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Teacher Quality & Title I Paraprofessional Qualifications © 2006 Texas Education Agency 1 Teacher Quality & Title I Paraprofessional Qualifications © 2006 Texas Education Agency 1

Highly Qualified Teachers Title I, Part A Section 1119 2 Highly Qualified Teachers Title I, Part A Section 1119 2

The History 3 The History 3

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher A Nation at Risk: Released in HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher A Nation at Risk: Released in 1983. Propelled the “world of education” into a tail-spin; it described the inadequacies that permeated through America’s educational system. Ten years later, the crisis continued due to the lack of rigor, standards, and funding at the local, state, and national levels. High expectations for high-poverty schools was virtually nonexistent locally and nationally, there was little consensus as to the approach for resolving the issue. 4

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Redefining Education: 1993 government sought to HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Redefining Education: 1993 government sought to eliminate Department of Education. Remarkably, by the year 2000, education moved to the forefront of the nation’s domestic agenda. The national consensus formed around the need to raise standards for all children. 5

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Improving Education: Opened dialogue. Targeted and HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Improving Education: Opened dialogue. Targeted and restructured increased accountability. Closed the achievement gap. Established clear national education goals. Increased funding. 6

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Improvement of Teaching: The federal government HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Improvement of Teaching: The federal government made the first major investment to improve teacher education in almost 30 years. School districts were challenged to stop two practices: 1) assigning people to teach outside their degreed field 2) assigning new teachers to the most challenging classes (“sink or swim” approach) These practices lead to burnout and the departure of more than 20% of all new teachers. 7

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Federal support: National Board of Professional HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Federal support: National Board of Professional Teaching Standards was created. Encouraged the upgrading of professional development programs. In three years under the new program, Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology, more than 400, 000 of our nation’s new teachers were trained to integrate technology into the curriculum. 8

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Colleges and universities allowed their schools HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Colleges and universities allowed their schools of education to become marginalized. College presidents were urged to make teacher preparation central to the mission of higher education. Performance-based certification began whereby a potential teacher demonstrated the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective in the classroom. 9

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “We need a dramatic overhaul of HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “We need a dramatic overhaul of how we recruit, prepare, license, induct, and retain good teachers. We will get the high-quality teachers that our children deserve only when we prepare them well, pay them well, and create conditions in which teachers are treated as professionals whose learning and growth are valued and supported. ” Richard W. Riley Former Secretary of Education 10

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “At a time when millions of HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “At a time when millions of students are going to need extra help to meet challenging new standards, we no longer can assume that we can get good teachers on the cheap and expect them to work only nine months a year. I believe it is a wise move for the future of American education to make teaching a better-paid, year-round profession. ” Richard W. Riley Former Secretary of Education 11

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Capacity Building: Dollars had to be HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher Capacity Building: Dollars had to be infused into the educational system to support high-quality, sustained professional development for teachers and principals. There was a need for schools to have the necessary tools to use test data effectively so to help students succeed more effectively, i. e. : online diagnostic testing training and tools for data analysis timely test results extra time and extra help for those who need it 12

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher A workable accountability system linked to HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher A workable accountability system linked to standards began in 1994 with the reauthorization of a new and improved ESEA. In 1998 there was strong bipartisan support in Congress for a comprehensive school reform initiative. In 1999 the $134 million Education Accountability Fund was created. Resources were targeted to the poorest schools and promoted the idea of whole-school reform. Title I required states to set a single high standard for all children and to test students at three key grades to gauge progress. 13

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher 2001 ESEA required: New annual tests HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher 2001 ESEA required: New annual tests for grades 3 -8 Timelines for improvement Equity and Excellence issues began to arise regarding achievement gaps between: African Americans Hispanic Americans Other minority groups Children with disabilities Therefore, NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND was born. 14

HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “…the movement to raise achievement levels HOW IT ALL BEGAN: The Highly Qualified Teacher “…the movement to raise achievement levels cannot be driven by standardization. Creativity in teaching and learning must be encouraged, not stymied. If we create an accountability system that is more punitive than diagnostic, more about fear than achieving success, then we will have missed the mark entirely about how to raise standards. ” Richard W. Riley Former Secretary of Education 15

Certified Does Not Mean Highly Qualified 16 Certified Does Not Mean Highly Qualified 16

When? End of SY 2005 -2006: All teachers in core academic subject areas Two When? End of SY 2005 -2006: All teachers in core academic subject areas Two exceptions for certain new teachers: Rural Flexibility Special Education Flexibility 17

Who? When Hired—Title I, Part A Teachers Schoolwide Campus: All teachers in core academic Who? When Hired—Title I, Part A Teachers Schoolwide Campus: All teachers in core academic subject areas Targeted Assistance Campus: All teachers whose salary is paid in whole or in part with Title I, Part A funds 18

NCLB Highly Qualified vs. State Certification Structure The NCLB definition of “highly qualified” does NCLB Highly Qualified vs. State Certification Structure The NCLB definition of “highly qualified” does not completely align to the current state certification structure and assignment rules. Teachers who are allowed to teach certain courses under state certification and assignment rules may not meet the definition of “highly qualified. ” Teachers who do meet the definition of “highly qualified” may require a permit under the current state certification structure. 19

Highly Qualified Core Academic Subject Areas English Reading/Language Arts Mathematics Science Foreign Languages Civics Highly Qualified Core Academic Subject Areas English Reading/Language Arts Mathematics Science Foreign Languages Civics and Government Economics History Geography Arts (Music, Art, Dance, and Theatre) 20

Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, and 21

Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, and A person who holds a valid Texas standard teacher’s certificate or lifetime teacher’s certificate has full state certification. 22

Highly Qualified A person who holds a valid Texas standard teacher’s certificate or A Highly Qualified A person who holds a valid Texas standard teacher’s certificate or A teacher meets NCLB definition if the lifetime teacher’s certificate has full teacher has— state certification. Full State Certification, and Also, a degreed individual who holds a probationary certificate, has demonstrated content mastery, and is participating in an acceptable alternate route to certification program may be considered “fully certified” under the “highly qualified” requirements. 23

Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, and Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and 24

Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, Highly Qualified A teacher meets NCLB definition if the teacher has— Full State Certification, and Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and Demonstrated Competency 25

Highly Qualified New Elementary Teacher— A teacher meets NCLB definition if the Passing the Highly Qualified New Elementary Teacher— A teacher meets NCLB definition if the Passing the teacher has— Elementary Comprehensive Full Examination for Certification of Educators in Texas (Ex. CET) or the grade-level appropriate State Certification, Educator Standards and Texas Examination of (TEx. ES). Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and Demonstrated Competency 26

Highly Qualified Existing Elementary Teacher— A teacher meets NCLB definition if the • Passing Highly Qualified Existing Elementary Teacher— A teacher meets NCLB definition if the • Passing either teacher has— the Ex. CET or TEx. ES, or Full • Meeting the requirements established under the Certification, and State High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation for elementary teachers. Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and Demonstrated Competency 27

Highly Qualified New Secondary Teacher— • Passing the applicable Ex. CET/TEx. ES content exam Highly Qualified New Secondary Teacher— • Passing the applicable Ex. CET/TEx. ES content exam for a certification area appropriate to the teaching assignment, or A teacher meets NCLB definition if the • Having an academic major or graduate degree teacher the coursework equivalent to an or has— undergraduate academic major in the core Full State Certification, and academic subject area(s) taught [i. e. , 24 semester hours, with 12 of the hours being upper-division (junior- or senior-level) courses in the core academic subject area]. Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and Demonstrated Competency 28

Highly Qualified Existing Secondary Teacher— • Passing the applicable Ex. CET/TEx. ES, or • Highly Qualified Existing Secondary Teacher— • Passing the applicable Ex. CET/TEx. ES, or • Having an academic major or graduate the A teacher meets NCLB definition if degree or the coursework equivalent to an teacher has— academic major in the core undergraduate academic subject area taught, or Full • Meeting the requirements established under State Certification, and the High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Bachelor’s Degree (or higher), and Evaluation for secondary teachers. Demonstrated Competency 29

Implementation The LEA should always place the best-qualified teacher available in the classroom. In Implementation The LEA should always place the best-qualified teacher available in the classroom. In addition, each LEA and campus must have a recruitment and retention plan that demonstrates that the LEA has strategies and a timeline for attracting and retaining “highly qualified” staff, with the ultimate goal being that all teachers in the core academic subjects will be “highly qualified” by the end of the 2005 -2006 school year. 30

Implementation LEAs are advised to make adjustments to teacher assignments and hiring procedures that Implementation LEAs are advised to make adjustments to teacher assignments and hiring procedures that are prudent and manageable in order to come into compliance. LEA’s are required to keep accurate documentation of teacher assignments and credentials. The burden of proof rests on the district in determining a teacher’s highly qualified status. 31

In general, permits, waivers, and other temporary credentials do not meet the federal intent In general, permits, waivers, and other temporary credentials do not meet the federal intent of highly qualified; however, there are exceptions. TEA continues to work with USDE to determine flexibility in this area. 32

Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Teaching waiver approved Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Teaching waiver approved by the Commissioner of Education. School District Teaching Permit approved by the Commissioner of Education. 33

Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Emergency permits issued Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Emergency permits issued by SBEC to uncertified individuals (subject, grade-level, or both) for assignments in the core academic subject areas. Exception: It is possible for an elementary teacher to meet the requirements of a “highly qualified” secondary teacher if the teacher has full state elementary certification and the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper-division) for demonstrating competency in the subject area being taught at the secondary level. 34

Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Temporary Classroom Assignment Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” Temporary Classroom Assignment Permit (TCAP) issued by the school district under SBEC rules to teach academic class periods outside of the subject area of certification in grades 6 -12 for one year. Exception: It is possible for a teacher under this permit to meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if the teacher has full state certification and the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper-division) for demonstrating competency in the subject area being taught that is outside their area of certification at the middle school or high school levels, as appropriate. 35

Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” A nonrenewable permit Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” A nonrenewable permit (NRP) issued to a teacher who holds a lifetime certification that is no longer valid in order to allow time to reactivate certification by passing a state-approved examination. Exception: It is possible for a teacher under this permit to meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if the teacher has the required coursework (24 semester hours, 12 of which are upper division) for demonstrating competency at the middle school or high school levels, as appropriate. 36

Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” A nonrenewable permit Permits, Temporary Credentials, & Waivers NOT in Compliance with “Highly Qualified” A nonrenewable permit (NRP) issued to a first-year teacher who has a baccalaureate degree and has completed all courses required for certification, including student teaching, but has not completed all certification exams. 37

Alternative Certification Programs Teachers in ACP programs may be considered to be highly qualified Alternative Certification Programs Teachers in ACP programs may be considered to be highly qualified during the internship year if they meet the following requirements. Participate in an SBEC-approved alternative route to certification program under which they: 1) receive high-quality professional development that is sustained, intensive, and classroom-focused 2) participate in a program of intensive supervision or structured mentoring 3) assume functions as a teacher not to exceed 3 years 4) demonstrate satisfactory progress toward full certification 38

Alternative Certification – cont. Hold a minimum of a bachelor’s degree Demonstrate subject matter Alternative Certification – cont. Hold a minimum of a bachelor’s degree Demonstrate subject matter competency in each of the academic subjects assigned to teach: 1) for new elementary ACP interns – pass a rigorous State test of subject knowledge and teaching skills in reading, writing, math, and other areas of basic elementary curriculum (TEx. ES). 2) for new secondary ACP interns – pass the appropriate TEx. ES exam or have an academic major or graduate degree or the coursework equivalent in the core academic subject areas they 39 teach.

