Скачать презентацию The Mankind Initiative Public Sector Equality Duty and Скачать презентацию The Mankind Initiative Public Sector Equality Duty and

e1b7bdc4eacceb7340d3416df7cebdb0.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 16

The Mankind Initiative Public Sector Equality Duty and Communications The Mankind Initiative Public Sector Equality Duty and Communications

Public sector equality duty made up of a general equality duty which applies to Public sector equality duty made up of a general equality duty which applies to public authorities – gender equality duty subsumed Came into force 5 April 2011 as part of Equality Act 2010 Due regard to: advance equality of opportunity for those with protected characteristics (gender) Thereby: remove or minimise disadvantages suffered people by protected characteristic meet needs of those if different from needs of other people

Do you comply? Responsibility to ensure there are sufficient domestic abuse/violence services to • Do you comply? Responsibility to ensure there are sufficient domestic abuse/violence services to • meet the needs of male victims (and their children) • meet needs of female victims (and their children) Place yourself in the shoes of a male and a female victim – what journey would you take?

Five step checklist - Knowledge What do you know about male and female victims Five step checklist - Knowledge What do you know about male and female victims in your community? • • • Local police figures (c 20%: 80%) British Crime Survey (c 33%: 66%) Accident and Emergency GP’s Solicitors Housing Departments CAB Homeless charities/Salvation Army Women’s Aid/Refuge/third sector

Five step checklist – Service map What services are available for female and male Five step checklist – Service map What services are available for female and male victims in community? • • • emergency housing support (refuge/safe house) charities men’s groups specialist solicitors IDVAs Map any gaps

Five step checklist – Policy making and policy delivery Are male victims integral part Five step checklist – Policy making and policy delivery Are male victims integral part of policy and decision-making process, and are they integral to the application of policy on the ground? • • • Domestic violence strategy Community safety Emergency housing provision Domestic abuse forums (does anyone represent men? ) Gender equality duty compliance report “Oh by the way, some men can also be victims” does not constitute compliance.

Five step checklist - Training Are all those that come into contact with domestic Five step checklist - Training Are all those that come into contact with domestic abuse victims trained to recognise, believe and support male and female victims? • • • housing officers community safety officers police officers GP’s nurses solicitors

Five step checklist - Awareness How will you make • • • men employers Five step checklist - Awareness How will you make • • • men employers friends society, and, service providers aware men are victims too?

The journey for men and women Have you built a route to freedom for The journey for men and women Have you built a route to freedom for male victims and have you provided the means to get there? • • • Have you got the knowledge? Have you got the services? Are male services included in policy creation and delivery Are your staff trained? Are men aware of the help you have to offer? Statutory duty to ensure men (and their children) receive the support they need. Can be different support but must have the same choices and opportunities for freedom as women do.

Communicating to male victims • Men do not recognise they are a victim • Communicating to male victims • Men do not recognise they are a victim • Society does not recognise men are victims too • Public authorities do not do enough to ask/encourage men – do they ask?

Men staying quiet Victims of partner abuse (2010/11) – British Crime Survey One in Men staying quiet Victims of partner abuse (2010/11) – British Crime Survey One in four calls to helpline are not from the male victims themselves

Additional male barriers Additional barriers why men will not tell the authorities: • • Additional male barriers Additional barriers why men will not tell the authorities: • • • Concern about whethere is help Lack of recognition / less of a man Concern about whether will be believed Concern about children Lack of encouragement

Campaigns – Five principles Why: so men know men are victims, they will be Campaigns – Five principles Why: so men know men are victims, they will be believed and there is help out there. What: separate/reciprocal campaigns or same campaigns but must spell out ‘male and female. Gender neutral ‘all victims’ campaigns men just assume are for women – must say ‘man’ in any campaigns

Campaigns – Five principles How: posters, leaflets, websites, adverts, announcements, leadership speeches, survivor case Campaigns – Five principles How: posters, leaflets, websites, adverts, announcements, leadership speeches, survivor case studies, men that men can relate to (sport) Where: where men go/where a man would not be with partner - websites, pubs, employers, garages, service stations, business pages, sports pages/clubs, football programmes etc

Campaigns – Five principles When: where a man would not be with a partner Campaigns – Five principles When: where a man would not be with a partner - weekday not school term or weekend. Tie into national domestic violence week, sports events or International Men’s Day (19 Nov)

Summary • Public sector equality duty applies to both female and male victims • Summary • Public sector equality duty applies to both female and male victims • Place yourself in the shoes of a female and male victim within your community and/or service users • Ensure men and society recognise men are victims too