (A) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting • (A) Any physiological disorder or condition, cosmetic disfigurement, or anatomical loss affecting one or more of the following body systems: Neurological, musculoskeletal, special sense organs, respiratory (including speech organs), cardiovascular, reproductive, digestive, genitourinary, hemic and lymphatic, skin, and endocrine; • (B) Any mental or psychological disorder such as mental retardation, organic brain syndrome, emotional or mental illness, and specific learning disabilities.

 • (ii) The phrase physical or mental impairment includes, but is not limited • (ii) The phrase physical or mental impairment includes, but is not limited to, such contagious and noncontagious diseases and conditions as orthopedic, visual, speech and hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, mental retardation, emotional illness, specific learning disabilities, HIV disease (whether symptomatic or asymptomatic), tuberculosis, drug addiction, and alcoholism. • (iii) The phrase physical or mental impairment does not include homosexuality or bisexuality.

 • (2) The phrase major life activities means functions such as caring for • (2) The phrase major life activities means functions such as caring for one's self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working. • (3) The phrase has a record of such an impairment means has a history of, or has been misclassified as having, a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. • (4) The phrase is regarded as having an impairment means—

 • (i) Has a physical or mental impairment that does not substantially limit • (i) Has a physical or mental impairment that does not substantially limit major life activities but that is treated by a public entity as constituting such a limitation; • (ii) Has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits major life activities only as a result of the attitudes of others toward such impairment; or • (iii) Has none of the impairments defined in paragraph (1) of this definition but is treated by a public entity as having such an impairment.

 • (5) The term disability does not include— • (i) Transvestism, transsexualism, pedophilia, • (5) The term disability does not include— • (i) Transvestism, transsexualism, pedophilia, exhibitionism, voyeurism, gender identity disorders not resulting from physical impairments, or other sexual behavior disorders; • (ii) Compulsive gambling, kleptomania, or pyromania; or • (iii) Psychoactive substance use disorders resulting from current illegal use of drugs.

28 CFR pt 36 definitions • Contains 12 pages discussing what constitutes a service 28 CFR pt 36 definitions • Contains 12 pages discussing what constitutes a service animal – worth reading if you want to be informed and able to discuss topic in depth • Discusses ‘service animal’ and species of animals, defines protection and doing work/tasks, discusses ESA’s and PSD’s as applied to public access and coverage

HUD – Title 24 - PART 5 Subpart C—Pet Ownership…Persons With Disabilities • § HUD – Title 24 - PART 5 Subpart C—Pet Ownership…Persons With Disabilities • § 5. 303 Exclusion for animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. • (a) Subpart C does not apply to animals that are used to assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities. Project owners and PHAs may not apply or enforce any policies established under this subpart against animals that are necessary as a reasonable accommodation to assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities.

HUD, cont’d • This exclusion applies to animals that reside in projects for the HUD, cont’d • This exclusion applies to animals that reside in projects for the elderly or PWD’s, as well as to animals that visit these projects. • (b) Nothing in this subpart C: • (1) Limits or impairs the rights of PWD’s; • (2) Authorizes project owners or PHAs to limit or impair the rights of persons with disabilities; or • (3) Affects any authority that project owners or PHAs may have to regulate animals that assist, support, or provide service to persons with disabilities, under federal, state, or local law.

HUD, cont’d • § 5. 306 Definitions. • Common household pet means: • (1) HUD, cont’d • § 5. 306 Definitions. • Common household pet means: • (1) For purposes of Housing programs: (a list of common domesticated pet animals)… If this definition conflicts with any applicable State or local law or regulation defining the pets that may be owned or kept in dwelling accommodations, the State or local law or regulation shall apply. This definition shall not include animals that are used to assist persons with disabilities. (No breed restrictions)

The Federal Register • The Federal Register is the official, daily record of the The Federal Register • The Federal Register is the official, daily record of the Federal Government that contains government agency rules, proposed rules, and public notices. The final rules promulgated by a federal agency and published in the FR are ultimately reorganized by topic or subject matter and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations(CFR), which is updated annually. that contains government agency rules, proposed rules, and public notices. [1]

