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PRESENT AND FUTURE • Total horticulture area 5. 00 lakh ha. (10. 48% of PRESENT AND FUTURE • Total horticulture area 5. 00 lakh ha. (10. 48% of its net sown area). • Proposed total horticulture area up to 2014 -15 – 5. 83 lakh ha. (12. 23% of its net sown area). • Increase in horticulture area from 2009 -10 to 2014 -15 – 0. 83 lakh ha. • Percentage increase from 2009 -10 to 2014 -15 (16. 68%).

SWOT Analysis Strength – • Climatic condition favors growing frost resistant crops that are SWOT Analysis Strength – • Climatic condition favors growing frost resistant crops that are supplied as off-season crops to other states. • Traditionally farmers, especially tribals, are vegetable grower and collector of wild fruits that helps in easy transfer of technology and availability of skilled labours. • Good network of road and rail. • Demand-driven market at local as-well-as in other states due to increase purchasing power of people and rapid industrialization/urbanization in the state. • Existing network of departmental nurseries. • Convergence of MNREGS in the state for effective implementation of NHM.

Weakness – • Low and declining productivity. • Poor exposure of farmers and staff Weakness – • Low and declining productivity. • Poor exposure of farmers and staff to modern practices. • Open grazing practices for 8 months in the year causing damage to crops. • Net irrigated area is lower. • Lack of well trained extension person in the remote blocks. • Lack of infrastructure for processing, value addition and post harvest management. • Lack of organized market/Mandis at block level. • Lack of appropriate transport facilities.

Opportunities – • Presence of culturable fallow land 5. 13 lakh ha. • Scope Opportunities – • Presence of culturable fallow land 5. 13 lakh ha. • Scope for crop diversification from traditional paddy/coarse grain farming to horticulture. • Huge demand for off-season crops. • Presence of technical institutions like IGKVV, 18 - KVK, 17 - Horticulture Colleges may help in tapping modern knowledge in the field. • Processing of surplus produces for value addition. • Establishing network for organized agri-business through PPP.

Threat – • Excessive expansion of area without PHM may create de-motivation among farmers. Threat – • Excessive expansion of area without PHM may create de-motivation among farmers. • Absence of weather and disease forecasting mechanism will adversely effect crop protection. • Excessive withdrawal of ground water will lead to ecological imbalance. • Excessive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticide will cause decrease in productivity. • Lengthy procedure to access credit facilities from banks de-motivate the farmers.

USP of the state in term of horticulture • Production of off-season vegetables and USP of the state in term of horticulture • Production of off-season vegetables and fruits like Banana – Oct planting & Nov/Dec harvesting (5000 Mt. surplus), Papaya – Feb planting & Nov/Dec harvesting (55, 000 Mt. ), Brinjal – Jun planting & Sep/Nov harvesting (8000 Mt. ), Cauliflower - Jun planting & Sep/Nov harvesting (31, 500 Mt. ), Tomato - Jun planting & Sep/Nov harvesting (2, 11, 000 Mt. ), Kharif Potato (2, 27, 00 Mt. ), Okra – Feb planting & Apr/May harvesting (3000 Mt. ) and Chili – Jun planting & Oct/Nov harvesting (8000 Mt. ) can be further strengthened and developed due to favorable climatic condition. • Surplus of fruits and vegetables like Cashew-nut (5000 Mt. ), Mango (55, 000 Mt. ), Tomato (2, 000 Mt. ) and Chili (20, 000 Mt. ) can be used for processing, value addition and export.

 • Good network of department nurseries (111 with production capacity of 2. 50 • Good network of department nurseries (111 with production capacity of 2. 50 crore plants) that can be strengthened to produce quality planting material and reduce the demand supply gap (50% shortfall, especially due to TC Banana). • Good transport network to get access to in-land markets as-well-as exporting the products outside the state. • Convergence with MNREGS helps in effective implementation of NHM through providing protection, irrigation, maintenance etc. , to the plantation crops. • Locational advantage of sharing borders with state like Orissa, M. P. , A. P. , Maharastra and Jharkhand that have huge market demand for fruits and vegetables, can be en-cashed as a pull factor for promotion of horticulture.

SUPPLY CHAIN SUPPLY CHAIN

SUPPLY CHAIN SUPPLY CHAIN

Strategy – Key issues • • • Area, production and productivity has increased but Strategy – Key issues • • • Area, production and productivity has increased but due to lack of PHM practices there is considerable post harvest losses (25 -40%) and ultimately reduction in net return. Rate of area expansion may reduce due to problems in input supply like irrigation facilities and timely supply of quality planting material. No facility for proper collection and storage of surplus produce at farm-gate level as-well-as off-farm level and absence of organize market network from rural market to terminal market. Absence of forecasting facilities both in term of weather/ disease and price of products, it makes position of farmers vulnerable and increases the risk factor. Lack of exposure as-well-as orientation of both the farmers and departmental staff towards modern horticulture practices.

Strategy – Key Focus Areas • Increasing productivity and area of horticulture. • Reduce Strategy – Key Focus Areas • Increasing productivity and area of horticulture. • Reduce / minimize post harvest losses at farm-gate level. • Strengthening and consolidating organic cultivation and achieving organic certification. • Developing network of cold storages and cold chain. • Developing market infrastructure across the state, identify target consumers through market segmentation. • Developing new institutions like Grower Associations or Farmers Cooperative / Society, Common Enterprise Groups and strengthening the old ones like existing SHGs / WUAs / Micro Credit Groups for production, processing and marketing of the product.

Strategy – Implementation A. Increase in crop productivity – Ø Productivity is low and Strategy – Implementation A. Increase in crop productivity – Ø Productivity is low and declining – Ø Considerable gap in yield potential and average yield. This gap can be reduce through i. Creating assured irrigation facility – • • Cost effective with in-line drip system. Drip irrigation facility with multiple use of laterals as per crop option through crop planning. Exploring new and existing sources of surface water in the village like pond, tanks etc. De-silting and rejuvenation of existing canal systems of the state. To achieve this goal apart from support from NHM and MIS institutional linkage will be developed with irrigation department and convergence with MNREGS.

Yield Potential & Gap in Horticulture Crops in Mt. Yield Potential & Gap in Horticulture Crops in Mt.

ii. Ensuring Plant health to ensure effective protection of crops and efficient pest management ii. Ensuring Plant health to ensure effective protection of crops and efficient pest management through - • Setting up of disease forecasting units (8), bio-control labs (18) and plant health clinics (36) are required to reduce the risk of losses from pest and diseases. • Capacity building of farmers and staff in the field of IPM and aggressive campaigning in support of IPM. To achieve the goal along with inputs from NHM, institutional linkages will be developed with agriculture universities for research inputs, private research institutes and laboratories and KVKs for dissemination of information.

