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 Summer Term Governor Briefing 16 and 17 June 2014 Department of Children’s Services Summer Term Governor Briefing 16 and 17 June 2014 Department of Children’s Services

Education and Schools Update Summer Term Governor Briefing Monday 16 June Tuesday 17 June Education and Schools Update Summer Term Governor Briefing Monday 16 June Tuesday 17 June Future House Eastwood Primary School Paul Makin George Mc. Queen Assistant Director Assistant Director Education and School Improvement Access and Inclusion Department of Children’s Services

Overview • Peer Review feedback • Ofsted feedback • Refresh of the school prioritisation Overview • Peer Review feedback • Ofsted feedback • Refresh of the school prioritisation process • “Promoting Bradford District” • Attendance results and how Governors can help encourage attendance

Peer Review feedback • Overall Strengths – – – – Relationships Personnel / people Peer Review feedback • Overall Strengths – – – – Relationships Personnel / people Open communications A commitment to inclusivity Data dashboards Emerging capacity Vision and aspiration at the most senior level

Peer Review feedback • Areas for Development – Bring corporate aspirations to life for Peer Review feedback • Areas for Development – Bring corporate aspirations to life for headteachers – Joining up the system to ensure the clear pathway of learning and achievement for children and young people – Demonstrate impact – Further explore strategies to pick up pace – Evaluation the impact of spend / investment

Ofsted feedback – February 2014 Children who need help and protection Requires Improvement Children Ofsted feedback – February 2014 Children who need help and protection Requires Improvement Children looked after and achieving permanence Good Adoption performance Good Experiences and progress of care leavers Good Leadership, management and governance The effectiveness of the Local Safeguarding Children Board The overall judgement Good Requires Improvement

School Prioritisation Process School Prioritisation Process

“Promoting Bradford District” “Promoting Bradford District”

Attendance Results Autumn Term 2012 – Autumn Term 2013 • Primary attendance rose from Attendance Results Autumn Term 2012 – Autumn Term 2013 • Primary attendance rose from 94. 9% to 95. 7% (+0. 8%) Secondary attendance rose from 93. 7% to 94. 2% (+0. 5%) • The number of pupils with less than 85% attendance (persistent absence) in Bradford schools reduced by 776 in primary schools and by 1051 in secondary schools • Attendance and persistent absence in Bradford primary and secondary schools remains below national and regional averages. • Bradford’s levels of unauthorised absence remain higher than national averages. This is due to Bradford schools taking a firm line on challenging the reasons for absence provided by parents.

Df. E Updated Guidance (April 2014) ‘Careers guidance and inspiration in Schools’: statutory guidance Df. E Updated Guidance (April 2014) ‘Careers guidance and inspiration in Schools’: statutory guidance for governing bodies, school leaders and school staff • Revised guidance reflects findings outlined in Ofsted review of first year of ‘duty’ on schools to secure independent careers guidance for all year 8 -13 pupils. • ‘Going in the right direction? ’ (Sept 13) found that only 1 in 5 (60 schools visited) had ensured that all students received ‘sufficient information to consider a wide breadth of career possibilities. ’ • Careers guidance given ‘a higher priority’ by inspectors since Sept 2013. How well a school delivers advice and guidance to all pupils is now taken into account when judging ‘leadership and management’.

 • Revised guidance requires governing bodies to ensure that all pupils are provided • Revised guidance requires governing bodies to ensure that all pupils are provided with independent careers guidance from Year 8 to Year 13. • Governors must ensure careers guidance: – Is presented in an impartial manner – Includes information on the range of education or training options, including apprenticeships and other vocational pathways – Is guidance that the person giving it considers will promote the best interests of the pupils to whom it is given • Governing body should provide ‘clear advice to the head teacher’ on which to base a strategy for advice and guidance, which is appropriately resourced and meets the school’s legal requirements. ’ • This strategy should be ‘embedded within a clear framework linked to outcomes for pupils rather than an ad-hoc set of activities. ’