An Idea About Law Life • Congress passes a law, • It goes for An Idea About Law Life • Congress passes a law, • It goes for review at the Office of Law Revision for exhaustive review of existing US Codes • Once the classifications are finalized for a bill and a public law number is assigned by the Office of the Federal Register, the classifications are published in the Classification Table • Every six years, public laws are incorporated into the United States Code

Lawmaking, cont’d • Federal agencies are authorized to promulgate regulations based off the US Lawmaking, cont’d • Federal agencies are authorized to promulgate regulations based off the US Codes • Proposed rules are published in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking(NPRM), for comments and participation in the decisionmaking, and adoption and publication of the final rule, via the Federal Register • The rules and regulations are published in the Federal Register and the E-CFR (an unofficial online version published w/in 2 days after changes that have been published in the Federal Register become effective)

Where do I find the Federal Laws? ? ? • Two places to access Where do I find the Federal Laws? ? ? • Two places to access information: • for what looks like a scan of hard copy (very hard to use) at: http: //www. gpo. gov/fdsys/ • E-CFR is MUCH easier to use and highlights your search criteria at: http: //www. ecfr. gov

More about Laws • Many sections in the Code are followed by editorial notes. More about Laws • Many sections in the Code are followed by editorial notes. These notes are prepared by the Code editors. They provide information about the section's source, derivation, history, references, translations, effectiveness and applicability, codification, defined terms, prospective amendments, and related matters. • Plain language law: www. law. cornell. edu • https: //www. federalregister. gov/uploads/2011/01/t he_rulemaking_process. pdf The Rulemaking Process (NOT ON HANDOUT)

14 CFR part 382 - (DOT) rules about SD’s on flights Subpart H—Services on 14 CFR part 382 - (DOT) rules about SD’s on flights Subpart H—Services on Aircraft • § 382. 117 Must carriers permit passengers with a disability to travel with service animals? • (a) As a carrier, you must permit a service animal to accompany a passenger with a disability. • (1) You must not deny transportation to a service animal on the basis that its carriage may offend or annoy carrier personnel or persons traveling on the aircraft.

Miscellaneous laws • 14 CFR part 382 -Department of Transportation (DOT) rules about SD’s Miscellaneous laws • 14 CFR part 382 -Department of Transportation (DOT) rules about SD’s on flights • Title 49 – SD’s on Vessels

FAA, cont’d • (2) On a flight segment scheduled to take 8 hours or FAA, cont’d • (2) On a flight segment scheduled to take 8 hours or more, you may, as a condition of permitting a service animal to travel in the cabin, require the passenger using the service animal to provide documentation that the animal will not need to relieve itself on the flight or that the animal can relieve itself in a way that does not create a health or sanitation issue on the flight.

FAA, cont’d • (b) You must permit the service animal to accompany the passenger FAA, cont’d • (b) You must permit the service animal to accompany the passenger with a disability at any seat in which the passenger sits, unless the animal obstructs an aisle or other area that must remain unobstructed to facilitate an emergency evacuation. • (c) If a service animal cannot be accommodated at the seat location of the passenger with a disability who is using the animal, you must offer the passenger the opportunity to move with the animal to another seat location, if present on the aircraft, where the animal can be accommodated.

FAA, cont’d • you must accept identification cards, other written documentation, presence of harnesses, FAA, cont’d • you must accept identification cards, other written documentation, presence of harnesses, tags, or the credible verbal assurances of a qualified individual with a disability using the animal. • (e) ESA or PSA, must have current documentation on the letterhead of a licensed mental health professional stating the following: • (1) psgr has a mental or emotional disability recognized in the DSM IV; • (2) The psgr needs the ESA/PSA service animal for air travel and/or for activity at the psgr's destination;

FAA, cont’d • (3) person assessing is a licensed mental health professional, and the FAA, cont’d • (3) person assessing is a licensed mental health professional, and the psngr is under his or her professional care; and • (4) The mental health professional's license, etc • Misc regs: • Subpart G—§ 382. 91 (c) As a carrier at a U. S. airport, you must, on request, in cooperation with the airport operator, provide for escorting a passenger with a service animal to an animal relief area provided under § 382. 51(a)(5) of this part.