Elementary Highly Qualified 40 Elementary Highly Qualified 40

NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Core Academic Subject All core academic subject Title I, Part NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Core Academic Subject All core academic subject Title I, Part A teachers must be HQ by Areas) end of SY 2005 -2006. must be HQ when hired. Bachelor’s Degree Full State Certification Demonstrates Subject Competency Elementary Secondary 41

Elementary (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Existing Pass Ex. CET, TEx. ES* Pass Ex. CET Elementary (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Existing Pass Ex. CET, TEx. ES* Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES* OR * or accepted comparable exam Meet High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation 42

High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation The state has the authority to develop High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation The state has the authority to develop a High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation for existing elementary and secondary teachers. HOUSE is defined in the NCLB Guidance Document. 43

HOUSE A for Elementary Competency is demonstrated by meeting all three of the following HOUSE A for Elementary Competency is demonstrated by meeting all three of the following criteria: 1. At least one creditable year of teaching experience. AND 2. A minimum of 24 points derived from— Experience teaching at the elementary level [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ]; and/or College coursework in English/Language Arts, Math, Science, and/or Social Studies* [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or Professional development that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ]. 44

HOUSE A for Elementary (cont’d) AND 3. Each of the subjects (English/Language Arts, Mathematics, HOUSE A for Elementary (cont’d) AND 3. Each of the subjects (English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies*) is represented in the 24 points, whether through experience, college coursework, or professional development. [*Note: The social studies requirement may be met through coursework or CPE hours in government, history, economics, geography, or political science. ] 45

Professional Development CPE Institutes, workshops, seminars, conferences, in-service or staff development; Interactive distance learning, Professional Development CPE Institutes, workshops, seminars, conferences, in-service or staff development; Interactive distance learning, video conferencing, or online activities or conferences; Independent study (20% max), which may include authoring a published work; Development of curriculum or CPE training materials; Teaching or presenting a CPE activity, (10% max); Serving as a mentor educator, (30% max); and Serving as an assessor under TAC § 241. 35 relating to the Principal Certificate (10% max). 46

Elementary HOUSE A Activity Scenario 1 47 Elementary HOUSE A Activity Scenario 1 47

Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Jan is a certified elementary teacher who holds Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Jan is a certified elementary teacher who holds a bachelor’s degree. She taught 16 years in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, teaching all four subjects 10 of those years. She began in 1974 and became a consultant in 1990. She has now returned to teach fifth grade in your district. She has not taken any Ex. CET or TEx. ES exams. You are able to document college coursework in Physics (6 hrs. ) and English (9 hrs. ). 48

Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 1 Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 1 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Jan is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 49

Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Jan is a certified elementary teacher who holds Scenario 1: Is Jan Highly Qualified? Jan is a certified elementary teacher who holds a bachelor’s degree. She taught 16 years in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, teaching all four subjects 10 of those years. She began in 1974 and became a consultant in 1990. She has now returned to teach fifth grade in your district. She has not taken any Ex. CET or TEx. ES exams. You are able to document college coursework in Physics (6 hrs. ) and English (9 hrs. ). Bachelors? Y Certified? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES? N Elementary HOUSE A: One Year of Experience? Y Experience: 16 yrs el. : 12 yrs max Courses: English: 9 hrs Physics 6 hrs Total: 15 hrs (other course hrs not needed) Total: 27 pts Points in all 4 subject areas –Through experience Highly Qualified? YES 50

Scenario 1: Notes on Jan Because Jan came into teaching prior to the Ex. Scenario 1: Notes on Jan Because Jan came into teaching prior to the Ex. CET test, she had to demonstrate HQ through HOUSE A must be used since Jan teaches all subjects. Jan demonstrated points in all four subject areas through her prior experience. This could also be shown through coursework, or a combination of the two. 51

HOUSE B for Elementary Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria: HOUSE B for Elementary Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria: The teacher has at least one creditable year of teaching experience. AND 2. The teacher has college coursework equivalent to a college major in the subject to be taught. 1. Intended for departmentalized elementary classes, music, or art. 52

Elementary HOUSE B Activity Scenario 2 53 Elementary HOUSE B Activity Scenario 2 53

Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Mark holds a bachelor’s degree, has secondary math Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Mark holds a bachelor’s degree, has secondary math certification, and has taught 7 th and 8 th grade math at your Junior High for 5 years. Mark has taken the secondary math Ex. CET, and has 24 hours of college hours in math (12 hours are from freshman and sophomore courses, and 12 hours are from junior and senior courses). You have already determined that he is HQ for his junior high math courses; however, your campus has recently become a middle school, adding 6 th grade math to his teaching load. Can Mark be considered highly qualified to teach 6 th grade math, even though he has not taken an 54 Ex. CET or TEx. ES in elementary?

Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 2 Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 2 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Mark is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 55

Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Mark holds a bachelor’s degree, has secondary math Scenario 2: Is Mark Highly Qualified? Mark holds a bachelor’s degree, has secondary math certification, and has taught 7 th and 8 th grade math at your Junior High for 5 years. Mark has taken the secondary math Ex. CET, and has 24 hours of college hours in math (12 hours are from freshman and sophomore courses, and 12 hours are from junior and senior courses) Your campus has recently become a middle school, adding 6 th grade math to his teaching load. Can Mark be considered highly qualified to teach 6 th grade math, even though he has not taken an Ex. CET or TEx. ES in elementary? Bachelors? Y Certified? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES? N (Not in elementary) Elementary HOUSE B: One year of experience? Y Courses: 24 hours of math (12 hours are from freshman/sophomore courses, and 12 hours are from junior/senior courses) Is Mark Highly Qualified? YES 56

Scenario 2: Notes on Mark 6 th grade is considered elementary, thus middle school Scenario 2: Notes on Mark 6 th grade is considered elementary, thus middle school teachers teaching both 6 th and 7 th or 8 th must demonstrate HQ status for elementary and secondary. Mark’s 12 upper level coursework would generally be considered 3000/4000 level courses, or higher. 57

Secondary Highly Qualified 58 Secondary Highly Qualified 58

NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Core Academic Subject All core academic subject Title I, Part NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Core Academic Subject All core academic subject Title I, Part A teachers Areas) teachers must be HQ by end of SY 2005 -2006. must be HQ when hired. Bachelor’s Degree Full State Certification Demonstrates Subject Competency Elementary Secondary 59