 • Revised guidance also emphasises the importance of: – Links with employers, the • Revised guidance also emphasises the importance of: – Links with employers, the importance of work experience, employer mentoring, links to the local labour market, opportunities to develop entrepreneurial skills – The importance of Maths and English and the STEM subjects and the need to encourage more girls to continue their studies in STEM subjects as they get older The need for impartial CIAG that covers the full range of post-16 options. Schools are advised that they should give ‘… other providers who wish to do so the opportunity to inform pupils directly about what they offer. ’

 • Other related policy areas to consider (also covered in revised guidance): – • Other related policy areas to consider (also covered in revised guidance): – Full implementation of Raising the Participation Age (RPA) – (young people have a ‘duty’ to participate until 18 th birthday) – The provision of targeted support for vulnerable and disadvantaged young people (‘vulnerable to non-participation’) – Requirements around information sharing with the LA (with emphasis on the importance the Df. E’s published ‘Destination Measures’) – The SEN Reforms and new legislation in Children and Families Act (e. g. phasing out of Statements of SEN, introduction of Education, Health and Care Plans, emphasis on ‘Preparing for Adulthood’ outcomes, etc. )

Working with the Virtual School for Looked After Children Linda Mason, Head of the Working with the Virtual School for Looked After Children Linda Mason, Head of the Virtual School

 • • Legislative changes/Policy 2013 Performance Pupil Premium Plus Role of designated governor • • Legislative changes/Policy 2013 Performance Pupil Premium Plus Role of designated governor

Children and Family Act 2014 • Staying put - foster care until 21 • Children and Family Act 2014 • Staying put - foster care until 21 • Virtual School Head Teacher duty to appoint an officer to promote educational achievement

Pupil Premium Plus • • • BSO bulletin (Conditions of Grant) £ 1900 1 Pupil Premium Plus • • • BSO bulletin (Conditions of Grant) £ 1900 1 April 2014 LAC from day 1, adopted Retained by VSH identified and agreed programme funding then given to schools • Passport to school £ 633 per term Sept (on roll in May) March (Jan) December (Oct) • Accountability – DT/ VSH PEP, website

Bradford LAC Performance Latest Statistical First Release SFR December 2013: Attainment KS 1, KS Bradford LAC Performance Latest Statistical First Release SFR December 2013: Attainment KS 1, KS 2, KS 4 SEN Exclusions Absence LAC Return (SSDA 903) Emotional and behavioural health SDQ scores Up to date health measures Offending Substance misuse

Headlines • Poorer outcomes but improving over time • GCSE results improving • The Headlines • Poorer outcomes but improving over time • GCSE results improving • The attainment gap has reduced • LAC still face significant challenges

Bradford KS 1 Level 2 Reading % Writing % Maths % England LAC 69 Bradford KS 1 Level 2 Reading % Writing % Maths % England LAC 69 61 71 Region LAC 68 67 67 Bradford LAC 67 59 63 All Bradford 83 80 87

Bradford KS 2 % achieving at least level 4 Maths Reading Writing GPS England Bradford KS 2 % achieving at least level 4 Maths Reading Writing GPS England LAC 59 63 55 45 Region LAC 57 60 52 41 Bradford LAC 60 65 60 40 All Bradford 79 79 81 68

 Bradford KS 4 % achieving 5 GCSEs A*- C A* - C inc Bradford KS 4 % achieving 5 GCSEs A*- C A* - C inc En Ma England LAC 36. 6 15. 3 Region LAC 38. 0 14. 1 Bradford LAC 37. 0 7 All Bradford 83. 4 53. 0

Bradford SEN Data SEN without Statement SEN with Statement All SEN England LAC 39. Bradford SEN Data SEN without Statement SEN with Statement All SEN England LAC 39. 3 28. 5 67. 8 Region LAC 42. 4 24. 1 66. 5 Bradford LAC * 41. 1 21. 5 62. 7 All Bradford 17. 32 1. 9 19. 32

Bradford Exclusions % children permanently excluded % children with at least one fixed term Bradford Exclusions % children permanently excluded % children with at least one fixed term exclusion England LAC 0. 15 11. 36 Region LAC 0 9. 66 Bradford LAC 0 7. 91 0. 02 4. 37 All Bradford