FAA, cont’d • (c) a passenger with a disability may need to provide up FAA, cont’d • (c) a passenger with a disability may need to provide up to 48 hours' advance notice and check in one hour before the check-in time for the general public to receive: (8) Transportation of an emotional support or psychiatric service animal in the cabin; • (9) Transportation of a service animal on a flight segment scheduled to take 8 hours or more

TSA SD Rules • both the passenger and the service dog will be screened TSA SD Rules • both the passenger and the service dog will be screened • and they should not be separated from their dogs by TSA personnel. • If both screened by a metal detector, they can proceed one of three ways: • The psngr through first with dog following behind on its leash. • dog walk through first on leash w/psngr following behind. • both can walk through at the same time.

TSA, cont’d • dog will receive additional screening of all equipment • http: //www. TSA, cont’d • dog will receive additional screening of all equipment • http: //www. tsa. gov/travelerinformation/passengers-service-dogs

IMPORTANT FLORIDA STATE REGS • FLORIDA STATUTE 413. 08 - Rights of an individual IMPORTANT FLORIDA STATE REGS • FLORIDA STATUTE 413. 08 - Rights of an individual with a disability; use of a service animal. Covers public access rights and responsibilities and housing. • Florida Housing housinghttp: //portal. hud. gov/hudportal/HUD? src= /states/florida/renting/tenantrights

 • Florida Commission on Human Relations (HR) at http: //fchr. state. fl. us/fchr • Florida Commission on Human Relations (HR) at http: //fchr. state. fl. us/fchr • The Commission is the state agency that enforces the state’s civil rights laws and serves as a resource on HR for the people of Florida. It is against Florida law to discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, marital status or familial status.

 • The Commission investigates complaints of discrimination in the areas of employment, housing, • The Commission investigates complaints of discrimination in the areas of employment, housing, public accommodations and state employee whistle -blower retaliation. • The Commission is responsible for promoting fair treatment, equal opportunity and mutual respect among members of all economic, social, racial, religious and ethnic groups and works to eliminate discrimination against groups and their members.

 • The 2013 Florida Statutes Title XVII MILITARY AFFAIRS AND RELATED MATTERS • • The 2013 Florida Statutes Title XVII MILITARY AFFAIRS AND RELATED MATTERS • Chapter 252 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT • 252. 355 Registry of persons with special needs; notice. — “(3) A person with special needs must be allowed to bring his or her Service animal into a special needs shelter in accordance with s. 413. 08.

FLORIDA Title XXIII MOTOR VEHICLES Chapter 316 STATE UNIFORM TRAFFIC CONTROL • 316. 1303 Traffic FLORIDA Title XXIII MOTOR VEHICLES Chapter 316 STATE UNIFORM TRAFFIC CONTROL • 316. 1303 Traffic regulations to assist mobilityimpaired persons. —(1) Whenever a pedestrian who is mobility impaired is in the process of crossing a public street or highway with the assistance of a GD or service animal designated as such with a visible means of identification…, the driver of a vehicle approaching the intersection, … shall bring his or her vehicle to a full stop before arriving at the intersection and, before proceeding, shall take precautions necessary to avoid injuring the pedestrian.

MV, cont’d • (f) If a violation of s. 316. 1301 or s. 316. 1303 MV, cont’d • (f) If a violation of s. 316. 1301 or s. 316. 1303 results in an injury to the pedestrian or damage to the property of the pedestrian, an additional fine of up to $250 shall be paid. This amount must be distributed pursuant to s. 318. 21.

Interference With or Injuring a SD • Title XXX Social Welfare Ch 413 Voc Interference With or Injuring a SD • Title XXX Social Welfare Ch 413 Voc Rehab • 413. 081 Interference with or injury to a Service animal(SA); penalties; restitution. —(1) A person who, with reckless disregard, interferes with, or permits a dog that s/he owns or is in the immediate control of to interfere with, the use of a SA by obstructing, intimidating, or otherwise jeopardizing the safety of the SA or its user commits a misdemeanor of the second degree for the first offense and a misdemeanor of the first degree for each subsequent offense, punishable as provided in s. 775. 082 or s. 775. 083

 • . (2) A person who, with reckless disregard, injures or kills, or permits • . (2) A person who, with reckless disregard, injures or kills, or permits a dog that he or she owns or is in the immediate control of to injure or kill, a SA commits a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775. 082 or s. 775. 083. (3) A person who intentionally injures or kills, or permits a dog that he or she owns or is in the immediate control of to injure or kill, a SA commits a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775. 082, s. 775. 083, or s. 775. 084. (4)(a) A person who is convicted of a violation of this section, in addition to any other penalty, must make full restitution for all damages that arise out of or are related to the offense,