Secondary (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES* (In Subject Taught) Secondary (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES* (In Subject Taught) OR Existing Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES* (In Subject Taught) OR FOR ACADEMIC SUBJECT TAUGHT: • Academic Major or • Graduate Degree or • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Major in Subject Area Taught) * or accepted comparable exam • Academic Major or • Graduate Degree or • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Major in Subject Area Taught) OR High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation 60

HOUSE for Secondary Competency is demonstrated by meeting BOTH of the following criteria: 1. HOUSE for Secondary Competency is demonstrated by meeting BOTH of the following criteria: 1. 2. At least one creditable year of teaching experience in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field; and A minimum of 24 points (at least 6 of which represent the subject to be taught) derived from— Experience teaching at the secondary level in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ]; College coursework in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or Professional development in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ]. 61

“Closely Related Fields” for Secondary HOUSE English Reading Speech Journalism Reading/LA English Speech Journalism “Closely Related Fields” for Secondary HOUSE English Reading Speech Journalism Reading/LA English Speech Journalism History Geography Government Economics Pol Sci Economics Government History Geography Pol Sci Geography History Economics Government Pol Sci Civics/Govt History Economics Geography Pol. Science Life Sci Physical Sci Biology Earth Sci Physics Chemistry Arts Art Music Theatre Arts Dance Mathematics Engineering Statistics Accounting Foreign Languages None 62

Secondary HOUSE Activity Scenario 3 63 Secondary HOUSE Activity Scenario 3 63

Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Marilyn is beginning her second year as a Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Marilyn is beginning her second year as a teacher at your high school. She teaches 5 sections of English and 1 of history. She has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education, as well as a master’s degree in English. She has 9 hours of history courses on her college transcript, but no hours in related fields (govt. , economics, etc). She has secondary English certification and has taught 18 years. She began teaching in 1969, so she has not taken any Ex. CET/TEx. ES exams. To date, she has received 45 hours of professional development 64 in history.

Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 3 Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 3 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Marilyn is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 65

Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Marilyn is beginning her second year as a Scenario 3: Is Marilyn Highly Qualified? Marilyn is beginning her second year as a teacher at your high school. She teaches 5 sections of English and 1 of history. She has a bachelor’s degree in secondary education, as well as a master’s degree in English. She has 9 hours of history courses on her college transcript, but no hours in related fields (govt. , economics, etc). She has secondary English certification and has taught 18 years. She began teaching in 1969, so she has not taken any Ex. CET/TEx. ES exams. To date, she has received 45 hours of professional development in history. Bachelor’s? Y Certified? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES in English? N Ex. CET/TEx. ES in History? N English: College major, a graduate degree, or equivalent to a major? Y History, College major, a graduate degree, or equivalent to a major? N Is she HQ in her primary assignment (English)? Y HOUSE (for History): Experience in History? 1 yr Course hours in History: 9 hrs Prof. Dev. in History: 45 hrs = 3 pts Total Points in History: 13 pts Is she HQ in History? N Marilyn is HQ in primary assignment, but not HQ in every course she teaches (History). 66

Scenario 3: Notes on Marilyn On the HQ survey report, Marilyn would be counted Scenario 3: Notes on Marilyn On the HQ survey report, Marilyn would be counted as HQ on the top of the form because she is highly qualified in her primary assignment. To gain HQ status in history, Marilyn will need to either take the appropriate TEx. ES subject area test, take college coursework, or gain enough CPE credits to reach 24 points via HOUSE. Under HOUSE 6 points must be in the subject area being taught, not just a closely-related field. 67

Special Education Elementary 68 Special Education Elementary 68

NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Special Education Core Academic Subject Areas) All core academic subject NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Special Education Core Academic Subject Areas) All core academic subject teachers must be HQ by end of SY 2005 -2006. Title I, Part A teachers must be HQ when hired. Bachelor’s Degree Full State Special Education Certification Demonstrates Subject Competency Elementary Secondary 69

Elementary Special Education (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Existing Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES Elementary Special Education (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Existing Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES OR Meet High, Objective, Uniform State Standard of Evaluation 70

Elementary Special Education New Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES Existing The elementary comprehensive Elementary Special Education New Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES Existing The elementary comprehensive Ex. CET exam can be used to show subject competency for PK 6 th grade. Pass Ex. CET or TEx. ES exams meeting subject competency requirements for PK 8 th grade are: OR • EC-12 Special Ed. (Reading/LA or Math) • 4 -8 Generalist (Reading/LA, Math, Science, Social Studies) Meet High, Content Specific Exam. State • 4 -8 Objective, Uniform Standard of Evaluation 71

Elementary Special Education New Special Education Teachers New Existing who teach multiple subjects and Elementary Special Education New Special Education Teachers New Existing who teach multiple subjects and are highly qualified in math, language arts, or science must Pass Ex. CET demonstrate highly qualified in or TEx. ES other subject areas within 2 years after the date of OR employment. Demonstration of highly qualified in “other” subjects may include using HOUSE options for elementary after one Meet High, Objective, Uniform State creditable year. Evaluation Standard of of experience is obtained. 72

HOUSE A for Elementary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting all three of HOUSE A for Elementary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting all three of the following criteria: 1. At least one creditable year of teaching experience. AND 2. A minimum of 24 points derived from— Experience teaching at the elementary level [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ]; and/or College coursework in English/Language Arts, Math, Science, and/or Social Studies* [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or Professional development that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ]. 73

HOUSE A for Elementary Special Education (cont’d) AND 3. Each of the subjects (English/Language HOUSE A for Elementary Special Education (cont’d) AND 3. Each of the subjects (English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies*) is represented in the 24 points, whether through experience, college coursework, or professional development. [*Note: The social studies requirement may be met through coursework or CPE hours in government, history, economics, geography, or political science. ] 74

Special Education Elementary HOUSE A Activity Scenario 4—Part 1 75 Special Education Elementary HOUSE A Activity Scenario 4—Part 1 75

Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Sue is an elementary special education teacher Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Sue is an elementary special education teacher at your campus. She provides the primary math and reading instruction for her 3 rd-5 th grade students. Sue has a bachelor’s degree, passed the generic all-level special education Ex. CET, and has been teaching the same classes for 8 years. She has 12 hours of college reading courses and has also attended 45 hours of professional development related to reading. She recently passed the Math 4 -8 TEx. ES. Is she highly qualified? 76

Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 4—Part 1 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Sue is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 77

Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Sue is an elementary special education teacher Scenario 4 -1: Is Sue Highly Qualified? Sue is an elementary special education teacher at your campus. She provides the primary math and reading instruction for her 3 rd 5 th grade students. Sue has a bachelor’s degree, passed the generic all-level special education Ex. CET, and has been teaching the same classes for 8 years. She has 12 hours of college reading courses and has also attended 45 hours of professional development related to reading. She recently passed the Math 4 -8 TEx. ES. Is she highly qualified? Special Education Certified? Y Bachelor’s? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES in subject areas? Math: Y Reading: N Math: HQ because of TEx. ES (4 -8 subject area exams demonstrate mastery for PK-6) Reading: HOUSE A: Experience in Reading? 8 yrs Courses: 12 hrs Prof. Dev: 45 hrs = 3 pts Total: 23 pts Sue is HQ in math, but not HQ in reading. 78

Scenario 4 -1: Notes on Sue The special education Ex. CET test is not Scenario 4 -1: Notes on Sue The special education Ex. CET test is not sufficient to prove HQ status for elementary special education teachers. Subject area mastery must be demonstrated through a test or by elementary HOUSE A or B. The TEx. ES 4 -8 subject area exams will demonstrate subject competency for both Special Education and Regular Education teachers in those core subject areas from PK-8. The Elementary comprehensive Ex. CET or the TEx. ES 4 -8 generalist exams can also be used to demonstrate subject matter competency (PK-6 th). 79

HOUSE B for Elementary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the HOUSE B for Elementary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria: The teacher has at least one creditable year of teaching experience. AND 2. The teacher has college coursework equivalent to a college major in the subject to be taught. 1. Intended for departmentalized elementary classes, music, or art. 80

Special Education Elementary HOUSE B Activity Scenario 4—Part 2 81 Special Education Elementary HOUSE B Activity Scenario 4—Part 2 81

Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Let’s change our scenario and say Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Let’s change our scenario and say that Sue has the equivalent of a college major in reading. On her transcript, she has 30 hours of reading courses, 18 of which are upper level. We already know that she has appropriate certification, a bachelor’s degree, and is HQ in math. By using HOUSE B, is she now highly qualified to teach her special education reading courses, as well? 82

Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 4—Part 2 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Sue is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 83

Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Let’s change our scenario and say Scenario 4 -2: Now Is Sue Highly Qualified? Let’s change our scenario and say that Sue has the equivalent of a college major in reading. On her transcript, she has 30 hours of reading courses, 18 of which are upper level. We already know that she has appropriate certification, a bachelor’s degree, and is HQ in math. By using HOUSE B, is she now highly qualified to teach her special education reading courses, as well? Appropriately Certified? Y Bachelor’s? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES in subject areas? Math: Y Reading: N Math: HQ because of TEx. ES Reading: HOUSE B: One year experience? Y Courses: 30 hours (18 upper level) Sue is HQ to teach both math and reading. 84

Scenario 4 -2: More Notes on Sue Although you technically cannot use “college major” Scenario 4 -2: More Notes on Sue Although you technically cannot use “college major” to identify an elementary teacher as HQ without going through HOUSE, the hours taken to attain the major can be used to qualify under HOUSE B. 85

Special Education Secondary 86 Special Education Secondary 86

NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Special Education Core Academic Subject Areas) All core academic subject NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher (Special Education Core Academic Subject Areas) All core academic subject teachers must be HQ by end of SY 2005 -2006. Title I, Part A teachers must be HQ when hired. Bachelor’s Degree Full State Special Education Certification Demonstrates Subject Competency Elementary Secondary 87

Secondary Special Education (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Pass Ex. CET (content specific) or TEx. Secondary Special Education (Demonstrates Subject Competency) New Pass Ex. CET (content specific) or TEx. ES OR FOR ACADEMIC SUBJECT TAUGHT: • Academic Major or • Graduate Degree or • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Major in Subject Area Taught) OR *Meets Elementary Highly Qualified-only applies if teaching exclusively children assessed on alternate achievement standards and providing instruction only at the elementary level. OR *Demonstrates Appropriate Level of Knowledgeonly applies if teaching exclusively children assessed on alternate achievement standards and providing instruction above the elementary level. (same as Sec. Sp. Ed. HOUSE def. ) Existing Pass Ex. CET (content specific) or TEx. ES OR FOR ACADEMIC SUBJECT TAUGHT: • Academic Major or • Graduate Degree or • Coursework (Equivalent to an Undergraduate Major in Subject Area Taught) OR Meets HOUSE for Secondary Sp. Ed. OR *Meets Elementary Highly Qualified-only applies if teaching exclusively children assessed on alternate achievement standards and providing instruction only at the elementary level. OR *Demonstrates Appropriate Level of Knowledgeonly applies if teaching exclusively children assessed on alternate achievement standards and providing instruction above the elementary level. (same as Sec. Sp. Ed. 88 HOUSE def. )

Appropriate Level of Knowledge/HOUSE for Secondary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting both Appropriate Level of Knowledge/HOUSE for Secondary Special Education Competency is demonstrated by meeting both of the following criteria: At least one creditable year of teaching experience in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field; and A minimum of 24 points (at least 6 of which represent the subject to be taught) derived from— Meeting Elementary Highly Qualified (9 points for competency in Reading/Language Arts, Math, Science, or Social Studies) OR Passing an appropriate TEx. ES Certification exam (12 points for any of the following: EC-12 Special Ed. (Reading/LA or Math), 4 -8 Generalist (Reading/LA, Math, Science, or Social Studies), or 4 -8 Content Specific Exam. AND 89