Bradford Absence % session lost due to Authorised absence Unauthoriseda bsence Overall absence % Bradford Absence % session lost due to Authorised absence Unauthoriseda bsence Overall absence % of LAC persistent absentees 3. 3 1. 1 4. 4 5. 0 Region LAC 3. 0 1. 0 4. 2 Bradford LAC 2. 8 0. 9 3. 8 3. 1 All Bradford 3. 9 1. 8 5. 7 5. 8 England LAC

Personal Education Plans • No longer using EPEP • ICS for PEPs • BSO Personal Education Plans • No longer using EPEP • ICS for PEPs • BSO for Attendance, Attainment, Exclusions and SEN

ICS for PEPS • It will be the responsibility of the Social Worker to ICS for PEPS • It will be the responsibility of the Social Worker to complete the Personal Education Plan • The targets can be completed when agreed at the PEP meeting • The PEP will capture the child’s views • Social Workers will provide Designated Teachers with a copy once completed

What should a good PEP include? • Suitable Targets attainment and other • Pupil What should a good PEP include? • Suitable Targets attainment and other • Pupil Premium • Educational Arrangements (provision, interventions) • Development Needs • The Child’s Views

Bradford Schools Online • Attendance, Exclusions and SEN will be available to view through Bradford Schools Online • Attendance, Exclusions and SEN will be available to view through Bradford Schools online. • Attainment is required to be inputted by designated teachers through BSO on a termly basis

Why? • Problems accessing EPEP • To aggregate the data • To track the Why? • Problems accessing EPEP • To aggregate the data • To track the attainment of LAC from KS 1 to KS 5 • Will hold live data • Easy to identify where data has not been entered

Role of Governors • Statutory Guidance due for refresh: • Statutory Framework • Role Role of Governors • Statutory Guidance due for refresh: • Statutory Framework • Role of governing body • Role of designated teacher in school, in managing the PEP, relationship with other beyond school

Governors must: • ensure designated teacher undertakes appropriate training • consider and annual report Governors must: • ensure designated teacher undertakes appropriate training • consider and annual report from the designated teacher • together with school leadership consider and act on issues raised so as to support the designated teacher and maximise impact of the role

10 Key Questions 1. Has the DT had appropriate training to carry out the 10 Key Questions 1. Has the DT had appropriate training to carry out the role? 2. What arrangements are in place to allow DT time and resources to carry out the role? 3. How does SLT have oversight of this role and the progress of/issues for LAC? 4. How does the DT manage the PEP meetings? 5. How are staff informed about LAC?

Cont…. 6. What training have staff had about LAC? 7. How does the school Cont…. 6. What training have staff had about LAC? 7. How does the school support LAC who are new to the school? 8. How are additional resources (PPP) used to raise achievement? 9. Are there any school related issues that prevent LAC achieving? 10. What arrangements are in place that have contributed to successful provision and for the LAC to make good or better progress?

School Website • The amount of the school’s allocation from the Pupil Premium Grant School Website • The amount of the school’s allocation from the Pupil Premium Grant for the current academic year, and: how it is intended that this will be spent AND how the previous academic year’s allocation was spent, and the effect of this on the educational attainment of pupils for whom the funding was allocated

Any Questions? Any Questions?

Diversity and Cohesion: Education Service for New Communities and Travellers: June 14 Paul Johnson, Diversity and Cohesion: Education Service for New Communities and Travellers: June 14 Paul Johnson, Service Coordinator

The ____ ? Their economy is in a mess. They can’t make money, they The ____ ? Their economy is in a mess. They can’t make money, they have no jobs at home, so they come over here to mess up our economy and to take our jobs. And why is there so much unemployment in their own country? Because they’re a lazy lot, who don’t want to work.

Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Works with families from many of the Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Works with families from many of the groups who have recently moved to the Bradford District i. e. • Asylum Seekers • Refugees • Central and Eastern European Migrant Workers

Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Staffing 1. 0 Co-ordinator 1. 0 Access Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Staffing 1. 0 Co-ordinator 1. 0 Access Leader 2. 5 EU Liaison Officers 1. 5 Refugee/Asylum Liaison Officers 0. 6 Teaching and Learning Leader 1. 5 Teaching and Learning Consultants 0. 8 Administrator Casual Interpreters

National Legislation National Legislation

Rights to Education The Education Act 1944, as amended by the Education Act 1996, Rights to Education The Education Act 1944, as amended by the Education Act 1996, places Local Education Authorities under a duty to make education available for all school aged children in their area, appropriate to their age, abilities and aptitudes. This duty extends to all children residing in their area, whether permanently or temporarily.