Ensuring Soil health for knowing status of macro & micro nutrient in the soil Ensuring Soil health for knowing status of macro & micro nutrient in the soil and their availability to the plant through - iii. • Setting up of leaf-tissue analysis lab (5) to identify the status of micro nutrients in the plant to know the nutritional status of the crop. • Soil testing of all the beneficiaries and preparation of soil health card for individual farmer. This will be helpful to identify the status of micronutrient and their appropriate requirement in the soil, that will help in crop planning, nutritional management and introduction of new crops. (In Dhamtari & Janjgir-Champa district process is complete with the help of RKVY but in NHM districts there is no such provision). To achieve the goal along with inputs from NHM, institutional linkages will be developed with soil testing labs of Agriculture department and University for soil testing and KVKs for dissemination of information.

Trends in yield for major horticulture crops Sl. Crops No Average Gains Yield potential Trends in yield for major horticulture crops Sl. Crops No Average Gains Yield potential of Yield National yield in Chhattisgarh Gap average 2004 -05 2008 -09 yield (SAU recommendation) 1 Mango 7. 45 3. 27 -4. 18 8. 00 4. 73 6. 30 2 Litchi 2. 28 1. 20 -1. 08 6. 00 4. 80 6. 00 3 Lime 6. 01 7. 06 1. 05 8. 00 0. 94 9. 00 4 Guava 7. 09 7. 94 0. 85 16. 00 8. 06 11. 10 5 Banana 7. 10 26. 51 19. 41 40. 00 13. 49 35. 90 6 Papaya 7. 09 18. 37 11. 28 50. 00 31. 63 33. 40 Cashew Custard 8 apple Jack 9 fruit 0. 42 1. 67 1. 25 2. 00 0. 33 0. 80 6. 96 2. 97 -3. 99 4. 00 1. 03 --- 6. 58 17. 50 10. 92 --- --- 10 11. 00 11. 16 0. 16 25. 00 13. 84 19. 90 7 Potato

Average Yield potential of Gains in yield Chhattisgarh yield (SAU recommendation) 2004 -05 2008 Average Yield potential of Gains in yield Chhattisgarh yield (SAU recommendation) 2004 -05 2008 -09 Sl. No Crops 11 Tomato 10. 14 10. 72 0. 58 12 Brinjal 11. 09 14. 66 11. 11 13 Cabbage Yield Gap National average 15. 00 4. 28 17. 90 3. 57 20. 00 5. 34 17. 00 15. 72 4. 61 25. 00 9. 28 22. 20 14 Cauli- flower 10. 60 15. 00 4. 40 20. 00 5. 00 18. 10 15 Okra 9. 95 8. 85 -1. 10 10. 00 1. 15 10. 30 16 Onion 10. 75 15. 77 5. 02 20. 00 4. 23 15. 10 17 Peas 7. 89 4. 50 -3. 39 --- 8. 20 18 Arbi 10. 85 13. 70 2. 85 --- --- 19 Chilli 5. 74 6. 00 0. 26 17. 50 11. 50 1. 60 20 Coriander 3. 33 2. 80 -0. 53 3. 00 0. 20 0. 60 21 13. 63 7. 80 -5. 83 20. 00 12. 20 3. 50 22 Turmeric 11. 25 7. 10 -4. 15 25. 00 17. 90 4. 60 23 7. 35 4. 50 -2. 85 7. 50 3. 00 4. 80 Ginger Garlic

B. Expansion of area – i. Shifting of focus from cultivating only high yielding B. Expansion of area – i. Shifting of focus from cultivating only high yielding variety to – • Introduce variety of crops with increased shelf-life and compatible for processing. • Increase disease resistance capacity of crops. To achieve the goal institutional linkages will be developed with Agriculture Universities to get research inputs.

ii. Crop diversification by shifting from coarse grain and paddy production to horticulture crops ii. Crop diversification by shifting from coarse grain and paddy production to horticulture crops through - • Crop planning. • Re-allocation of culturable fellow land (5. 13 lakh ha. ) and up-land under cereals (71, 500 ha. ). • Lowering of establishment (due to high labour input) and maintenance cost (especially due to open grazing system) of horticulture crop. To achieve the goal proper crop planning and appropriate subsidy for area expansion will be given from NHM. Institutional linkages will be developed with KVK for motivation of farmers.

iii. Preparation of Comprehensive Land Use Plan to introduce horticulture cultivation in • Culturable iii. Preparation of Comprehensive Land Use Plan to introduce horticulture cultivation in • Culturable fallow land (5, 13, 000 ha. ). • Marginal land & Common land (3, 44, 000 ha. ). • Land under miscellaneous tree crops (1000 ha. ) and old orchards on common land (3000 ha. ). To achieve the goal area identified for horticulture development shall be put before land use board and a comprehensive plan shall be made. Land identified for the horticulture shall not be diversified for the other purpose.

C. Organic Farming and Organic Certification – Chattisgarh is by-default practicing organic cultivation especially C. Organic Farming and Organic Certification – Chattisgarh is by-default practicing organic cultivation especially in the tribal belt, mainly due to the low paying capacity for modern agri-inputs of the farmers. Thus the state does not need to invest much for promotion of organic farming systems rather the need is – • To identify and develop a network of resource persons to integrate the modern technical knowledge of vermicomposting and Integrated Pest Management with the traditional knowledge base. • For promotion of organic cultivation in the state, it neither requires high capital inputs nor a paradigm shift from inorganic to organic practices but an intensive awareness and sensitization campaign through demonstration is needed.

Already existing organic practices in the state create a conducive environment to go for Already existing organic practices in the state create a conducive environment to go for organic certification of products. Therefore – • The state has already identified target species like Mango, Cashew nut, Lime, Banana, Papaya and Aloevera for organic certification (11, 000 ha. ). • The emphasis of the state will be on persuing different stages for certification through promotion of Good Agriculture Practices (GAP). To achieve the goal, along with inputs from NHM, institutional linkages will be developed with KVKs, NGOs and Training Organizations for capacity building and skill up-gradation and certification bodies like CGCERT. To institutilize organic certification system and setting-up of ICS help of NERAMC will be taken up.

D. Creating credit linkages ü In Chattisgarh a large proportion of farmers cultivate crops D. Creating credit linkages ü In Chattisgarh a large proportion of farmers cultivate crops like off-season vegetables and watermelon in the river beds (10, 000 ha. ) that come under common land. They could not avail loan facilities from the bank as they do not own the land have to take loan from the local money lenders with a high interest rate. On the other hand they face high risk of crop loss due to unpredictable flood but could not access the protection of loan waiver facilities provided by the government as they could not avail loan from the organized financial institutions. ü Most of the forms of the banks that needed to be filled up by the farmers are in English that creates a hindrance for dissemination of information. The selection criteria for getting the loan from the bank is also such that most of the farmers can not avail the facilities.