Appropriate Level of Knowledge/HOUSE for Secondary Special Education (Continued) Experience teaching at the secondary Appropriate Level of Knowledge/HOUSE for Secondary Special Education (Continued) Experience teaching at the secondary level in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 year = 1 point (maximum of 12 points) ]; and/or College coursework in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field [ 1 college hour = 1 point ]; and/or Professional development in the subject to be taught or in a closely related field that meets the standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credit established by SBEC rules [ 15 CPE clock hours = 1 point ]. 90

Special Notes Related to Secondary Special Education If using the Elementary HOUSE option for Special Notes Related to Secondary Special Education If using the Elementary HOUSE option for documenting the 9 points for meeting the standard for Elementary Highly Qualified, the teacher MAY NOT count the same college coursework or professional development for meeting Elementary HOUSE and Secondary Special Education HOUSE. If using the Elementary teaching experience under the Elementary HOUSE option for documenting the 9 points for meeting the standard for Elementary Highly Qualified, the teacher may only count a maximum of 12 years teaching experience in any combination under this HOUSE option. Districts may allow 6 points of college coursework or professional development for Special Education strategies or modifications courses or trainings. 91

Special Education Secondary HOUSE Activity Scenario 5 92 Special Education Secondary HOUSE Activity Scenario 5 92

Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Kelly is a secondary special education teacher who Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Kelly is a secondary special education teacher who teaches reading and math to 7 th-12 th grade special education students. She holds a bachelor’s degree, has taken and passed the EC-12 special education TEx. ES, and has 2 years of experience teaching these same classes. On her transcript, she has 6 hours of reading, 6 hours of English, and 3 hours of math. Over the past two summers, she has accumulated 24 hours of professional development from math-related workshops and 6 hours in special education modifications. Is she highly qualified? 93

Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 5 Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 5 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Kelly is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 94

Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Kelly is a secondary special education teacher who Scenario 5: Is Kelly Highly Qualified? Kelly is a secondary special education teacher who teaches reading and math to 7 th-12 th grade special education students. She holds a bachelor’s degree, has taken and passed the EC-12 special education TEx. ES, and has 2 years of experience teaching these same classes. On her transcript, she has 6 hours of reading, 6 hours of English, and 3 hours of math. Over the past two summers, she has accumulated 24 hours of professional development from math-related workshops and 6 hours in special education modifications. Is she highly qualified? Special Education Certified? Y Bachelor’s? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES in subject areas? Math Y (Through Grade 8) Reading Y (Through Grade 8) th and 8 th Grade: HQ via EC-12 special 7 education TEx. ES (Reading and Math) 9 th-12 th: Secondary Special Education HOUSE: Reading: Passed EC-12 TEx. ES: Subject area Experience College hours (rdg/related): Total: 12 pts 2 yrs 12 hrs 26 pts HQ in Reading 9 -12? Y Math: Passed EC-12 TEx. ES: Subject area Experience: College hours (math): Prof. Dev. (math/Sp. Ed. -30 hours): Total: 12 pts 2 yrs 3 hrs 2 pts 19 pts HQ in Math 9 -12? N Kelly is HQ in all areas except high school math. 95

Scenario 5: Notes on Kelly TEx. ES EC-12 Special Education exam can only be Scenario 5: Notes on Kelly TEx. ES EC-12 Special Education exam can only be used to demonstrate subject area competency for Reading/Language Arts and Math for grades EC-8. Other subject areas for EC-8 and all subject areas in 912 require subject area competency beyond the special education exam. Kelly did not need to use Elementary HOUSE to be considered HQ. If she had used it, her years of experience could not be duplicate counted on the special education worksheet and the Elementary HOUSE worksheet. 96

Special Cases 97 Special Cases 97

Teachers of Limited-English Proficient (LEP) Students Teachers of limited-English proficient (LEP) students must meet Teachers of Limited-English Proficient (LEP) Students Teachers of limited-English proficient (LEP) students must meet the “highly qualified” requirements that apply to elementary teachers or secondary teachers for the core academic subject areas taught, as appropriate, in addition to the state requirement to hold the required English as a Second Language (ESL) or Bilingual certification. 98

Teachers Certified Outside of Texas Teachers who are certified in another State meet the Teachers Certified Outside of Texas Teachers who are certified in another State meet the requirements of “highly qualified” if they have a valid out-of-state teaching certificate, a Bachelor’s degree, can demonstrate subject area competency, and hold a valid Texas One. Year Certificate. 99

Teachers Certified Outside of Texas Prior to or during the validity of the oneyear Teachers Certified Outside of Texas Prior to or during the validity of the oneyear certificate, the teacher must meet the state’s certification testing requirements; otherwise, the teacher will not be considered highly qualified after the One. Year Certificate has expired. 100

Out of-State Certification Activity Scenario 6 101 Out of-State Certification Activity Scenario 6 101

Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Bob has a bachelor’s degree and has taught Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Bob has a bachelor’s degree and has taught biology for 10 years in Oklahoma. He recently moved across the state line, obtained a job teaching biology in a Texas district, and holds a valid Texas one-year certificate. On his transcript, Bob has 12 hours of biology and 18 hours of chemistry. Is he highly qualified? 102

Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 6 Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 6 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Bob is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 103

Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Bob has a bachelor’s degree and has taught Scenario 6: Is Bob Highly Qualified? Bob has a bachelor’s degree and has taught biology for 10 years in Oklahoma. He recently moved across the state line, obtained a job teaching biology in a Texas district, and holds a valid Texas one-year certificate. On his transcript, Bob has 12 hours of biology and 18 hours of chemistry. Is he highly qualified? Certified? Y (one year) Bachelor’s? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES in biology? N Major/Equivalent in biology? N Secondary HOUSE: Biology: Subject area Experience: 10 yrs College hours: Biology: 12 hrs Chemistry (related): 18 hrs Total: 40 pts HQ in Biology? Y (Temporary) Bob is HQ in biology for the current school year. 104

Scenario 6: Notes on Bob must hold or be eligible for a one-year Texas Scenario 6: Notes on Bob must hold or be eligible for a one-year Texas certificate. Once Bob’s one-year certificate expires, he will lose his HQ status unless he has passed the TEx. ES exam for his teaching area. Bob needs to check with SBEC to see if any out-of-state tests he has taken may be deemed “comparable” to a Texas test. If the district chose to do so, Bob could have used 2 points toward HOUSE for each secondary out-of-state certification examination or national assessment instrument for teacher licensing taken in the core academic subject or closely related field. An elementary teacher could have done the same for any elementary 105 level exams taken.