Equality Act 2010 5 th April 2011 the Public Sector Equality Duty (The Equality Equality Act 2010 5 th April 2011 the Public Sector Equality Duty (The Equality Duty) came into force. The three aims of the General duty are to: • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Act • Advance equality of opportunity between groups who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. • Foster good relationships between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not.

School inspection handbook: Reference no: 120101: April 2014 Depending on the type of school, School inspection handbook: Reference no: 120101: April 2014 Depending on the type of school, it may be relevant to pay particular attention to the achievement of: • • • disabled pupils, and those who have special educational needs those with protected characteristics, including Gypsy, Roma and Traveller children, [1] as defined by the Equality Act 2010 boys girls the highest and lowest attainers pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support, including: looked after children[2] pupils known to be eligible for free school meals – a school is unlikely to be judged outstanding if these pupils are not making at least good progress those attending alternative provision[3]. [1] Pupils with protected characteristics and other groups of pupils may include: pupils for whom English is an additional language; minority ethnic pupils; Gypsy Roma and Traveller children; lesbian, gay and bisexual pupils; transgender pupils; young carers; and other vulnerable groups.

Moral Compass? We all have a responsibility to provide the best possible education for Moral Compass? We all have a responsibility to provide the best possible education for all children.

Bradford Context Bradford Context

The Bradford District has had a significant minority ethnic population since the 1960 s The Bradford District has had a significant minority ethnic population since the 1960 s and due to its industrial heritage has had migration for many years previously. One of the most recent groups of people to come to Bradford are from Central and Eastern Europe.

The majority of the Migrant Worker families coming to the Bradford District originally came The majority of the Migrant Worker families coming to the Bradford District originally came from Slovakia, Poland the Czech Republic.

Changing Demographics? Migrants from Pakistan were the largest group coming into the Bradford in Changing Demographics? Migrants from Pakistan were the largest group coming into the Bradford in 2011. Migration from Central and Eastern European Countries e. g. Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic in total exceeded the number from Pakistan.

Increasing Numbers of Children and Young People? Increasing Numbers of Children and Young People?

Where do EU Migrant Worker Families Live? Where do EU Migrant Worker Families Live?

New challenges for schools, colleges and settings: • • • Communication/interpretation Increased number of New challenges for schools, colleges and settings: • • • Communication/interpretation Increased number of New to English pupils Some children/young people living in poverty Increased number of In Year admissions Increasing need for awareness of the cultural and socio economic background of the families.

Services Provided • Support schools to develop the capacity to meet the needs of Services Provided • Support schools to develop the capacity to meet the needs of Gypsy Roma Travellers (BRTAP) • Assist families to access schools/settings • Facilitate full attendance • Facilitate home school liaison • Provide advice to schools/settings and families. • Liaise with the range of statutory and voluntary agencies with regard to the education and welfare of the Services client groups. • Encourage the use of culturally relevant resources

As with other ethnic minority children and young people those from Central and Eastern As with other ethnic minority children and young people those from Central and Eastern Europe enhance the school community bringing with them rich diverse cultural heritages and helping school communities to have broadening horizons of the world.

Questions/Discussion Questions/Discussion

Contact details Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Children’s Services Future House Bolling Contact details Education Service for New Communities and Travellers Children’s Services Future House Bolling Road Bradford BD 4 7 EB T: 01274 385558 M: 07582 109 140 E: newcommunities. travellers@bradford. gov. uk © Bradford Education Service for New Communities and Travellers 2014

Family Learning Pauline Thorpe, Team Leader (Community & Family Learning) Children’s Services, Future House Family Learning Pauline Thorpe, Team Leader (Community & Family Learning) Children’s Services, Future House

Family Learning • Small team based in Future House • Freelance tutors • Engage Family Learning • Small team based in Future House • Freelance tutors • Engage parents to support their children • Improve the home learning environment • Embed English and/or maths in courses

Background • Funded by Business Innovation & Skills to work with hard to reach Background • Funded by Business Innovation & Skills to work with hard to reach parents in areas of multiple deprivation • Range of engagement and progression activities/programmes to reach up to 1500 parents a year • Change of focus, funding now comes under Community Learning – more responsive.