 • including incidental and consequential damages incurred by the SA’s user. (b) Restitution includes • including incidental and consequential damages incurred by the SA’s user. (b) Restitution includes the value of the SA; replacement and training or retraining expenses for the SA and the user; veterinary and other medical and boarding expenses for the SA; medical expenses for the user; and lost wages or income incurred by the user during any period that the user is without the SERVICEs of the SA. History. —s. 2, ch. 2002176; s. 2, ch. 2005 -63.

Florida Penalties • 775. 082 • (d) For a felony of the third degree, by Florida Penalties • 775. 082 • (d) For a felony of the third degree, by a term of imprisonment not exceeding 5 years. • 4) (a) For a misdemeanor of the first degree, by a definite term of imprisonment not exceeding 1 year; (b) For a misdemeanor of the second degree, by a definite term of imprisonment not exceeding 60 days.

 • . 775. 083 OR FINE OF: c) $5, 000, for a felony of • . 775. 083 OR FINE OF: c) $5, 000, for a felony of the third degree(d) $1, 000, for a misdemeanor of the first degree. (e) $500, for a misdemeanor of the second degree or a noncriminal violation. • 775. 084 is for repeat offenders

More SD resources • JAN is one of several services provided by the U. More SD resources • JAN is one of several services provided by the U. S. Department of Labor's Office of Disability Employment Policy(ODEP). The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) has guidance on workplace employment issues • Assistance Dogs International (ADI) • International Association of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP) • Pet Partners (was Delta Society) • Michigan State U School of Law – state-by-state table of laws: http: //animallaw. info/

Service Dog Organizations • Pet Partners • International Assoc of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP) Service Dog Organizations • Pet Partners • International Assoc of Assistance Dog Partners (IAADP) • Assistance Dogs International, Inc (ADI)

Pet Partners • Started in 1977 • “Pet Partners promotes and demonstrates that positive Pet Partners • Started in 1977 • “Pet Partners promotes and demonstrates that positive human–animal interactions improve the physical, emotional and psychological lives of those we serve” • Please note: Pet Partners does not train or place service dogs. • For owners and professionals interested in therapy animals, owners/family/supporters of SD users, and anyone interested in the human/animal bond

Pet Partners cont’d • Website has a trainer search function. Trainers input their own Pet Partners cont’d • Website has a trainer search function. Trainers input their own information, PP does not certify, verify or endorse any trainer listed. The National Service Dog Resource Center is a web-based PP program, providing information and resources for people with disabilities, as well as their friends and family, who are considering getting a service animal or who are currently partnered with a service animal. The NSDRC also provides resources for people with disabilities who have access problems entering the workplace and other public places with their service animals

International Assoc of Assistance Dog Partners - IAADP • Started in 1993 • provide International Assoc of Assistance Dog Partners - IAADP • Started in 1993 • provide service dog partners with a voice in the service dog field; enable partners with service dogs to work together on issues of mutual concern; foster the handler/dog partnership. • It is for: partners with SD's, people in the process of training their own SD, supporters of persons with SD's, and providers of SD's

IAADP, cont’d • IAADP primarily represents and advocates for people with disabilities working with IAADP, cont’d • IAADP primarily represents and advocates for people with disabilities working with service dogs. In addition, anyone with a personal or professional interest in the assistance dog community is welcome to join as a Friend or Provider • non profit partnership support network that is an independent cross-disability consumer organization that could represent all Assistance Dog Partners (not just one faction) and advance consumer interests in the assistance dog field.

IAADP, cont’d • IAADP Minimum Training Standards for Public Access • minimum of one IAADP, cont’d • IAADP Minimum Training Standards for Public Access • minimum of one hundred twenty (120) hours of training over a period of six months or more. At least thirty (30) hours should be devoted to outings that will prepare the dog to work obediently and unobtrusively in public places. • These hours should be documented in a training journal, including dates and locations. • This documentation contributes to proof the dog is specially trained as a service dog.

