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Platform Based Design Student presentations Diana Cristina Albu Embedded Systems Platform Based Design Student presentations Diana Cristina Albu Embedded Systems

Distributed Embedded Smart Cameras for Surveillance Applications Michael Bramberger, Andreas Doblander, Arnold Maier, Bernhard Distributed Embedded Smart Cameras for Surveillance Applications Michael Bramberger, Andreas Doblander, Arnold Maier, Bernhard Rinner Graz University of Technology Helmut Schwabach Austrian Research Centers, Seibersdorf

Why this paper? Smart cameras are fun Surveillance tasks are important in today’s traffic Why this paper? Smart cameras are fun Surveillance tasks are important in today’s traffic I wanted something related to the subject but not something mentioned in class

About the paper It was a Research Feature for IEEE Computer society paper in About the paper It was a Research Feature for IEEE Computer society paper in February 2006 (Volume 39, Issue 2) It presents the design of a smart camera as a fully embedded system, with application in traffic surveillance

Smart Cameras Smart cameras are equipped with a highperformance onboard computing and communication infrastructure, Smart Cameras Smart cameras are equipped with a highperformance onboard computing and communication infrastructure, combining in a single embedded device ◦ video sensing ◦ processing ◦ communications

Networks of Embedded Cameras Networks of embedded cameras can potentially support more complex and Networks of Embedded Cameras Networks of embedded cameras can potentially support more complex and challenging applications: ◦ ◦ Smart rooms Surveillance Tracking Motion analysis

Summary “From Analog to Digital Cameras”: 1 st generation surveillance: analog equipment (closed circuit Summary “From Analog to Digital Cameras”: 1 st generation surveillance: analog equipment (closed circuit TV cameras transmitted video signal over analog lines) 2 nd generation: digital back-end components; allow real time automated analysis of incoming data 3 rd generation: complete digital transformation; video converted in digital domain at the camera and transmitted via a computer network; cameras can also compress video to save bandwidth

Summary cont. 4 th generation: intelligent cameras; perform lowlevel image processing operations on the Summary cont. 4 th generation: intelligent cameras; perform lowlevel image processing operations on the captured frames onboard to improve video compression and intelligent host efficiency ◦ however most of the processing is done at a central unit But “smart cameras” ◦ ◦ ◦ directly perform highly sophisticated video analysis video sensing video processing communication designed as reconfigurable and flexible processing nodes with self-reconfiguration, self-monitoring, and self diagnosis capabilities.

Summary cont. Shift from a central to a distributed control surveillance system ◦ Increase Summary cont. Shift from a central to a distributed control surveillance system ◦ Increase the surveillance system’s functionality, availability, and autonomy ◦ Can react autonomously to changes in the system’s environment ◦ Can detected events in the monitored scenes. A static surveillance system configuration is no longer feasible!

Proposed Architecture scalable, embedded, high-performance, multiprocessor platform consisting of a ◦ network processor ◦ Proposed Architecture scalable, embedded, high-performance, multiprocessor platform consisting of a ◦ network processor ◦ a variable number of digital signal processors (DSPs) commercial off-the-shelf software/hardware architecture was chosen ◦ support fast prototype development ◦ achieve flexibility and performance at a reasonable price

Hardware Architecture: 3 parts Sensing unit Processing unit (PU) ◦ Monochrome CMOS image sensor Hardware Architecture: 3 parts Sensing unit Processing unit (PU) ◦ Monochrome CMOS image sensor ◦ delivers images with VGA resolution at up to 30 fps ◦ transfers images via a first-in, first-out (FIFO) memory to the PU ◦ Up to 10 Texas Instruments TMS 320 C 64 x DSPs can deliver an aggregate performance of up to 80 GIPS while keeping the power consumption low ◦ PCI bus couples the DSPs and connects them to the network processor Communication unit ◦ network processor: Intel XScale IXP 425 ◦ establishes the connection between the processing and communication units ◦ controls internal and external communication ◦ currently supports two interfaces for IP-based external communication: Wired Ethernet wireless Global System for Mobile Communications/general packet radio service (GSM/GPRS)

Hardware Architecture Hardware Architecture

Software Architecture: 2 frameworks DSP framework – runs on every DSP ◦ provides an Software Architecture: 2 frameworks DSP framework – runs on every DSP ◦ provides an abstraction of the hardware and communication channels ◦ supports dynamic loading and unloading of application tasks ◦ manages the DSP’s on-chip and off-chip resources ◦ algorithms on different DSPs use the service management facilities to dynamically establish connections to each other ◦ the DSP framework was built on Texas Instruments’ DSP/BIOS operating system.