ü Distribution and reach of Kisan credit cards are also limited to the big ü Distribution and reach of Kisan credit cards are also limited to the big farmers. In most cases members of one big farmer’s family have got number of credit cards. Thus the benefits are not distributed equitably rather are limited to few even though the total number of credit cards distributed may be quite large. Thus - • It is required to take the landless, marginal and small farmers of the state in the fold of financial institutions like banks through creating awareness among the farmers about their entitlements, better coordination with banks and government agencies to reduce the cumbersome processing practices. To achieve the goal linkages will be developed with Lead Banks, nationalized banks, Rural Banks & Primary Agricultural Societies.

E. Production of planting material for assured supply of quality planting material through - E. Production of planting material for assured supply of quality planting material through - • Strengthening the existing nurseries, developing model nurseries (114), small nurseries (133 in private sector), setting up new Tissue Culture units (9) and Rehabilitation of existing TC (4). To achieve this goal financial assistance from NHM & RKVY and technical assistance from training institutions (for gardeners) and NERAMC will be taken.

F. Promotion of Horticulture Mechanization – To increase the efficiency and increase in productivity F. Promotion of Horticulture Mechanization – To increase the efficiency and increase in productivity promotion of horticulture mechanization will taken up in a big way through – • Introduction of small tractors (1645), rotavators (2200), levelers, power tillers, earth augers, seed drillers, ridge and furrow makers, reapers, power sprayers, tractor mount sprayers, power operated pruning saw/chain saw, weed/bush cutters (1760) and plastic crates, to help in increasing productivity. To achieve this goal financial assistance from NHM & RKVY and technical assistance from CG Seed Corporation Limited will be taken.

G. Proper Harvesting and Post Harvest Management of Crops – Shifting of focus from G. Proper Harvesting and Post Harvest Management of Crops – Shifting of focus from expansion of area to PHM, Marketing and Processing of the produce throughü The state has identified 96 potential production clusters and collection centers. The analysis has been made to identify the quantum of produces that needs to be stored. Based on the volume of produce further analysis is being made to design the storage facilities with requisite space. Based on the calculation establishment of 41 cold storages and 75 low cost onion storage is planned which are distributed across the state. • • To give access to the farmers in different agro-climatic zones. To reduce transportation cost and promote horticulture cultivation. ü Among the horticulture crops in the state Tomato (60, 000 Mt. ), Mango (55, 000 Mt. ) and Cashew-nut (4000 Mt. ) are identified as major target crops for further processing and value addition. The crops are identified based on their surplus production. • To make it economically viable for processing.

ü Based on the production and collection centers of horticulture products a market network ü Based on the production and collection centers of horticulture products a market network is planned. • To cater to the need of the farmers right from the village level to the terminal market. Focus is being made to develop a network of primary rural markets with appropriate infrastructure (113), whole sale market (13), terminal market (1) across the states to give benefit to the farmers just after the farm-gate level. • Analysis is made based on the crop wise production volume (8. 53 lakh Mt. vegetable and fruits) that can be marketed and designed. • Input support for marketing of the products by creating precooling units (18), zero energy based cool chamber (3155), low energy cool chambers (44), mobile pre-cooling unit (1), ripening chamber (16) and pack houses (848) for increasing the price premium of the crops.

ü It is planned to develop institution such as Growers Association at the village/cluster ü It is planned to develop institution such as Growers Association at the village/cluster of villages level who will purchase the products from the primary rural market/collection center/farm-gate and sell to the whole sale market. • Whole sale markets will be developed at the blocks/district level based on the potential of the crops. Growers association / farmers will get the opportunity to participate in the open auction to sell the products in the wholesale market. • The growers association / farmers will also get the opportunity to sell their products in the terminal market to be setup at Raipur. • During the planning attention has been given to ensure developing market facilities across the state so that farmers from all the districts get the opportunity to market their products with assured return. To achieve this goal linkage will be developed with CG Rajya Krishi Vipran Board (Mandi Borad) and financial assistance from NHM & RKVY will be taken. At head quarter level a marketing cell is also being established.

ü Establishment of network for disseminating real time information of product prices. A market ü Establishment of network for disseminating real time information of product prices. A market information system will be developed. Farmers can access the real time information related to product prices through the e-kiosks to be set at the primary rural market / wholesale market / terminal market level where information will be uploaded about the prices of the major mandis of the state as well as other cities of the country. The farmers can also get registered in the mobile phone network through which they will be receiving information in their mobile phone periodically. • This will help farmers gaining better bargaining power, price forecasting and planning for marketing their products. To achieve this goal linkages will be developed with ORG NIELSEN. The firm has already started the base work for collection of data related to production, processing and marketing of horticulture products from all the districts of the state.

ü Developing Management Information System (MIS) right from point of production to collection, storage, ü Developing Management Information System (MIS) right from point of production to collection, storage, processing and marketing at different levels using Geographic Information System (GIS). • To facilitate effective decision making both at the Mission Management Level and Farm Level. To achieve this goal linkages will be developed with the firms having experience of developing and implementing such programs in natural resource based activities.

Linkage of production clusters with PHM No. of Total Proposed cold chain unit with Linkage of production clusters with PHM No. of Total Proposed cold chain unit with location Proposed district production area expected & expenditure for each item like Cold processing Cluster (in ha. ) production Surplus storage, Pack houses, Refrigerated unit with available for Production vans, Packaging unit, Pre-cooling location, marketing available for units, Zero energy cool chamber, On- capacity & (Mt. ) cold chain/ farm collection & storage unit & other expenditure processing unit suitable to the cluster (Mt. ) 1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. i. 11 96 51726 852375 347120 Zero energy cool chamber (1 Mt. ) – 3155 ii. Low energy cool chambers (8 Mt. ) – 44 Tomato iii. Pack house – 848 pulp puri Processing iv. Pre-cooling unit – 18 unit- 3 Nos. v. Ripening chamber – 16 vi. Refrigerated van – 8 & vii. Mobile pre-cooling unit – 1 Cashew viii. CA cold storage – 5 Processing ix. Cold storage – 36 unit- 5 Nos. x. Big refrigerators – 0 xi. Refrigerated containers – 0 xii. Low cost onion storage – 75

Linkage of production clusters with markets No. of Total No. of district production collection Linkage of production clusters with markets No. of Total No. of district production collection area of existing proposed clusters centre crops nearest forwarding Primary Whole Terminal (a place (in ha. ) market Market/ Rural Market & Market with from linkage Terminal Market & Expenditure where (Haat/ Market Exp. (Rs. in produce is Bazar) (Rs. in Lakh) collected Lakh) & directly goes to various markets) 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11 96 80 51726 209 57 113. 00 ---

H. Human Resource Development – ü It is very important to build the capacity H. Human Resource Development – ü It is very important to build the capacity of both the farmers and the staff on issues related to production, harvesting, post harvest management of products on the one hand soft skills and managerial skills like inter-personal communication, leadership, institution building, group management and financial management on the other. It is extremely important to build efficient resource persons from within the department and also from among the farmers who can act as peer educators and change agents to implement the program especially adoption of new practices / technology. Capacity building programs are designed in the following model – • Training Need Assessment (TNA) – § • Training will not be uniform in nature rather modules will be developed based on training need assessment of the stakeholders keeping in mind the project objectives, project deliverables and existing gaps in performance. For the farmers – § § Issue based in situ training within the district for a batch of 50 farmers per training. Exposure visits/study tours within the district, within the state, outside the state

 • For the Technical Staff / Field Functionaries • • For the Supervisors • For the Technical Staff / Field Functionaries • • For the Supervisors and Entrepreneurs • • • Refreshers course at the district level Training of Trainers for selected officials at the state level Resource Person Development program with study tour outside the state. Training of supervisors on project management and project monitoring. Training of Entrepreneurs from among the progressive farmers on entrepreneurship development, modern techniques of agri-business. For the Gardeners • Training on garden management and rejuvenation of senile orchards. To achieve this goal help of the prestigious training institutes will be taken. Such type of Capacity Building Interventions in the form of training is already going on in the state.