IAADP, cont’d • Manners: Your dog must acquire proper social behavior skills. This includes IAADP, cont’d • Manners: Your dog must acquire proper social behavior skills. This includes at a minimum: • No aggressive behavior toward people or other animals - no biting, no snapping, no growling, no lunging and/or barking; • No begging for food or petting from other people; • No sniffing merchandise or people who pass by; • No urinating or defecating in public unless given a command / signal to toilet in an appropriate place. • Disability Related Tasks: dog must be individually trained to perform identifiable physical tasks to mitigate handler’s disability

Assistance Dogs International, Inc - ADI • Started in 1986 • ADI is for Assistance Dogs International, Inc - ADI • Started in 1986 • ADI is for the Service Dog providers • Membership of ADI is open only to programs that have been accredited by ADI • To be listed in the directory and organization/trainer must be accredited by ADI or the International Guide Dog federation • VA-supported service dogs must be from an ADI organization • Does not have quality assurance program after organization becomes accredited

ADI, cont’d • The purpose of ADI is to improve the areas of training, ADI, cont’d • The purpose of ADI is to improve the areas of training, placement, and utilization of assistance dogs, staff and volunteer education, as well as educating the public about assistance dogs and advocating for the legal rights of people with disabilities partnered with assistance dogs. • is a worldwide coalition of non profit programs that specialize in training dogs to perform tasks that empower disabled persons to increase their safety, independence and quality of life.

ADI, cont’d • ADI Minimum Standards for Assistance Dogs in Public: • Dog is ADI, cont’d • ADI Minimum Standards for Assistance Dogs in Public: • Dog is clean, well-groomed and does not have an offensive odor. • Does not relieve itself in inappropriate locations. • Dog does not: • Solicit attention or Disrupt the normal business • Vocalize (barking, growling or whining) • Show aggression • Steal food or other items

ADI, cont’d • Training: • Dog is specifically trained to perform 3 or more ADI, cont’d • Training: • Dog is specifically trained to perform 3 or more tasks to mitigate aspects of the client's disability • Dog works calmly and quietly on harness, leash or other tether • Dog is able to perform its tasks in public • Dog must be able to lie quietly beside the handler without blocking aisles, doorways, etc. • Dog stays within 24" of handler at all times unless the nature of a trained task requires otherwise

Owner-trainer Resources • Team. Work and Team. Work II by Stewart Nordensson - from Owner-trainer Resources • Team. Work and Team. Work II by Stewart Nordensson - from many sources • Lend Me An Ear by Martha Hoffman – available from many sources • The Bow. Wow clicker training series by Virginia Broitman - available from takeabowwow. com • Clicker Train Your Own Assistance Dog by Barbara Handleman - available from many sources • Many others, these are particular ones I know and have used

Local Resources • Five Flags Dog • Many local trainers Training Club – group Local Resources • Five Flags Dog • Many local trainers Training Club – group that offer group classes and several • Your Dog’s Business – private trainers private lessons in basic familiar with service to advanced obedience dog task training or in public settings providing group classes • Cheryl Gieble • Pet. Smart and Petco Peterson at PSC Gulf basic thru CGC Breeze – Hearing dogs training and some have private lessons for some task training

Developing your Training Team • Family, friends willing to help with basics or take Developing your Training Team • Family, friends willing to help with basics or take pup/dog in public if you can’t • Will your employer allow a SDIT in for a short time and is there someone to take it home • Will you need a private trainer at times • Interview your trainer: • Experience with SD or advanced public work, such as therapy dog or at least CGC • Training methods you are comfortable with • Will they allow you to preview a class • Able to work WITH you at YOUR speed

The ‘Perfect’ Dog • Doesn’t exist except in the owner’s eyes • Forgiving • The ‘Perfect’ Dog • Doesn’t exist except in the owner’s eyes • Forgiving • Respects your space • If it jumps on you, the legs are not stiff • Continues to interact when let out of run • Checks in frequently • No anal contact • Prefers the company of people • Quick recovery time from strange people and noises • Comfortable on varied surfaces • Soft eyes, moves gently away from stare test

The ‘Perfect’ Dog, cont’d • Doesn’t continuously • Keep in mind, after stare into The ‘Perfect’ Dog, cont’d • Doesn’t continuously • Keep in mind, after stare into the distance adoption there is roughly a 2 – 4 week • Will retrieve an item honeymoon, that the • Is not afraid of a dog will ‘decompress’ backpack or similar from the stressful item, may back up but environment, and then advances and personality may checks it out change drastically • A dog that has had several changes will be • Will shelter let you foster the dog? less flexible and be withdrawn