Software Architecture cont. Smart. Cam framework - runs on the network proc ◦ an Software Architecture cont. Smart. Cam framework - runs on the network proc ◦ an abstraction of the DSPs to ensure the application layer’s platform independence ◦ application layer uses the provided communication methods to exchange information internal messaging to the DSPs external IP-based communication application development by high-level interfaces to DSP algorithms and the DSP framework’s functions XScale processor runs standard Linux ◦ only customization of the Linux kernel is the DSP kernel module processor uses it to establish the connection to the DSPs via the PCI bus

Distributed System Architecture Use the smart cameras to implement a distributed intelligent video surveillance Distributed System Architecture Use the smart cameras to implement a distributed intelligent video surveillance system (IVS) Partition IVS into distributed logical groups (surveillance clusters) IVS ◦ requires an assignment of cameras to a specific cluster ◦ dynamically and autonomously maps surveillance tasks into individual cameras depending on their resources and the system’s current state

Distributed System Architecture cont. Tasks are implemented onto cameras using a mobile agent system Distributed System Architecture cont. Tasks are implemented onto cameras using a mobile agent system (MAS) built atop the Smart. Cam framework Changes in the environment trigger a task mission Quality of Service (Qo. S): Power awareness ◦ parameters include frame rate, transfer delay, image resolution, and video-compression rate ◦ levels can change over time due to user interactions or changes in the monitored environment (so novel IVS systems must include dedicated Qo. S management mechanisms) ◦ camera supports combined power and Qo. S management (Po. Qo. S) for distributed IVS systems ◦ Po. Qo. S dynamically configures the power and Qo. S level of the camera’s hardware and software to adapt to user requests and changes in the environment

Smart. Cam Prototype Commercial off the shelf hardware components to test and evaluate the Smart. Cam Prototype Commercial off the shelf hardware components to test and evaluate the video surveillance system 1 cam consists of: ◦ network processor ◦ several DSPs ◦ a CMOS image sensor

Hardware Platform: IXDP 425 Intel Processor: IXP 425 Xscale On-chip support: DSP platform PCI Hardware Platform: IXDP 425 Intel Processor: IXP 425 Xscale On-chip support: DSP platform PCI boards plugged into the baseboard, consist of Eastman Kodak’s monochrome sensor LM-9618 captures the images ◦ 533 MHz ◦ 256 Mbytes of external memory ◦ four PCI slots ◦ Ethernet access ◦ multiple serial ports ◦ PCI host controller ◦ Ateme’s network video development kits (NVDK) ◦ Each NVDK board offers 264 Mbytes of memory accessible via two different DSP external memory interfaces ◦ Texas Instruments TMS 320 C 6416 DSPs, 600 MHz ◦ high-dynamic range of up to 110 decibels at VGA resolution ◦ FIFO memory connects the sensor to one of the DSPs

System Software Network processor: Linux (Kernel 2. 6. 8. 1) ◦ access to a System Software Network processor: Linux (Kernel 2. 6. 8. 1) ◦ access to a broad variety of open source software modules The Smart. Cam framework, executes atop Linux ◦ ensures interoperability with the DSPs Java also runs atop Linux, supporting platform wide applications DSP operating system: DSP/BIOS real-time operating system (DSP framework runs atop it; serves as the Smart. Cam framework’s counterpart on the network processor)

Hardware and software parameters of a Smart. Cam equipped with 2 DSPs Hardware and software parameters of a Smart. Cam equipped with 2 DSPs

Distributed Software Mobile Agent System supports autonomous operation of the surveillance tasks Each task Distributed Software Mobile Agent System supports autonomous operation of the surveillance tasks Each task incapsulated in a mobile agent which migrate between hosts DSP agents: ◦ a module that manages the agent’s integration into its environment ◦ a DSP binary representing the agent’s functionality ◦ an optional set of intermediate data ◦ a set of DSP resource Task allocation mechanism requires these parameters to autonomously allocate surveillance tasks to smart cameras Smart. Cam agents: ◦ perform status information and communication tasks ◦ are executed on the network processor and can access the DSPs ◦ don’t include resource requirements or DSP binaries Additional agents provide system functionality ◦ task-allocation system System exploits mobile Smart. Cam agents to determine in a distributed manner how to optimally allocate surveillance tasks to the cluster’s Smart. Cams

Experimental results Two identical Smart. Cam prototypes Integrated up to three additional PCs (Pentium Experimental results Two identical Smart. Cam prototypes Integrated up to three additional PCs (Pentium III running under Linux at 1 GHz) to evaluate larger Smart. Cam networks Complete Smart. Cam framework and the MAS could execute on the PC without any modification Diet agents running under Java as the MAS and applied the Jam. VM Java virtual machine on the smart camera prototype Compared the Smart. Cam prototype’s Java performance with that of a standard PC ◦ The results showed that the interpreter-based Jam. VM is about 20 times slower than the Sun Java runtime environment (JRE) 1. 4. 2 on the PCs the native computing performance between a Pentium III PC and the Smart. Cam (XScale) differs only by a factor of two