International Teacher Exchange Programs Teachers who come to teach in Texas schools and who International Teacher Exchange Programs Teachers who come to teach in Texas schools and who will be employed for no more than three years meet the definition of “highly qualified” if a foreign credential evaluation service verifies that: 1) the degree held is at least equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree offered by an American institution of higher education; 2) the teacher holds valid teaching credentials in his/her country; and 3) the teacher demonstrates competency. 106

Elementary DAEPs and AEPs At the elementary school level, teachers who provide instruction and Elementary DAEPs and AEPs At the elementary school level, teachers who provide instruction and assignments in DAEPs or AEPs must meet the same “highly qualified” requirements as all elementary school teachers. 107

Secondary DAEPs and AEPs At the middle and high school levels, arrangements could be Secondary DAEPs and AEPs At the middle and high school levels, arrangements could be made for independent study opportunities or distance learning methods, where an off-site teacher of record provides materials and lessons for the student. In such cases, the on-site teacher would not serve as the primary teacher (the teacher of record) but would assist in the teaching and learning. The teacher of record must meet the definition of “highly qualified. ” Note: Teacher of record does not necessarily meet TEC 37. 008 requirements. 108

Long-Term Substitutes An individual that is hired to substitute for a teacher while the Long-Term Substitutes An individual that is hired to substitute for a teacher while the teacher is out sick or on leave is not considered the teacher of record and is not required to meet the requirements of “highly qualified. ” 109

Long-Term Substitutes However, if an individual is hired to substitute for a teacher who Long-Term Substitutes However, if an individual is hired to substitute for a teacher who has not been hired, the substitute becomes the teacher of record and must meet the requirements of a “highly qualified” teacher. Parent notification requirements apply. 110

Highly Qualified Flexibility for Rural Schools 111 Highly Qualified Flexibility for Rural Schools 111

Who is Eligible for Rural Flexibility? LEA’s who were eligible for REAP flexibility and Who is Eligible for Rural Flexibility? LEA’s who were eligible for REAP flexibility and the Small Rural School Achievement Program through USDE. This generally applies to LEA’s with 600 or fewer ADA with a school locale code of 7 or 8. 112

Rural Flexibility for NEW Teachers Applies to teachers hired by the LEA for the Rural Flexibility for NEW Teachers Applies to teachers hired by the LEA for the 2004 -2005 school year or beyond. States that newly hired teachers in eligible LEA’s who teach two or more subjects and are highly qualified in at least one core academic subject they teach will have three years from the date of hire to become highly qualified in each core academic subject they teach. 113

Rural Flexibility for EXISTING Teachers Applies to teachers teaching at the LEA during the Rural Flexibility for EXISTING Teachers Applies to teachers teaching at the LEA during the 2003 -2004 school year. States that teachers who teach two or more subjects and are highly qualified in at least one core academic subject area they teach, but do not meet all the criteria for a highly qualified teacher in each of the core academic subjects they teach, will have until the end of the 20062007 school year to become highly qualified in each subject they teach. 114

To Utilize Rural Flexibility, LEA’s Must: Ensure that all teachers in core academic subjects To Utilize Rural Flexibility, LEA’s Must: Ensure that all teachers in core academic subjects are highly qualified in at least one core academic subject they teach. Provide high-quality professional development that increases the teachers’ content knowledge in the additional subjects they teach. Provide mentoring or a program of intensive supervision that consists of structured guidance and regular, on-going support so they become highly qualified in the additional core academic 115 subject(s) they teach.

Rural Schools Flexibility Activity Scenario 7 116 Rural Schools Flexibility Activity Scenario 7 116

Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Lisa was hired at the beginning of the Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Lisa was hired at the beginning of the 2004 -05 school year by your rural school district to teach five secondary English classes and 2 biology classes. She was fully certified via TEx. ES to teach English, but not science. On her transcript, she has 6 hours of biology and 6 hours of chemistry. She has taken 30 hours of professional development related to science. Is she HQ? 117

Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 7 Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Using the forms located in the Scenario 7 section of your Activity Booklet, decide if you think Lisa is highly qualified. After a few minutes, we will discuss our findings as a group. 118

Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Lisa was hired at the beginning of the Scenario 7: Is Lisa Highly Qualified? Lisa was hired at the beginning of the 2004 -05 school year by your rural school district to teach five secondary English classes and 2 biology classes. She was fully certified via TEx. ES to teach English, but not science. On her transcript, she has 6 hours of biology and 6 hours of chemistry. She has taken 30 hours of professional development related to science. Is she HQ? Certified? Y Bachelor’s? Y Ex. CET/TEx. ES? English: Y Science: N Secondary HOUSE: Science: Subject area Experience: 1 yr College hours: Biology: 6 hrs Chemistry (related) 6 hrs Prof. Dev. : 30 hrs = 2 pts Total: 15 pts Is Lisa HQ in English? Y Is Lisa HQ in Science? N 119

Scenario 7: Notes on Lisa is HQ in English; therefore, on the HQ survey, Scenario 7: Notes on Lisa is HQ in English; therefore, on the HQ survey, she can be counted as HQ in her primary field. However, the science classes would be reported as being taught by a non-HQ teacher. Lisa has until the end of 2006 -07 (3 years) to either: take more coursework, gain more Professional Development hours to qualify via HOUSE, or take the appropriate TEx. ES. Lisa was able to use the HOUSE option to prove HQ status because she had completed one full year of teaching science. NOTE: If Lisa had been hired in 05 -06, she would not be eligible to attempt the HOUSE option because she did not have one full year of experience yet. Although HQ surveys are not submitted until summer, data must be collected during the current school year. 120

Reporting 121 Reporting 121

State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements • Increase in the percentage of State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements • Increase in the percentage of highly qualified teachers for each LEA and campus so that ALL teachers teaching in core academic subject areas are “highly qualified” no later than the end of the 2005 -2006 school year. • • Annual Highly Qualified Teacher Compliance Report Parent Notification Requirements 122

Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB 123 Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB 123

Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB • Strategies and activities to ensure LEA Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB • Strategies and activities to ensure LEA is making progress toward meeting measurable achievement objectives: • Percent of highly qualified teachers (HQT) • Percent of classes taught by HQT • Percent of classes in high poverty schools taught by HQT • Percent of teachers receiving high-quality professional development 124

Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB 2005 -2006 Targets *100% - percent of Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB 2005 -2006 Targets *100% - percent of HQT *100% - percent of classes taught by HQT *100% - percent of classes in high-poverty school taught by HQT *100% - percent of teachers receiving high -quality professional development 125

Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB Each LEA and campus must have a Plan for Teacher Quality Requirements under NCLB Each LEA and campus must have a recruitment and retention plan that describes strategies to: Increase percentage of HQT on each campus to meet 100% by end of 2005 -06, or later if exceptions apply (i. e. rural schools and special education) Ensure low-income students and minority students are not taught at higher rates than other student groups by teachers who are not HQ Attract and retain HQT Assist teachers not currently HQ to meet the HQ requirements in a timely manner 126

Paraprofessionals 127 Paraprofessionals 127

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties working in Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties working in a Title I, Part A program must have a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent. 128

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Paraprofessionals with instructional duties hired before January 8, Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Paraprofessionals with instructional duties hired before January 8, 2002, must satisfy the following requirements by the end of the 20052006 school year. Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a Title I, Part A program must meet one of three criteria in statute when hired. 129

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications The term “instructional support duties” means that the Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications The term “instructional support duties” means that the paraprofessional is actively assisting in providing direct instruction to students. Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a Title I, Part A program must meet one of three criteria in statute when hired. 130

Title I, Part A The term “instructional support duties” Paraprofessionalparaprofessional is actively Qualifications means Title I, Part A The term “instructional support duties” Paraprofessionalparaprofessional is actively Qualifications means that the assisting in providing direct instruction to students. Any paraprofessional with instructional support duties hired after January 8, 2002, and working in a Title I, Part A program must meet one of three criteria in statuteshould refer to a LEAs when hired. paraprofessional’s job description to determine whether the qualification requirements apply. 131

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR 132

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR For purposes of Title I, Part A in Texas, two years of study at an institution of higher education is defined as completion of 48 semester hours or equivalent trimester hours, or as defined by the institution, whichever is less. 133

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Statute does not list any required field of Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications Statute does not list any required field of study. 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR For purposes of Title I, Part A in Texas, two years of study at an institution of higher education is defined as completion of 48 semester hours or equivalent trimester hours, or as defined by the institution, whichever is less. 134

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR 135

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR Statute does not list any required field of study. 136

Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher Title I, Part A Paraprofessional Qualifications 2 years of study at institution of higher education; OR Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR Meet a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate, through a formal state or local academic assessment. 137

Title I, Part A • Knowledge of, and the ability to assist Paraprofessional Qualifications Title I, Part A • Knowledge of, and the ability to assist Paraprofessional Qualifications in, instruction of reading, writing, and mathematics; or • Knowledge of, and the ability to assist in, instruction of reading readiness, writing 2 years of readiness, institution of higher study at and mathematics readiness, as education; appropriate. OR Associate’s (or higher) degree; OR Meet a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate, through a formal state or local academic assessment. 138

Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002 Any Title I, Part Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002 Any Title I, Part A paraprofessional with instructional support duties in the core academic subject areas hired after January 8, 2002, who does not meet the paraprofessional qualifications, must be provided a rigorous academic assessment as soon as possible. School districts are advised that any newly hired Title I, Part A paraprofessional must meet the paraprofessional qualifications before being hired. 139

Paraprofessional Qualifications Exceptions: Paraprofessional who is proficient in English and a language other than Paraprofessional Qualifications Exceptions: Paraprofessional who is proficient in English and a language other than English who provides services solely by acting as a translator; or Paraprofessional whose duties consist solely of conducting Title I, Part A parental involvement activities. 140

Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals with Instructional Duties in Core Academic Subject Areas No Title I, Part A Paraprofessionals with Instructional Duties in Core Academic Subject Areas No Campus Receives Title I, Part A funds? Qualifications Not Applicable Yes Targeted Assistance or Schoolwide Campus? Targeted Assistance campus: ONLY a paraprofessional with instructional duties in core academic subject areas whose salary is paid with Title I, Part A funds. Schoolwide campus: ALL paraprofessionals with instructional duties in core academic subject areas without regard to the source of funding of 141 the position.

Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002, must meet ONE of these three criteria when Paraprofessionals hired after January 8, 2002, must meet ONE of these three criteria when hired Paraprofessionals hired on or before January 8, 2002, must meet ONE of these three criteria by end of 2005 -06 school year. Option 1: Two years of study at an institution of higher education. Option 2: An associate’s (or higher) degree. Option 3: A rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate through a formal academic assessment, knowledge of, and the ability to assist in, instruction of reading (or reading readiness), writing (or writing readiness), and mathematics (or mathematics readiness), as appropriate. 142

Portability of Paraprofessional Qualifications When hiring a Title I, Part A paraprofessional who will Portability of Paraprofessional Qualifications When hiring a Title I, Part A paraprofessional who will have instructional support duties, local policy should determine whether the school district will accept the assessment results from another school district or openenrollment charter school or require the paraprofessional to take the local assessment used by the hiring campus or school district. For consistency, school districts may want to consider having all campuses within the school district use the same instruments and processes for assessing paraprofessionals. 143

State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements • • Percentage of Title I, State and LEA Annual Planning and Reporting Requirements • • Percentage of Title I, Part A paraprofessionals who meet the Section 1119 qualifications Reported on Title I, Part A Annual Compliance Report in e. Grants 144

For additional information, contact the Division of NCLB Program Coordination at TEA. www. tea. For additional information, contact the Division of NCLB Program Coordination at TEA. www. tea. state. tx. us/nclb/ [email protected] state. tx. us 145