Searching Breeders • If you have decided you want a specific breed, research breed Searching Breeders • If you have decided you want a specific breed, research breed faults/characteristics • Get references from breed clubs if you can (PDFA in Pensacola), or owners of excellent examples of the breed that you may know. • Know the difference between a show line and a working line in your chosen breed • Be very cautious of getting a dog from a ‘backyard breeder’ or the neighbor down the street • Be cautious of ‘saving’ a puppy from a puppy mill situation or buying from a pet store

Breeders, cont’d • Interview potential sources for what they breed for, work or show, Breeders, cont’d • Interview potential sources for what they breed for, work or show, coat, temperament, personality • Do they temperament test litters • Will they let you have first or second pick • Do they have a contract and what does the contract specify (alter required or done with breeder approval), will they take a dog back if it doesn’t work out, do they retain ownership of dogs of show quality • Do they have older dogs that may meet your needs • Have they had a dog that did therapy/service work

Caveats Two years is a VERY LONG TIME to wait and see if a Caveats Two years is a VERY LONG TIME to wait and see if a dog is going to work out! • You need to objectively assess your activity level, patience and time constraints • Personality/developmental changes in dog can be trying • What are your plans if the pup doesn’t work out? • What is the working lifespan of the breed you’ve selected? • What will you do with the retired dog?

Searching the Shelters • Take someone else with you, preferably someone that likes a Searching the Shelters • Take someone else with you, preferably someone that likes a different type dog than you do • After the first trial run at a shelter to discuss what you both saw, the two of you may want to split up and take separate notes, then evaluate the ones you agree on or feel strongly about • The future partner should be the one the dog interacts with most, the helper can observe and take notes • Be up-front with shelter, some uninformed rescues don’t want their dogs going to a working home

Searching, cont’d • Be prepared to spend quite a while in your quest! Service Searching, cont’d • Be prepared to spend quite a while in your quest! Service Dogs, Inc spends a couple months visiting shelters all over Texas. They evaluate around 3, 000 dogs to find 65 to evaluate further, to find 18 that might make it through the program! They have what is considered a good success rate because they evaluate well and are VERY choosy.

Searching, cont’d • Breed rescues can be great sources, you see the adult dog, Searching, cont’d • Breed rescues can be great sources, you see the adult dog, may have a good idea of issues, dogs are often in foster homes so there is extra input from foster parent. Often more expensive to adopt. • Some rescue dogs may have medical issues that make service work difficult

Searching, cont’d • Know the characteristics of breeds you don’t want – long back, Searching, cont’d • Know the characteristics of breeds you don’t want – long back, tail that whips completely side-to-side might be Pitbull X; thick hair, spots on tongue could be Chow X; extra dewclaws on rear feet could be Newfoundland X, etc • Shelters usually don’t want to put down dogs of certain breeds, so will call PB x’s ‘boxer mixes’ or leave out completely what undesirable mix a dog could be and concentrate on a ‘nicer’ type • Be cautious of DNA tests, they are far from perfect • Large breeds typically have shorter working lives

SELECTING A SERVICE DOG Check list for cruising shelters Complete prior to going to SELECTING A SERVICE DOG Check list for cruising shelters Complete prior to going to shelter • I do not want a dog that is (one or two major issues)_________ • I want a dog that is: Small, Medium Large • I want a dog with: short hair, medium hair, long hair; sheds a little, doesn’t shed, sheds a lot(I like brushing every day)

 • I Do Not want this color/type of dog: ____ • I want • I Do Not want this color/type of dog: ____ • I want a dog that is (choose what fits the dog you would like to have): • Serious, Calm, Dependable, Slow and methodical, Energetic, Playful, Fun-loving and goofy, Brave, Forgiving, Attentive, Smart, Trusting, Assertive, Talkative, Excitable and bouncy, Happy/cheery, Protective, Stable, Confident, Responsible, Sweet, loving, Loves to work, Easy going, laid back