Mode of operation Multicamera object-tracking application Multicamera system instantiates only a single tracker (agent) Mode of operation Multicamera object-tracking application Multicamera system instantiates only a single tracker (agent) task The agent follows the tracked object migrating to the Smart. Cam that should next observe the object Tracking agent based on a Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi feature tracker Main advantage is its short initialization time ◦ Applicable for multicamera object tracking by mobile agents ◦ Tracking agents control the handover process, using predefined migration regions ◦ When the tracked object enters a migration region, the tracker initiates handover to the next Smart. Cam ◦ Each migration region assigned to one or more possible next Smart. Cams ◦ Motion vectors help distinguish among several Smart. Cams assigned to the same migration region ◦ Motion vectors check whether the object moves in the correct direction ◦ A master-slave approach for the tracked object handover Tracking agent’s migration between Smart. Cams takes up to 1 second Task-allocation system’s setup time—approximately 190 milliseconds

Paper Conclusions Keys to successful deployment of smart cameras are: ◦ the integration of Paper Conclusions Keys to successful deployment of smart cameras are: ◦ the integration of sensing, computing, and communication in a small, power-aware embedded device ◦ the availability of high-level image/video processing algorithms or libraries for the embedded target processors (the DSPs) ◦ a lightweight software framework supporting glueless intra- and intercamera communication ◦ the availability of various system-level services such as task mapping and Qo. S adaptation to allow autonomous and dynamic operation of the overall multicamera system

My conclusions System usage: ◦ ◦ traffic surveillance detection of stationary vehicles detection of My conclusions System usage: ◦ ◦ traffic surveillance detection of stationary vehicles detection of wrong-way drivers computation of traffic statistics such as average speed lane occupancy vehicle classification

My conclusion The approach is good considering they are using off the shelf products My conclusion The approach is good considering they are using off the shelf products ◦ The amount of memory and power dissipation are higher than the design would require ◦ it is good for testing and research but not suitable in real world situations The Jam. VM seems to be slowing down tracker migration (about 1 sec) ◦ Maybe try another virtual machine (eg. Kaffe) migration times rather long also because of the master-slave architecture - increases resource utilization because two or more trackers are active at the same time

Thank you for your attention! ANY QUESTIONS? Thank you for your attention! ANY QUESTIONS?

Related papers An Integrated Visualization Of A Smart Camera Based Distributed Surveillance System - Related papers An Integrated Visualization Of A Smart Camera Based Distributed Surveillance System - Sven Fleck, Christian Vollrath, Florian Walter, Wolfgang Straßer WSI/GRIS, University Of Tubingen A Mobile Agent-based System For Dynamic Task Allocation In Clusters Of Embedded Smart Cameras - Michael Bramberger, Bernhard Rinner And Helmut Schwabach An Embedded Smart Camera On A Scalable Heterogeneous Multi-dsp System - Michael Bramberger, Bernhard Rinner And Helmut Schwabach Embedded Smart Cameras As Key Components In Reactive Sensor Systems Michael Bramberger, Bernhard Rinner And Helmut Schwabach Decentralized Object Tracking In A Network Of Embedded Smart Cameras - M. Quaritsch, M. Kreuzthaler, B. Rinner, B. Strobl Autonomous Multicamera Tracking On Embedded Smart Cameras - Markus Quaritsch, Markus Kreuzthaler, Bernhard Rinner, Horst Bischof, And Bernhard Strobl

References 1. W. Wolf, B. Ozer, and T. Lv, “Smart Cameras as Embedded Systems, References 1. W. Wolf, B. Ozer, and T. Lv, “Smart Cameras as Embedded Systems, ” Computer, Sept. 2002, pp. 48 -53. 2. G. L. Foresti, C. Mahonen, and C. S. Regazzoni, Multimedia Video-Based Surveillance Systems, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2000. 3. M. Bramberger, B. Rinner, and H. Schwabach, “A Method for Dynamic Allocation of Tasks in Clusters of Embedded Smart Cameras, ” Proc. Int’l Conf. Systems, Man and Cybernetics, IEEE Press, 2005, pp. 2595 -2600. 4. R. Steinmetz and K. Nahrstedt, Multimedia Systems, Springer, 2004. 5. A. Maier, B. Rinner, and H. Schwabach, “A Hierarchical Approach for Energy-Aware Distributed Embedded Intelligent Video Surveillance, ” Proc. IEEE/IFIP Int’l Workshop Parallel and Distributed Embedded Systems, IEEE Press, 2005, pp. 12 -16. 6. J. Shi and C. Tomasi, “Good Features to Track, ” Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, IEEE Press, 1994, pp. 593 -600.