The Impact of Parental Involvement by Professor Charles Desforges with Alberto Abouchaar Research Report The Impact of Parental Involvement by Professor Charles Desforges with Alberto Abouchaar Research Report RR 433 June 2003 “to close the social class achievement gap …. a very clear and consistent finding ……. is that parental involvement has a large and positive effect on the outcomes of schooling. This effect is bigger than that of schooling itself. Research consistently shows that what parents do with their children at home is far more important to their achievement than their social class or level of education. It would seem that if the parenting involvement practices of most working class parents could be raised to the levels of the best working class parents in these terms, very significant advances in school achievement might reasonably be expected. This inference from research cannot be said too often. “ The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support & Family Education on Pupil Achievements and Adjustment: A Literature Review.

Effects of parents v Effects of schools Achievement Parents Effects of school Age 7 Effects of parents v Effects of schools Achievement Parents Effects of school Age 7 29% 5% Age 11 27% 21% Age 16 14% 51% From Sacker et al (2002)

What we do • Deliver a range of free courses to engage & progress What we do • Deliver a range of free courses to engage & progress parents & children (BIS contract, parents have to meet the criteria to be eligible) • Deliver courses and workshops under the Parents into Learning banner • Discover and Learn Visits • Early Words Together • Talk English • Nuffield Programme • Families First • Work in Sure Start centres out of area

 Article from TES May 2014 reported on - A key research paper, a Article from TES May 2014 reported on - A key research paper, a 1996 meta-analysis of 39 US studies found that: • During the summer holidays, at best, students showed no academic growth and at worst lost one to three months of learning. • Learning loss was greater in maths than in reading and disadvantaged students were disproportionately affected, losing about twice the ground of other pupils in reading. • A more recent US study, published in 2007, followed people between the ages of 6 and 22. The research team from John Hopkins University in Baltimore found that twothirds of the reading gap between disadvantaged 13 year olds and their peers could be explained by summer learner loss.

What we do • Discover & Learn Visits: – – Aladdin (40 parents & What we do • Discover & Learn Visits: – – Aladdin (40 parents & children), Brassed Off (30 parents & children) War Horse (70 parents & children) Eureka (24 parents & children) • Summer Programmes: Summer Reading and Creative Community • Reading Café

Family Learning • Who needs to know about Family Learning? • Whole school approach Family Learning • Who needs to know about Family Learning? • Whole school approach • Senior management team • Governors • Class teachers • Parents and children

Family Learning Prospectus is on Bradford Schools Online: bso. bradford. gov. uk > Parental Family Learning Prospectus is on Bradford Schools Online: bso. bradford. gov. uk > Parental Involvement > Family Learning Team Email: familylearning@bradford. gov. uk Website: http: //bradfordschools. net/blog/familylearning/ Twitter: https: //twitter. com/Family. Learns

Updates From School Governor Service Updates From School Governor Service

Useful websites New address for Df. E: https: //www. gov. uk/government/organisations/departmentfor-education Df. E information Useful websites New address for Df. E: https: //www. gov. uk/government/organisations/departmentfor-education Df. E information and updates for different types of schools: https: //www. gov. uk/government/collections/mandatoryand-useful-timelines-information-for-schools Pupil premium information: Https: //www. gov. uk/government/publications/pupilpremium-grant-2014 -to-2015 -conditions-of-grant

NGA updates • From summer 2015 half of all infant schools will have their NGA updates • From summer 2015 half of all infant schools will have their KS 1 assessments externally moderated, a greater proportion than currently • Ofsted recommend to government mandatory training for governors – supported by NGA • Ofsted pledged to visit any school across the country to follow up concerns about an unbalanced curriculum or governors abusing their powers.