 • I DO NOT want a dog that is (mark all that apply): • I DO NOT want a dog that is (mark all that apply): Serious, no-nonsense, Independent, Stubborn, Distant and cat-like, Fearful, Submissive, Excitable and bouncy, Jealous of me, Playful Assertive and pushy, Happy-go-lucky, Goofy, Dependent and needy, Calm, Slow • I WANT a dog that requires: A lot of exercise so I will be outside often, A short walk or two, lots of play time, A moderate amount of exercise and playtime

 • I WANT a dog that has these traits: • Comfortable with all • I WANT a dog that has these traits: • Comfortable with all sorts of people, Doesn’t startle easily, Gets along with cats and small animals, Recovers quickly from a startle, Likes dogs but prefers people, Looks at me a lot, Is not afraid of thunder, Does not approach the fence stiffly, Does not drop its head and stare at another dog , Does not bark incessantly, Is NOT protective of food or toys, Does NOT ‘stand tall’ around dogs, Is NOT stiff when handled(be careful, stiffness is indication of possible bite), Is not constantly climbing of top of me, Gives me the ball, lets me win at tug

Program Dogs • Either puppy raisers or raised at facility • Puppy raisers can Program Dogs • Either puppy raisers or raised at facility • Puppy raisers can be private homes, jails, colleges. Some have high school students raise and train dogs • Some facilities start training tasks to ‘baby’ puppies • Some have breeding programs, some take donations, some use shelter dogs

Programs, con’t • Some retain ownership of the dog and will remove the dog Programs, con’t • Some retain ownership of the dog and will remove the dog if directions aren’t followed: if the dog is overweight, skills aren’t practiced, another trainer used, the dog isn’t utilized as trained • Some will offer to take retired dogs and find retirement homes • May not allow other pets in home • Some programs(and breeders) require certain food be fed and limited and/or specific treats

Programs, Questions to ask • What is their success rate and does that include Programs, Questions to ask • What is their success rate and does that include career-change dogs? • How long is the wait and how do they determine priority • What is their entire procedure, from application to delivery • How long is the turn-over and what kind of follow-up do they provide • Do they give priority to previous clients

Programs, cont’d If the program asks clients to fund-raise: • when does the program Programs, cont’d If the program asks clients to fund-raise: • when does the program begin looking for a dog • What happens to the money if the dog selected doesn’t work out at some point • Is there someone to help with fund-raising at the program • If you can’t raise all the money, what happens • If you can’t fundraise, can you still get a dog and how long is the wait

 • • • Program Questionnaire Example Applicant Diagnosis/Disability How does this affect you • • • Program Questionnaire Example Applicant Diagnosis/Disability How does this affect you and your daily life? How do you think a Service Dog might help you mitigate your disability? Specific Tasks you would like a SD to perform (such as pick up things, get the phone, pull a chair) References from doctor and/or care team, social worker, friends, etc

 • The care and maintenance of a SD is very important. Your dog • The care and maintenance of a SD is very important. Your dog should be clean and groomed, no dirt, loose hair, or foul odor, flea and worm free, have trimmed nails and clean ears, and not have highly offensive breath to be healthy and comfortable and able to work long hours, and to be a well-received assistant. The equipment you use should be well-maintained, clean, odor-free. • I can provide for my dog’s care and maintenance myself __Yes __No • I have a very supportive family or friends who can help me with my dog’s daily needs __Yes __No • If NO, how do you plan to provide for your dogs daily needs?

 • A SD’s health is very important and can cost $2, 000 or • A SD’s health is very important and can cost $2, 000 or more per year food, routine medical needs, and grooming. It can cost even more if you need to hire a dog-walker or need to pay for boarding should you need to be hospitalized. • I currently have the means to support and maintain my Service Dog. ___Yes ___No • If NO, how do you plan on providing for your dog’s health and well-being?

 • A SD works hard and needs to relax and play, run and • A SD works hard and needs to relax and play, run and stretch and get some good exercise in order to maintain a healthy mind and body. This DOES NOT include going to dog parks!!! • How do you plan to provide this for your Service Dog?

 • It can take up to a year for you and your SD • It can take up to a year for you and your SD to become a good working team. You will need to practice tasks and obedience frequently, and to travel to various locations specifically to practice. If you do not practice daily for the first month and several times/week for the next 5 -11 months, you run the chance your dog may forget tasks! • I have the time, ability and dedication to practice with my Service Dog. ___Yes ___No • If NO, how do you plan on providing training in obedience and practicing tasks?

