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To Kill a Mockingbird By Harper Lee To Kill a Mockingbird By Harper Lee

SETTING OF THE NOVEL FSouthern United States F 1930’s FGreat Depression FPrejudice and legal SETTING OF THE NOVEL FSouthern United States F 1930’s FGreat Depression FPrejudice and legal segregation FIgnorance

1930’s - Great Depression began when the stock market crashed in October, 1929 F 1930’s - Great Depression began when the stock market crashed in October, 1929 F Businesses failed, factories closed F People were out of work F Even people with money suffered because nothing was being produced for sale. F Poor people lost their homes, were forced to “live off the land. ”

Racial prejudice was alive & well. Although slavery had ended in 1864, old ideas Racial prejudice was alive & well. Although slavery had ended in 1864, old ideas were slow to change.

Racial Separation (segregation) Racial Separation (segregation)

Gender Bias (Prejudice) FWomen were considered “weak” FWomen were generally not educated for occupations Gender Bias (Prejudice) FWomen were considered “weak” FWomen were generally not educated for occupations outside the home FIn wealthy families, women were expected to oversee the servants and entertain guests FMen not considered capable of nurturing children

“White trash” FPoor, uneducated white people who lived on “relief “ F lowest social “White trash” FPoor, uneducated white people who lived on “relief “ F lowest social class, even below the poor blacks F prejudiced against black people Ffelt the need to “put down” blacks in order to elevate themselves

Legal Issues of the 1930’s which impact the story F Women given the vote Legal Issues of the 1930’s which impact the story F Women given the vote in 1920 F Juries were MALE and WHITE F “Fair trial” did not include acceptance of a black man’s word against a white man’s

Prejudice in the novel Race Gender Handicaps Rich/Poor Age Religion Prejudice in the novel Race Gender Handicaps Rich/Poor Age Religion

Characters FAtticus Finch - an attorney whose wife has died, leaving him to raise Characters FAtticus Finch - an attorney whose wife has died, leaving him to raise their two children: -Jem – 10 -year-old boy -Scout – (Jean Louise), 6 -year-old girl FTom Robinson – a black man accused of raping white girl; he is defended at trial by Atticus

Point of View FFirst person FStory is told by Scout, a 10 -year -old Point of View FFirst person FStory is told by Scout, a 10 -year -old girl FHarper Lee is actually a woman; Scout represents the author as a little girl although the story is not strictly autobiographical

Reading the Novel FSetting is all important –be aware of the “where” and “when” Reading the Novel FSetting is all important –be aware of the “where” and “when” as you begin FPoint of View – the novel is shaped by the voice of a young girl who sees the story from a position of naïve acceptance F“Goodness vs. Ignorance (Evil)” is an important theme

Chapters 4 -6 F 1. Name two different items the children find in the Chapters 4 -6 F 1. Name two different items the children find in the tree. F 2. What new game do the children play for most of the summer? F 3. What is Atticus’s reaction to the game? F 4. What secret does Scout have about her “tire ride” into the Radley yard? F 5. What is the children’s plan to get a note to Boo? F 6. What will the note say? F 7. Whose shadow do the children see on the porch? F 8. Why does Jem return to the Radley

Vocabulary List #2 Chapters 8 -12 F 1. intimidate F 2. auspicious F 3. Vocabulary List #2 Chapters 8 -12 F 1. intimidate F 2. auspicious F 3. peril (2) F 4. libel F 5. rabies F 6. wrath F 7. compassion F 8. altercation F 9. browbeat F 10. ambidextrous F 11. F 13. F 14. (2) F 15. (2) F 16. F 17. F 18. F 19. F 20. expunge corroborative circumstantial unmitigated temerity predilection amble cynic pauper

Comprehension Quiz Chap. 12 -16 F 1. At Calpurnia’s church, for whom is a Comprehension Quiz Chap. 12 -16 F 1. At Calpurnia’s church, for whom is a collection taken? F 2. Who was waiting for the children when they arrived home from church? F 3. Why did Dill run away? F 4. Why does the group of men come to the Finches’ front door? F 5. What does Mr. Underwood do for a living? F 6. Where do the men say that Heck Tate and his men are? F 7. Whom does Scout recognize in the crowd of men at the jail? F 8. In effect, how does Scout manage to disperse the men? F 9. Who had the gang covered with a gun? F 10. Where do the children sit in the courthouse?

“Mother To Son” -Langston Hughes Well, son, I'll tell you: Life for me ain't “Mother To Son” -Langston Hughes Well, son, I'll tell you: Life for me ain't been no crystal stair. It's had tacks in it, And splinters, And boards torn up, And places with no carpet on the floor --Bare. But all the time I'se been a-climbin' on, And reachin' landin's, And turnin' corners, And sometimes goin' in the dark Where there ain't been no light. So boy, don't you turn back. Don't you set down on the steps 'Cause you finds it's kinder hard. Don't you fall now -For I'se still goin', honey, I'se still climbin', And life for me ain't been no crystal stair.