Schedule of training activities - Pert Phase - I Sl. No Training Activities 1. Schedule of training activities - Pert Phase - I Sl. No Training Activities 1. Training for farmers & PRI in the state 2. Training for farmers & PRI outside the state 3. Training of Trainers 4. Resource persons development program 5. Project Management for mission staff 6. Refreshers course for senior level officials 7. Refreshers course for extension officers Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

Schedule of training activities - Pert Phase - II Sl. No. Training Activities 1. Schedule of training activities - Pert Phase - II Sl. No. Training Activities 1. Training for farmers & PRI in the state. 2. Training for farmers & PRI outside the state. 3. 4. 5. 6. Training of Trainers. Project Management for mission staff. Refreshers course for extension officers. Certificate course to develop para professionals. Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

Schedule of training activities - Pert Sl. No Training Activities 1. Training for farmers Schedule of training activities - Pert Sl. No Training Activities 1. Training for farmers & PRI in the state 2. Training for farmers & PRI outside the state 3. 4. 5. Project Management for mission staff Refreshers course for extension officers Certificate course to develop para professionals Phase - III Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb

Change in cropping pattern Observation – – Overall food grain sector has experienced a Change in cropping pattern Observation – – Overall food grain sector has experienced a decline in area of paddy (-8. 45%) and coarse cereals (-63. 18%) in last 5 years. This shift is in area from food grains is towards fruits (181%), vegetables (137%), spices (119%) and oil seeds (112%). – The gain in horticulture area is a collective impact of diversification of production pattern of farmers and increase demand of consumers due to shift in their consumption pattern. Sl. No. Crop 2004 -05 2008 -09 % age increase in the area during last 5 years 1. Paddy 39, 43, 800 36, 10, 470 -8. 45 2. Wheat 99, 200 1, 65, 120 66. 45 5. Oilseeds 2, 89, 400 6, 14, 040 112. 17 7. Coarse cereals 1, 94, 200 71, 500 -63. 18 8. Fruits 46, 247 1, 30, 098 181. 31 9. Vegetables 1, 23, 491 2, 93, 764 137. 88 10. Spices 28, 399 62, 391 119. 69 11. Flowers 1508 2390 58. 48

Feasibility of shift towards horticulture Observation – – – – Cost-benefit ratio of horticulture Feasibility of shift towards horticulture Observation – – – – Cost-benefit ratio of horticulture is more than CBR of cereals. Thus it is more profitable for farmers to diversify towards fruit and vegetable cultivation then cereals, especially paddy and coarse grain. Issue of diversification is needed to meet the increasing domestic demand of fruit and vegetables beside the improving income. Share of Mango in total fruit area change is about 27% and it is the only crop which is grown across the all agro-climatic zones. Cashew-nut (19%), Banana (10%), Guava (13%), Lime (7%), Papaya (7%) and vegetable Tomato (22%), Brinjal, Okra and Cauliflower (15% each) among spices Chili (38%), Coriander (22%), Turmeric (16%) and Ginger (18%) have seen major changes in the area in last 10 years. Due to shorter duration of winter period Banana and Papaya are grown and supplied to other states, for whom these are off-season crops. Kharif Potato is fast emerging crop, major portion of which is exported outside of the state.

Change in Area under Major Horticulture crop (in ha. ) Sl. No. Crops 1. Change in Area under Major Horticulture crop (in ha. ) Sl. No. Crops 1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2. Mango Cashew Banana Guava Lime Papaya Jack Fruits Custerd Apple Litchi Total Fruits 1 Turmeric 2 Ginger 3 Chilli 4 Coriander 5 Garlic Total Spices - %age Increase in Area Total Area up Change in during 2000 -2004 during 2005 -2009 during 2000 -2009 to 2008 -09 area 3. 481 77 215 2165 235 144 353 496 1241 5407 454 1269 4740 3408 386 4. 18156 13443 6652 7173 5127 4653 4625 2000 1345 63174 5159 4901 8026 4121 1045 5. 18637 13520 6867 9338 5362 4797 4978 2496 2586 68581 5613 6170 12766 7529 1431 6. 37288 17712 9292 10814 7254 8063 5408 3635 1782 101248 5522 7411 18318 9187 3343 7. 27. 18 19. 71 10. 01 13. 62 7. 82 6. 99 7. 26 3. 64 3. 77 100. 00 16. 75 18. 41 38. 10 22. 47 4. 27 10257 23252 33509 43781 100. 00

Change in Area under Major Horticulture crop (in ha. ) Sl. No. Crops 1 Change in Area under Major Horticulture crop (in ha. ) Sl. No. Crops 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 Tomato Brinjal Cauliflower Okra Cabbage Potato Onion Arbi Peas Total Vegetable 1 2 Merigold Tube Rose Chrysanthemu 3 m 4 Gladiouls 5 Rose Total Flowers - %age Increase in Area Total Area up Change in during 2000 -2004 during 2005 -2009 during 2000 -2009 to 2008 -09 area 3 4 5 6 7 4737 18520 23257 39213 22. 72 1440 13084 14524 24249 14. 19 669 12258 12927 16095 12. 63 2204 13194 15398 23452 15. 04 468 8971 9439 13597 9. 22 2832 10203 13035 32126 12. 73 693 4871 5564 8777 5. 43 536 4529 5065 7247 4. 95 540 2636 3176 10266 3. 10 14119 88266 102385 175022 100. 00 90 20 394 94 484 114 889 151 60. 80 14. 32 0 65 65 142 8. 17 30 20 160 48 35 636 78 55 796 51 546 1779 9. 80 6. 91 100. 00

Production trend of horticulture crop Production trend of horticulture crop

Area expansion trend of horticulture crop Area expansion trend of horticulture crop

