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 Starter Watch ‘Parliament Uncovered’ on the House of Lords and complete a table Starter Watch ‘Parliament Uncovered’ on the House of Lords and complete a table similar to the one below. What are the differences between Life, Hereditary & People’s Peers? Differences from the Ho. C Similarities with Ho. C

Differences from the Ho. C Unelected Lords (not MPs) – Life, Hereditary & People’s Differences from the Ho. C Unelected Lords (not MPs) – Life, Hereditary & People’s Second Chamber & has a secondary role Not paid Judicial role – includes Law Lords Includes clerics – bishops & archbishops Similarities with Ho. C Scrutinises Debates Select committees (though not departmental) Whips Speaker (though called Lord Chancellor in Ho. L) Acts as a check on govt.

House of Lords Composition & functions House of Lords Composition & functions

Visit: http: //news. bbc. co. uk/1/hi/special_report/1999/01/99/lords_reform/252856. stm Visit: http: //news. bbc. co. uk/1/hi/special_report/1999/01/99/lords_reform/252856. stm

Composition of the Lords n November 1999 House of Lords Act (second stage recently Composition of the Lords n November 1999 House of Lords Act (second stage recently abandoned) First stage of reform of upper house n 92 hereditary peers (c. 10% of total) remained n 10 hereditary peers given life peerages n 2000, Appointments Commission set up to recommend ‘people’s peers’ n 679 peers, 113 women (Feb. 2004) n Baroness Amos. Are women better represented in the Ho. L compared with the Ho. C?

Before reform Before reform

After reform After reform

Key functions Legislative Scrutinising Deliberative Legitimating role Judicial role Key functions Legislative Scrutinising Deliberative Legitimating role Judicial role

Legislative role Ho. L amends & revises Bills sent from Ho. C n More Legislative role Ho. L amends & revises Bills sent from Ho. C n More leisurely pace & less partisan allows for more detailed examination of Bills n Substantive amendments likely to be overturned in Ho. C n

Legislative role Parliament Act, 1911 n n Removed Lords power of veto over public Legislative role Parliament Act, 1911 n n Removed Lords power of veto over public legislation Power to delay Bills for maximum of two years (reduced to 1 year, Parl. Act, 1949) Removed Ho. L power to amend or veto money Bills Powers to veto any proposal to extend life of a Parl. Beyond 5 years

Legislative role Salisbury doctrine (convention) n Conservative Leader of the Lords, Lord Salisbury, 1945 Legislative role Salisbury doctrine (convention) n Conservative Leader of the Lords, Lord Salisbury, 1945 n “Since Labour govt. had a mandate to introduce policies such as nationalisation & welfare state, Lords should not oppose them at second reading”

Scrutinising role Ho. L no structure of departmental select committees n Ho. L can Scrutinising role Ho. L no structure of departmental select committees n Ho. L can set up committees to investigate particular policy areas or subjects n

Scrutinising role Select Committee on European Communities n 6 sub-committees n Investigates Euro policies Scrutinising role Select Committee on European Communities n 6 sub-committees n Investigates Euro policies which raise important questions of policy or principle n Could consider ‘merits’ of proposals as well as detail n Could employ specialist advisers n Widely admired (e. g. Norton)

Scrutinising role Joint committee for scrutinising delegated legislation n Members of both Houses scrutinised Scrutinising role Joint committee for scrutinising delegated legislation n Members of both Houses scrutinised delegated legislation such as statutory instruments n In addition, 1992, Delegated Powers Scrutiny Committee to consider proposed powers to be delegated to ministers under new Bills

Scrutinising role Question Time in Ho. L n Question time is briefer (30 mins. Scrutinising role Question Time in Ho. L n Question time is briefer (30 mins. Compared with 55 mins for Ministerial Questions) n Up to four ‘starred questions’ answered per day by one peer n

Deliberative role Whips are present but not adhered to as rigidly as in Ho. Deliberative role Whips are present but not adhered to as rigidly as in Ho. C n Quality of Ho. L debates is open to interpretation (click here for Adonis view) n

Legitimating role Ho. C is chief legitimating (approval giving) body because it is elected Legitimating role Ho. C is chief legitimating (approval giving) body because it is elected n Ho. L contributes to legitimating because it gives formal approval to Bills n

Judicial role Ho. L is the highest court of appeal n Law Lords (including Judicial role Ho. L is the highest court of appeal n Law Lords (including Lord Chancellor) are part of Ho. L n

Statutory instruments “In order to reduce unnecessary pressure on parliamentary time, primary legislation often Statutory instruments “In order to reduce unnecessary pressure on parliamentary time, primary legislation often gives ministers or other authorities the power to regulate administrative details by means of secondary or delegated legislation known as statutory instruments. These instruments are as much the law of the land as an Act of Parliament. There about 2, 000 statutory instruments each year” HMSO, 1994, pp. 77 -8

Starred questions are so-called because they appear on the order paper with an asterisk Starred questions are so-called because they appear on the order paper with an asterisk against them. They are asked in order to obtain specific information, and not with a view to making a speech or raising a debate, although supplementaries may be asked. In addition ‘unstarred’ (debatable) questions may be asked at the end of business on any day, when speeches may be made. HMSO, 1994, pp. 91 -2

Ho. L Debates – Adonis view “Lords debates may not entirely be without influence, Ho. L Debates – Adonis view “Lords debates may not entirely be without influence, but they rarely make an impact which is more than minor and indirect. ” Adonis, 1993, p. 216