“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” Free bird leaps -Maya on the back “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” Free bird leaps -Maya on the back of the win and floats downstream till the current ends and dips his wings in the orange sun rays and dares to claim the sky. Angelou The free bird thinks of another breeze an the trade winds soft through the sighing trees and the fat worms waiting on a dawn-bright lawn and he names the sky his own. But a bird that stalks down his narrow cage can seldom see through his bars of rage his wings are clipped and his feet are tied so he opens his throat to sing. But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream his wings are clipped and his feet are tied so he opens his throat to sing The caged bird sings with fearful trill of the things unknown but longed for still and is tune is heard on the distant hillfor the caged bird sings of freedom The caged bird sings with a fearful trill of things unknown but longed for still and his tune is heard on the distant hill for the caged bird sings of freedom.

Directions: Interpretation and Reflection - Beside each stanza interpret the meaning that you find Directions: Interpretation and Reflection - Beside each stanza interpret the meaning that you find within each. Look deep! Answer the following questions in complete sentences: 1. Explain the surroundings of the bird in the poem. 2. What does the bird look like. 3. Who/What could the image of the caged bird represent and why? 4. Themes represented in the poem? 5. Your opinion of the poem.

TKM List #2 Test 1. _____false publication 2. _____anger, rage, violence 3. _____to remove, TKM List #2 Test 1. _____false publication 2. _____anger, rage, violence 3. _____to remove, erase completely 4. _____absolute, downright 5. _____ a noisy quarrel 6. _____ a very poor person 7. _____ something that may cause harm or danger 8. _____ rash, daring, bold 9. _____ not of primary importance 10. _____ to intimidate or bully A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. auspicious libel peril rabies wrath altercation browbeat expunge circumstantial unmitigated temerity corroborative prejudice subsequent

Based on your knowledge of the definitions of the following words, tell whether each Based on your knowledge of the definitions of the following words, tell whether each is used correctly. (Yes/No) F 11. Can a person amble? F 12. Is a cynic a good friend to have? F 13. Would you like to feel condescension? F 14. Can a tree be ambidextrous? F 15. You have a predilection for flavors of ice cream. F 16. Buying a pack of gum would be a phenomenal event in one’s life!!

Please use each of the following words in a sentence that clearly F 17. Please use each of the following words in a sentence that clearly F 17. shows its meaning… prejudice F 18. F 19. F 20. F 21. F 22. F 23. F 24. F 25. rabies corroborative concessions browbeat indigenous compassion peril auspicious

Reading Schedule FMonday: CW: Ch. 1 HW: Finish FTuesday: CW: Ch. 2 HW: Ch. Reading Schedule FMonday: CW: Ch. 1 HW: Finish FTuesday: CW: Ch. 2 HW: Ch. 3 FWednesday: CW: Ch. 4& 5 HW: Ch. 6 FThursday: CW: Ch. 7 & 8 FFriday: Finish for Monday

Vocabulary List #3 Chapters 19 -31 F 1. rouse (1) F 2. credible F Vocabulary List #3 Chapters 19 -31 F 1. rouse (1) F 2. credible F 3. capital (1) F 4. misdemeanor F 5. vehement F 6. acquittal F 7. hung jury F 8. hypocrite F 9. due process (3) F 10. queasy F 11. demise (3) F 12. recluse (2) F 13. notorious F 14. tact F 15. judicious F+ All words from last week. (40 words total!)

Reading Guide CH 16 -18 FAtticus spends a great deal of time discussing Mayella’s Reading Guide CH 16 -18 FAtticus spends a great deal of time discussing Mayella’s injuries. What does he want to reveal? FDescribe the Ewell home and their home-life. FWhat is so important about Tom’s physical appearance? Why is this important?

Chapters 19 -21 F 1. According to Tom, when did Mayella ask Tom to Chapters 19 -21 F 1. According to Tom, when did Mayella ask Tom to chop-up the chiffarobe? F 2. According to Tom, for what purpose did Mayella invite Tom into her house? F 3. According to Tom, where were all the Ewell children? F 4. According to Tom, why did he run from the Ewell house? F 5. According to Tom, is he strong enough to choke a women and throw her to the ground? F 6. What one mistake does Tom make on the witness stand?

Essay: FRespond to the following quote: “Atticus was right. One time he said you Essay: FRespond to the following quote: “Atticus was right. One time he said you never really know a man until you stand in his shoes and walk around in them. ” Meaning? Significance? FWhat is the connection between the title of the book and themes expressed throughout the novel?