Area & Production of horticulture crop (Area in lakh ha. /Production in Mt. ) Area & Production of horticulture crop (Area in lakh ha. /Production in Mt. ) 2004 -05 Crops 2005 -06 2006 -07 2007 -08 2008 -09 Area Prod. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Fruits 0. 46 3. 24 0. 75 6. 43 1. 00 6. 81 1. 25 9. 32 1. 30 9. 78 Veg. 1. 23 12. 50 1. 96 24. 32 2. 36 23. 40 2. 93 29. 25 2. 94 29. 04 Spices 0. 28 1. 70 0. 29 1. 68 0. 41 1. 99 0. 54 2. 89 0. 62 4. 26 Aromatic 0. 02 0. 11 0. 02 0. 10 0. 59 0. 12 0. 66 Flowers 0. 02 0. 03 0. 02 0. 04 0. 02 0. 07 Total - 2. 02 17. 57 3. 04 32. 58 3. 89 32. 82 4. 85 42. 18 5. 00 43. 81

Production trend of Horticulture Observation – – Area of fruit and vegetable is increased Production trend of Horticulture Observation – – Area of fruit and vegetable is increased sharply from 2005 -06 to 2007 -08 but now it is static. – Production of fruits grew at the rate of 40% initially but later production has declining due to the fact that new orchards are in their gestation period and old orchards are becoming senile. – The productivity of all major horticulture crops except Okra, Coriander, Cashew-nut, Lime and Banana, is lower than its potential. – Although productivity is increasing but still far below than the expected yield potential. In Mango (-4. 1 Mt. /ha. ), Litchi (-1. 08 Mt. /ha. ), Custard apple (-3. 99 Mt. /ha. ), Okra (-1. 1 Mt. /ha. ), Ginger (-5. 8 Mt. /ha. ) and Turmeric (-4. 1 Mt. /ha. ) have shown decline in yield in last 5 years.

Domestic demand & Supply (Unit – in Kg. person per annum) Per capita consumption Domestic demand & Supply (Unit – in Kg. person per annum) Per capita consumption (200809) - in Kg. /person/ annum Fruit Vegetable 11 60 Total production (2008 -09) – in lakh Mt. Total demand (200809) – in lakh Mt. * Fruit Vegetable 9. 78 29. 04 2. 20 12. 00 Per capita demand (2020) – in Kg. /person /annum ** & *** Fruit Vegetable 17 95 Total production (2020) – in lakh Mt. **** Fruit Vegetable 13. 9 41. 34 (Source – National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) collects data on house hold consumption by sample survey techniques. This study uses data from consumer expenditure survey of National Sample Survey (NSS) of rounds number 55 pertaining to year 1999 -2000). * Demand projection is made on assumptions about populations, urbanization, povery and economic growth per capita demand. ** Future population growth will follow the past population growth trend and urban population proportion in total population will also follow past trends. *** 8% GDP growth rate per year is assumed. **** Future production of horticulture crop will follow the current trend of 3% growth per annum. Observation Chhattisgarh in-spite of being one of the largest producers of vegetables and spices does not have much export volume because of huge domestic demand. Besides this there are supply constraints and huge post harvest losses which lead to lower net availability of produces.

Supply chain from farm-gate to market 2008 -09 Commodity Total annual production Post harvest Supply chain from farm-gate to market 2008 -09 Commodity Total annual production Post harvest losses 1. 2. 3. Total annual consumption within the state (raw form) 4. Fruit 9. 78 3. 91 Vegetables 29. 04 11. 61 (Unit – in. Lakh Mt. ) Raw material used for processing Total surplus for export to other states Total import from other states 5. 6. 7. 2. 20 0. 60 * 1. 07 *** 1. 10 12. 00 1. 00 ** 6. 43 **** 1. 25 ***** (Source – National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) collects data on house hold consumption by sample survey techniques. This study uses data from consumer expenditure survey of National Sample Survey (NSS) of rounds number 55 pertaining to year 1999 -2000). * Mango is the main crop used for processing Amchoor and Pickle. ** Tomato is the main crop used for processing Ketchup and Purie. *** Papaya, Cashew-nut, Banana and Mango are the main crops exported to other states. **** Tomato, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Kharif Potato, Brinjal, Okra, are the main crops exported to other states. ***** Potato, Onion and Garlic are mojor crops imported from other states. Observation The annual per capita consumption of vegetable has increased. The increase in consumption levels of vegetable and fruits has been quite similar in both the rural and urban areas.

Supply chain from farm-gate to market 2008 -09 (in Lakh Mt. ) Supply chain from farm-gate to market 2008 -09 (in Lakh Mt. )

Issues in PHM – Lack of awareness among farmers in the field of PHM. Issues in PHM – Lack of awareness among farmers in the field of PHM. Department is also not properly equipped with knowledge / resources to motivate farmers. – Capital intensive activity, it requires huge capital investment and technical know-how to establish entire cold-chain. – To make PHM successful activity about 300 -400. 00 crore rupees are required within 5 years. Neither the farmers nor the entrepreneurs of Chhattisgarh are financially capable of investing this huge capital amount. Therefore intervention from government is required. – Subsidy given for PHM and marketing is not attractive and lucrative. Provision of credit linked back ended subsidy is major de-motivating factor for availing subsidy.

Issues in PHM – At present horticulture is a individual activity, there is no Issues in PHM – At present horticulture is a individual activity, there is no system of group farming or contract farming. Since entire cold chain management requires sufficient quantity of raw material to operate it efficiently and optimally. For bulk production, compact production cluster of particular produce is required. – For processing, round the year availability of raw material is essential to make it viable. To ensure availability of raw material during off-season safe storage of raw material in the glut season is required. – In marketing sector private entrepreneurs are not coming forward due to various reason like capital investment APMC Act, geographical remoteness and mind set and barnding.

Issues in Marketing – APMC Act prohibits transaction outside the regulated mandis and does Issues in Marketing – APMC Act prohibits transaction outside the regulated mandis and does not allow direct marketing and direct procurement of agriculture produce from farmers fields. APMC implementation restricts the setting up of markets other than by the state government. This restricts the scope for corporate houses venturing into horticulture sector. – In absence of institutions like Grower Associations, Farmers Cooperative/Society, Common Enterprise Group, Contract Farming etc. , marketing sector is unable to organize and strengthen. – Single gateway to regulated market would save time and improve efficiency.

Issues in Marketing – Participation of private sector to contract farming and leasing arrangements Issues in Marketing – Participation of private sector to contract farming and leasing arrangements will allow accelerated technology transfer, capital flow and assured market for horticulture. – Food processing industry on part of private sector should be simplified and encouraged, therefore backward linkages of horticulture crop can be developed. – Most of the produce is directly procure from the field of big farmers by commission agents / middle man from outside the state. – Small farmers are depend on village merchants or on nearby rural markets to lift their surplus produce. Infrastructure development at all the tires of market is essential to organize small farmers having no bargaining power, quality incentive and share in final consumer price. – Vertical coordination of farmers with cooperatives / societies, contract farming and retail chain would facilitate them to deliver better output due to lower risk, better infrastructure, better price and created awareness to prevailing technology.

Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Sl. No. Fruit crop Target No. of Total no. Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Sl. No. Fruit crop Target No. of Total no. of (in ha. ) plants per ha. plants required 1. Mango 1600 100 2. Litchi 700 3. Lime 4. Procurement Self Out sourcing 160000 - 150 105000 54113 50887 600 277 166200 - Aonla 500 100 50000 - 50000 5. Guava 950 277 263150 95000 168150 6. Custard apple 200 100 20000 - 20000 7. Nashpati(Pear) 100 27700 - 8. Sweet Lime 200 277 55400 - 55400 9. Banana (TC) 1250 2500 3125000 - 3125000 10. Papaya 450 2500 1125000 - 11. Cashewnut 130000 - 130000 Total 7850 - 5227450 1628013 3599437

Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Sl. Spices crop No. Procurement Target (in ha. ) Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Sl. Spices crop No. Procurement Target (in ha. ) Seed rate per ha. (in Kg. ) Total Seed Requirement (in Kg. ) Self Out sourcing 1. Garlic 300 500 150000 - 150000 2. Chilli 4000 0. 30 1200 - 1200 3. Coriander 2100 20 42000 - 42000 4. Methi 400 8 3200 - 3200 5. Ginger 2500 6250000 - 6250000 6. Turmeric 1500 2500 3750000 - 3750000 Total 10800 10196400 - 10196400

Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Total Plant/Seed/ Bulb Requirement Procurement Sl. No. Flower crop Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Total Plant/Seed/ Bulb Requirement Procurement Sl. No. Flower crop Target (in ha. ) Plant/Seed/ Bulb rate per ha. 1. Rose 200 18000 (Nos. ) 3600000 (Nos. ) - 3600000 (Nos. ) 2. Gerbera 150 83000 (Nos. ) 12450000 (Nos. ) - 12450000 (Nos. ) 3. Rajnigandha 600 45000 (Nos. ) 27000000 (Nos. ) - 27000000 (Nos. ) 4. Gladiolus 1150 45000 (Nos. ) 51750000 (Nos. ) - 51750000 (Nos. ) 5. Marigold 600 0. 6 (Kg. ) 360(Kg. ) - 360(Kg. ) 6. Chrysanthemum 50 0. 8 (Kg. ) 40(Kg. ) - 40(Kg. ) 7. Galardia 200 1 (Kg. ) 200(Kg. ) - 200(Kg. ) 2950 - - Total Self Out sourcing

Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Total Sl. Target Plant/Seed/ Aromatic crop No in ha. Planting material sub-plan 2010 -11 Total Sl. Target Plant/Seed/ Aromatic crop No in ha. Slips per ha. Bulb Requirement Procurement Self Out sourcing 1. E. Citridora 1050 1500 (Nos. ) 1575000 - 1575000 2. Pamaroza 200 6. 25 (Kg. ) 1250 - 1250 3. Vetiver 300 25000 (Slips) 7500000 - 7500000 4. Lemongrass 950 20000 (Slips) 19000000 - 19000000 2500 - - Total

Impact of NHM Sl. No. 1. 1. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. No. of (Production Impact of NHM Sl. No. 1. 1. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. No. of (Production Activity Unit Impact Increase in lakhs) Beneficiaries in Mt. ) 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Establishment of New Gardens 1. Fallow land brought under cultivation. A. Perennial crops - 2. Employment generation at rural a. Mango Ha. 15342 1725. 9 level. b. Litchi Ha. 3614 406. 57 3. Support to eco-system through c. Lime Ha. 3310 372. 37 plantation. 34652 4. Although fruit orchards are in d. Aonla Ha. 1036 66. 09 gestation period but initiation of e. Custard Ha. 1676 188. 55 flowering and fruiting develop Apple confidence in beneficiaries & encourage other farmers for area f. Cashew Ha. 11676 656. 77 expansion. B. Annual Crops - 1. Returns from Banana is very high. 2. Farmers are getting 30 to 35 Mt. average yield per ha. 3. Banana is exported to the other states from Chhattisgarh. 1445 Banana Ha. 3395 509. 25 135800 4. Whole sale traders from Delhi, UP. are purchasing farmers produce from farm gate. Farmers need not to pay charges of harvesting, packing & transport to market.

Impact of NHM Sl. No. Activity 1. 2. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. (Production Unit Impact of NHM Sl. No. Activity 1. 2. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. (Production Unit Increase in lakhs) in Mt. ) 3. 4. 5. 6. a. Chili Ha. 24360 2740. 50 Ha. 500 56. 25 7790 c. Coriander Ha. 1700 191. 25 4760 d. Turmeric Ha. 3600 405. 00 25200 e. Ginger Ha. 3400 382. 50 26520 No. of Beneficiaries 7. 8. 146160 b. Onion Impact Spices crops - 1. Under Spices Chilli has become main crop and it occupies highest position both in area & production. 2. Due to cluster approach larger area of spices developed in a cluster which increased the bargaining power & also facilitate the farmers to send their produce 35560 to distant markets where they fetched good prices. 3. Farmers are now inclined to grow these crops in larger area at their own cost. 4. Chili is exported to the adjoining states from Chhattisgarh.

Impact of NHM Sl. No. 1. 3. 4. 5. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. No. Impact of NHM Sl. No. 1. 3. 4. 5. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. No. of (Production in Activity Unit Impact Increase in lakhs) Beneficiaries Mt. ) 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Floriculture crops - 20 to 25 lakhs 1. Production of Cut flowers of a. Rose Ha. 250 87. 50 cut flower Roses, Gerbera, Tuberose & 0. 75 to 0. 80 Gladiolus in the field of local lakhs cut b. Gerbera Ha. 141 49. 35 farmers fulfilling the local flower need of the state & also 55 to 60 lakhs increased their income & 5457 cut flower c. Tuberose Ha. 1000 450. 00 open a new area of cultivation. initially. 2. Farmers are also exporting 125 lakh sticks the cut flowers to adjacent d. Gladiolus Ha. 600 270. 00 approx. markets like Nagpur, e. Marigold Ha. 1088 130. 56 13050 approx. Culcutta out of state. f. Chrysanthemum Ha. 150 18. 00 450 approx. 1. About 10800 ha. area is brought under irrigation Community through bore-wells. Nos. 4329 2745. 15 --17316 Bore-wells 2. Productivity of crops increased due to assured irrigation. Farmers are motivated to use traditional old techniques for Organic Farming Ha. 4890 488. 99 --4751 production of crops. Process of certification of the produce is in progress.

Impact of NHM Sl. No. Activity 1. 6. 2. b. Portable HDPE unit 8. Impact of NHM Sl. No. Activity 1. 6. 2. b. Portable HDPE unit 8. Impact No. of Beneficiaries 7. 8. Vermi compost units - a. Pucca Tanka 7. Output Phy. Exp. (Rs. (Production in Unit Increase in lakhs) Mt. ) 3. 4. 5. 6. Nos. Ha. Establishment of Nos. Model Nurseries HRD Nos. 2250 12600 1. Use of vermi compost is 675. 00 33. 75 lakh CFT. improving soil health and increasing production. 2. Cost of cultivation is also reduced due to less use of chemical fertilizer. 3779. 70 36. 28 lakh CFT. 3. Farmers are also using vermi wash as growth hormones. 58 1051. 84 1. Plant production capacity of departmental nurseries is increased. 2. 14. 24 lakhs plants produced in the year 2008 -09 in model 58 nurseries of NHM. 46, 927 898. 81 Training & exposure visits of the farmers have been done. 9230 46, 927

Action Plan 2010 -11 Action Plan 2010 -11

Propsals by SAU. Propsals by SAU.