 • Working with a SD in public can be a difficult, frustrating experience • Working with a SD in public can be a difficult, frustrating experience at times. A simple trip to buy soap can take much longer than it does now, simply because people want to talk to you about your dog, tell you how wonderful it is, how they had a second cousin that had a SD 20 years ago, or even pet your dog after you have told them not to. ‘Gatekeepers’ can be aggravating and daunting, even when your dog is ‘dressed’. You will need to maintain your composure when dealing with frustrating events, and to act as your dog’s calm, assertive leader in these circumstances.

 • I believe I have the patience and ability to maintain composure in • I believe I have the patience and ability to maintain composure in difficult circumstances. I know my SD and I are ambassadors, whether I want to be or not. I believe I will be able to provide for my dog’s mental and social well-being in times of stress in public settings. ___Yes ___No • If NO, what would you need to do to reach this state of competency?

Let’s Hit The Road! • Your SD will need to be comfortable in all Let’s Hit The Road! • Your SD will need to be comfortable in all situations, you never know what you’ll meet! • Start puppies as soon as you can, carrying them until they are housetrained, and only short trips until they are solid in potty habits

Training, cont’d • Keep all interactions with other people and animals gentle, fun, and Training, cont’d • Keep all interactions with other people and animals gentle, fun, and not overwhelming • Make it a point to find novel people and situations • Mardi Gras is NOT for the faint of heart! • Be careful where you take your young dogs!!!

 • • Training, cont’d When your youngster is finally able to go into • • Training, cont’d When your youngster is finally able to go into stores, plan separate trips for training and shopping! If you push your young dog too hard, you run the risk of burn out or shutdown, it isn’t fair to the dog! Program dogs may not be allowed out in public until trainer approves you as working team If you get into a sticky situation, exit cheerfully and keep your dog happy to be out and about BEWARE OF ASKING FOR JUST ONE MORE TASK REPETITION!

Training, cont’d • Ben trains for flying! This is his ‘squish’ command, letting him Training, cont’d • Ben trains for flying! This is his ‘squish’ command, letting him know he will have to fit into an exceedingly small space • Some dogs are taught to back into tight spaces • You will need to words that you can remember

Training, cont’d Things to consider: • Do you want your dog to visit with Training, cont’d Things to consider: • Do you want your dog to visit with people, brief sniff or to be petted • Do you want to tell others your dog’s real name or use a public name that has no meaning to the dog • Your dog should be trained to ignore petting when not told to visit • Pick words that are acceptable in public! • Some tasks may be incompatible with dog’s age, ie, teaching a youngster to open the fridge and get an item…might lead to stealing food!

Pack Items Pick-up bags • Cleaning wipes For dog For floor • Paper towels Pack Items Pick-up bags • Cleaning wipes For dog For floor • Paper towels • Water bowl • Treats • Mat or light towel if going to dirty location, ie, movie theater • Documentation Doc’s orders Dog’s health info State and Fed laws • Plastic grocery bags Easily accessible!

Some Supplies for Daily Use • • Pack or harness: What do YOU need Some Supplies for Daily Use • • Pack or harness: What do YOU need What does DOG need Bandana, vest, harness or backpack • Solid handle, stretchy strap, long bridge • Leash: • Length, thickness, adjustable (not retractable!) • Mat – thickness, flexibility, washable • I-bolts for tethering at home and work • Crate • Car seat cover, grating • Grooming equipment, even if you take dog to groomer • Log book for training

Training Log • This is very important, it might be needed should you go Training Log • This is very important, it might be needed should you go to court in an access case or seek certification from a program • Should include: date, time, target behavior, location of training, success rate • For alerting dogs – scent level, such as blood glucose level of sample • Some are laid out one page for one task, others are a daily log, may be journal style or technical

Training Log, cont’d • Hand target 5/29 - 10: 00 – 10: 05 in Training Log, cont’d • Hand target 5/29 - 10: 00 – 10: 05 in house (you would check successful repetitions) OR 5/29 10 -10: 05 in the house we practiced Hand Targeting and dog was successful most of the time The casual journal format can be less clear on how your dog is progressing, unless checkboxes are used like the first example. It isn’t clear when you should move to the next step, which is usually at 90% success rate

Questions? ? ? Questions? ? ?