Road Map from 2010 -11 to 2014 -15 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 Road Map from 2010 -11 to 2014 -15 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. A. Plantation Infrastructure & Devlopment i) Model Nursery (No. ) (a) Model Nursery (Public Sector) 20 500. 00 21 515. 00 23 575. 00 25 625. 00 114 2840. 00 (b) Model Nursery (Private Sector) 7 87. 50 9 112. 50 11 137. 50 13 162. 50 15 187. 50 55 687. 50 20 62. 50 25 78. 13 28 87. 50 30 93. 75 133 415. 63 ii) Small Nursery (No. ) Small Nursery (Private Sector) iii) Rehabilitation of existing Tissue Culture (TC) units (No. ) Private Sector 1 7. 50 0. 00 1 7. 50 4 30. 00 iv) Setting up of new TC units - 0. 00 0 0. 00 (a) Public Sector. 1 100. 00 4 400. 00 (b) Private Sector 1 50. 00 5 250. 00 50 807. 50 58 863. 13 64 950. 00 70 938. 75 73 1063. 75 315 4623. 13 Total

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 1 i) Seed production and distribution for Vegetables (Ha. ) (a) Public sector 51 25. 50 55 27. 50 60 30. 00 286 143. 00 (b) Private sector 50 12. 50 60 15. 00 75 18. 75 100 25. 00 385 96. 25 (C) Seed Infrastructure (Public Sector) 0 0. 00 1 0. 17 4 0. 67 (a) Seed Infrastructure (Public Sector). 2 400. 00 1 200. 00 5 1000. 00 (b) Seed Infrastructure (Private Sector) 1 100. 00 5 500. 00 104 538. 00 118 342. 67 138 348. 92 163 355. 17 162 155. 17 685 1739. 92 ii) Seed Infrastructure Total 2 Establishment of New Gardens (Area Expansion) (Ha. ) - I. Fruits (Non Perenial)i) Banana (TC) (@50% subsidy) 1250 625. 00 1300 650. 00 1400 700. 00 1450 725. 00 1500 750. 00 6900 3450. 00 ii) Papaya (@50% subsidy) 550 275. 00 600 300. 00 650 325. 00 700 350. 00 750 375. 00 3250 1625. 00 Fruits (Perenial) - 60% subsidy 1 st year 4850 803. 73 5150 854. 21 5425 901. 41 5675 943. 60 5550 924. 11 26650 4427. 07 Fruits (Perenial)- 20% subsidy 2 ndyear 3695 230. 85 2520 162. 54 2800 181. 16 2940 190. 47 2940 190. 96 14895 955. 98 Fruits (Perenial)- 20% subsidy 3 rd year. 520 32. 80 2520 162. 54 2800 181. 16 2940 190. 47 2940 190. 96 11720 757. 93

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. II. Fin. Tar Mushrooms (No. ) (a) Spawn making unit - i) Public Sector 2 30. 00 3 45. 00 2 30. 00 12 180. 00 ii) Private Sector (@50% subsidy). 2 15. 00 3 22. 50 2 15. 00 12 90. 00 (b) Compost making unit i) Public Sector 2 40. 00 3 60. 00 2 40. 00 12 240. 00 ii) Private Sector (@50% subsidy). 1 10. 00 3 30. 00 2 20. 00 11 110. 00 7 95 12 157. 50 8 105. 00 47 620. 00 (a) Cut Flowers 350 122. 50 450 157. 50 550 192. 50 650 227. 50 550 192. 50 2550 892. 50 (b) Bulbulous Flowers 1750 787. 50 1850 832. 50 1950 877. 50 2000 900. 00 1900 855. 00 9450 4253 (c) Loose Flowers 850 102. 00 975 117. 00 1100 132. 00 1225 147. 00 1100 132. 00 5250 630. 00 Total III. Flowers (Ha. ) -

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No. Programme 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No. Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. IV. Spices (Ha. ) 10800 1350. 00 11400 1425. 00 12000 1500. 00 12700 1587. 50 13000 1625. 00 59900 7487. 50 V. Aromatic Plants (Ha. ) 2500 312. 50 2700 337. 50 2950 368. 75 3150 393. 75 3300 412. 50 14600 1825. 00 VI. Plantation crops (Ha. ) - - 60% subsidy in 1 st year. 1300 156. 00 1400 168. 00 1500 180. 00 1600 192. 00 7400 888. 00 - 20% subsidy in 2 ndyear. 1840 73. 60 1120 44. 80 1200 48. 00 1280 51. 20 6720 268. 80 - 20% subsidy in 3 rd year. 740 29. 60 1120 44. 80 1200 48. 00 1280 51. 20 5620 224. 80 3880 259. 20 3640 257. 60 3900 276. 00 4160 294. 40 19740 1381. 60 600 90. 00 650 97. 50 700 105. 00 750 112. 50 700 105. 00 3400 510. 00 Total 3 4 Rejuvenation of Old Orchards (Ha. ) Creation of water resources (No. ) i) Community tanks/on farm ponds 112 1680. 00 150 2250. 00 200 3000. 00 250 3750. 00 962 14430. 00 ii) Water harvesting system for individuals 480 288. 00 500 300. 00 550 330. 00 600 360. 00 2730 1638. 00 iii) Borewells 1500 1050. 00 1600 1120. 00 1650 1155. 00 1700 1190. 00 1800 1260. 00 8250 5775. 00 Total 2092 3018. 00 2250 3670. 00 2400 4485. 00 2550 5300. 00 2650 5370. 00 11942 21843. 00

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No Programme 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. T ar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 69 154. 10 85 205. 19 110 275. 38 140 347. 44 145 353. 88 549 1335. 98 2. Plastic Mulching 1750 175. 00 200. 00 225. 00 2500 250. 00 1100. 00 3. Shade Net House 305 419. 35 375 523. 00 460 684. 60 575 855. 75 2290 3338. 45 4. Plastic Tunnels 170 25. 50 200 30. 00 250 37. 50 300 45. 00 1220 183. 00 5. Anti Bird/Anti Hail Nets 70 35. 00 100 50. 00 125 62. 50 150 75. 00 595 297. 50 6. Cost of planting material of high value vegetables grown in poly house 45 11. 81 50 13. 13 75 19. 69 100 26. 25 150 39. 38 420 110. 25 7. Cost of planting material of flowers for poly house 27 33. 75 35 43. 75 50 62. 50 75 93. 75 100 125. 00 287 358. 75 2436 854. 51 2845 1065. 06 3320 1367. 16 3840 1693. 18 3920 1744. 00 16361 6723. 92 5 Protected Cultivation (No. ) 1. Green House Structure Total

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 6 Promotion of Integrated Nutrient Management (INM) / Integrated Pest Management (IPM) i) Sanitary and Phytosanitary infrastructure (Public Sector) (No. . ) 1 100. 00 2 200. 00 57. 00 60. 00 65. 00 7000 70. 00 322. 00 3 12. 00 2 8. 00 1 4. 00 0. 00 8 32. 00 (a) Public Sector 3 240. 00 2 160. 00 11 880. 00 (b) Private Sector 1 40. 00 2 80. 00 7 280. 00 ii) Promotion IPM/INM (Ha. ) of iii) Disease forecasting unit (Public Sector) (No. ) iv) Bio Control Lab (No. )- v) Plant Health Clinic (No. )(a) Public Sector 4 80. 00 5 100. 00 6 120. 00 25 500. 00 (b) Private Sector 1 10. 00 3 30. 00 2 20. 00 11 110. 00 vi) Leaf / Tissue Analysis Lab -Public Sector (No. ) 1 20. 00 5 100. 00 559. 00 458. 00 563. 00 454. 00 390. 00 2424. 00 Total

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 7 Organic Farming (Ha. ) (a) Adoption of organic farming i) 40% subsidy in 1 st year. 1750 70. 00 2000 80. 00 2250 90. 00 2500 100. 00 11000 440. 00 ii) 30% subsidy in 2 nd year. 650 19. 50 2000 60. 00 2250 67. 50 2500 75. 00 9900 297. 00 iii) 30% subsidy in 3 rd year. 0 0. 00 2000 60. 00 2250 67. 50 2500 75. 00 9250 277. 50 (b) Organic Certification i) 30% subsidy in 1 st year 35 52. 50 40 60. 00 45 67. 50 50 75. 00 220 330. 00 ii) 30% subsidy in 2 nd year. 13 19. 50 40 60. 00 45 67. 50 50 75. 00 198 297. 00 iii) 40% subsidy in 3 rd year. 0 0. 00 40 80. 00 45 90. 00 50 100. 00 185 370. 00 (c) Vermi compost units/organic input production unit (No. ) i) Permanent structure ii)HDPE Vermibed Total 650 195. 00 700 210. 00 750 225. 00 800 240. 00 3700 1110. 00 20000 1000. 00 22000 1100. 00 24000 1200. 00 25000 1250. 00 116000 5800. 00 1356. 50 1710. 00 1875. 00 1990. 00 8921. 50

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No Programme 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl. No Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 1 10. 00 2 20. 00 5 50. 00 7 70. 00 20 200. 00 Honey bee colony (No. ) 3050 21. 35 3200 22. 40 3500 24. 50 4000 28. 00 5000 35. 00 18750 131. 25 Hives (No. ) 3050 24. 40 3200 25. 60 3500 28. 00 4000 32. 00 5000 40. 00 18750 150. 00 Equipment including honey extractor (No. ) 274 19. 18 300 21. 00 350 24. 50 400 28. 00 500 35. 00 1824 127. 68 74. 93 89. 00 127. 00 138. 00 180. 00 608. 93 8 Pollination support- beekeeping Production of nucleus stock Public Sector Total 9 Horticulture Mechanization(No. ) 880 660. 50 1000 742. 50 1125 818. 75 1250 895. 00 1350 978. 75 5605 4095. 50 10 Tech. dissemination public sector(No. ) 7 175. 00 10 250. 00 12 300. 00 11 275. 00 50 1250. 00 11 Human Resource Development (HRD) (No. )(a) HRD for Supervisors & Entrepreneurs. 1 20. 00 2 40. 00 1 20. 00 8 160. 00 (b) HRD for Gardeners. 1 15. 00 2 30. 00 1 15. 00 8 120. 00 (c) Training of Farmers 10800 208. 85 11400 228. 50 11950 253. 35 12800 293. 00 13500 306. 00 60450 1289. 70 (e) Expousre visit of farmers 10825 167. 50 11430 192. 25 11985 221. 25 12840 258. 90 13550 293. 75 60630 1133. 65 467 70. 94 565 89. 00 645 115. 84 725 142. 68 830 170. 65 3232 589. 10 (f) Training/Study Tour

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. B Integrated Post Harvest Management (No. ) i) Pack house 305 457. 50 150 225. 00 93 139. 50 848 1272. 00 ii) Pre-cooling unit 4 28. 5 2 12 3 18 5 30 4 24 18 112. 5 iii) Mobile pre-cooling unit 1 9. 60 0. 00 1 9. 60 iv) Cold storage units 13 1605. 00 5 600. 00 8 960. 00 7 840. 00 3 360. 00 36 4365. 00 v) Processing units 3 22. 00 2 14. 00 1 6. 00 8 54. 00 v) C. A/M. A. Storage units 0 0. 00 1 640. 00 2 1280. 00 1 640. 00 5 3200. 00 vi) Refer vans/Containers 3 28. 80 2 19. 20 1 9. 60 0. 00 8 76. 80 viii) Ripening chamber 1 120. 00 6 765. 00 5 600. 00 2 240. 00 16 1965. 00 ix) Evaporative / low energy cool chamber 11 22. 00 15 30. 00 10 20. 00 5 10. 00 3 6. 00 44 88. 00 xi) Low cost onion storage structure 50 27. 50 10 5. 50 5 2. 75 0. 00 75 41. 25 xii) Pusa Zero energy cool chamber 1300 28. 60 500 11. 00 700 15. 40 155 3. 41 3155 69. 41 1691 2349. 50 693 2321. 70 690 2504. 70 878 2658. 75 262 1418. 91 4214 11253. 56 Total

2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. 2010 -11 2011 -12 2012 -13 2013 -14 2014 -15 Total Sl Programme Phy. Tar Fin. Tar 1 2 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 C Establishment of Marketing Infrastructure for Horticultural Produce (No. )i) Terminal markets 0 0. 00 1 60. 00 ii) Wholesale markets - 3 75. 00 1 25. 00 13 325. 00 iii) Rural Markets/Apni Mandies/ Direct Markets - 56 454. 00 17 145. 00 14 121. 00 13 110. 00 113 940. 00 iv) Retail Markets / Outlets (environmentally controlled) - 1 5. 50 5 20. 00 10 40. 00 20 80. 00 50 200. 00 86 345. 50 viii) Market extension activities 2 6. 00 3 9. 00 5 15. 00 2 6. 00 17 51. 00 540. 50 309. 00 251. 00 280. 00 341. 00 1721. 50 State /Dist. level Insti. Strengthning 715. 12 750. 00 845. 00 900. 00 915. 00 4125. 12 Seminars, conferences, workshops, exhibitions, Kisan Mela/TSG. 110. 00 145. 61 160. 00 196. 73 128. 22 740. 56 17327. 42 18807. 81 21103. 95 23031. 35 21907. 63 102178. 16 Total D Mission Management - Total -

FLOW CHART FLOW CHART