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OVERALL ROBOT DESIGN, FTC STYLE PRESENTED BY: ANDY BAKER Sept. 2015 OVERALL ROBOT DESIGN, FTC STYLE PRESENTED BY: ANDY BAKER Sept. 2015

WHY SHOULD YOU LISTEN TO ME? Andy Baker • President and co-owner, Andy. Mark WHY SHOULD YOU LISTEN TO ME? Andy Baker • President and co-owner, Andy. Mark • Founded in 2004 • Crown Supplier to FIRST • [email protected] com • FIRST Mentor • FRC mentor: 1998 -current • FLL mentor: 2012 -current • FTC mentor: 2009 • Mechanical Engineer, University of Evansville, ‘ 91 • FIRST Championship WFA winner, 2003 • Husband, father of 3 teenage daughters 16

THE ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESS A method for solving a problem Can be modified to THE ENGINEERING DESIGN PROCESS A method for solving a problem Can be modified to suit the problem at hand An iterative process FIRST is an excellent opportunity to learn and practice this process! 15

PROJECT PREPARATION: GET READY! Before Kickoff Determine team goals Know your resources, strengths and PROJECT PREPARATION: GET READY! Before Kickoff Determine team goals Know your resources, strengths and limitations • Design and manufacturing skills • Build location Set schedule and expectations Determine concept design groups Determine leader to steer and manage design decisions 14

DEFINING THE FTC CHALLENGE Kickoff Watch kickoff as a team Everybody should understand the DEFINING THE FTC CHALLENGE Kickoff Watch kickoff as a team Everybody should understand the FTC Game Manual rules • Read sections aloud to each other, as a group Create lists and charts • Robot design constraints • Maximum size, allowed materials & components • How points are scored • What actions are not allowed during the game 13

THE CRITERIA FOR AN FTC ROBOT Weeks 1 &2 Build a field • Buy THE CRITERIA FOR AN FTC ROBOT Weeks 1 &2 Build a field • Buy field components you choose (certain parts / half field / full field) • Build a field using DIY instructions Breakdown the game, understand the different strategies • Create a mock game (white board, board game, full scale with people) • Create a chart of the various scoring methods and the points awarded • Estimate the time needed to score points Determine how the most points can be scored in the game • What actions carry a disproportionately large number of points • What actions may not be worth the risk Create a list of what the robot should be able to do • • 12 The answer can end up being “Everything” Rank features by order of importance for now Quantify requirements: How Fast? How Many? How Far? How Long? Keep track of this, as things can change later as more is learned

DEVELOPING FTC ROBOT CONCEPTS Weeks 1 &2 Brainstorm! • Ideas may be for only DEVELOPING FTC ROBOT CONCEPTS Weeks 1 &2 Brainstorm! • Ideas may be for only a component, not necessarily a full robot concept • Keep designs high level, don’t go down rabbit holes worrying about how it will be built • Ideas don’t have to be on paper, use simple building tools to model concepts (LEGO, cardboard, PVC pipe, wood, foam board) • Focus on accumulating as many ideas as possible • All ideas are good • Don’t criticize each other’s ideas • Look at how various concepts may work together • Often even more concepts will arise out of this discussion 11

HOW TO DECIDE end of Week 2 Review concepts against criteria and constraints, estimate HOW TO DECIDE end of Week 2 Review concepts against criteria and constraints, estimate their ability to meet them Compare relative complexity of concepts • Number of moving parts / degrees of freedom / failure modes From this analysis the leading options should begin to be evident Use a decision matrix to further rank ideas Have one focused concept, but have 1 -2 backup options as needed Have one person responsible for overseeing and enforcing final decision 10 • Put-aside method from Mr. Bill

DECISION MATRIX End of Week 2 DECISION MATRIX End of Week 2

DEVELOPING ROBOT PROTOTYPES Assign Design Groups Weeks 3 -5 • Chassis, appendages, structure Build DEVELOPING ROBOT PROTOTYPES Assign Design Groups Weeks 3 -5 • Chassis, appendages, structure Build prototypes • • Make many Keep things simple (KISS) Use alternative materials to speed construction Keep records of results (pictures, video, sketches, etc. ) Design • CAD concepts • Assign motors, actuations, sensors • Figure out gear ratios, keep your options open Iterate • Break it, fix it. Rinse and repeat! • Pay attention to new ideas which pop up here Change is still easy at this point Conduct weekly design reviews, communicate results 8

DETAILED DESIGN Weeks 5 -7 Use prototyping results to finalize design • Use CAD DETAILED DESIGN Weeks 5 -7 Use prototyping results to finalize design • Use CAD or detailed drawings for all parts and dimensions • Keep designs within the manufacturing capabilities of the team Hold regular design meetings between groups • Track packaging issues for each component as designs develop • Finalize motor use • Include transition points between dependent mechanisms designed by different groups • Design in sensors, wiring, connectors Buy materials and parts that will be needed 7

FABRICATE & ASSEMBLY Weeks 6 -8 Design in aesthetics • • Powdercoat Anodize Paint FABRICATE & ASSEMBLY Weeks 6 -8 Design in aesthetics • • Powdercoat Anodize Paint Color of materials Groups finish designs & reach this stage at different times • Drive base done first • Weigh it down during testing A more complete design will speed assembly Electrical • Mechanical contacts and connections • You are all systems engineers in training. • Reliability: make things neat, color coded, labeled 6

TEST! Weeks 8 -9 Test drivetrain early • Weigh down drivetrain to 40 -50 TEST! Weeks 8 -9 Test drivetrain early • Weigh down drivetrain to 40 -50 pounds, drive it on Soft Tiles Begin testing components as they come together • Break it early! • Early breaks = early fixes Program, drive, and test as much as possible • Install automodes • Break it early! Celebrate breaking things! Plan for things to fail or break. • Take time to iterate designs and re-build components that do not work as planned. 5

PRACTICE! Practice • Practice, practice and then practice Break it again Practice some more PRACTICE! Practice • Practice, practice and then practice Break it again Practice some more • Practice, practice and then practice Break it again! Oh, and tweak your code 4 Weeks 10 -12

COMPETE AND UPDATE 2 weeks before Get as much done before competition as possible COMPETE AND UPDATE 2 weeks before Get as much done before competition as possible • Plan your logistics well so you can focus on improving the robot • Finish your robot! The earlier you pass inspection at the competition, the better your chances are to compete well. Watch events to determine which designs work well • Improve your designs, learning from what you see • Fabricate improvements Watch other events to determine winning gameplay • This helps focus practice Have spare parts created and available at competition 3

HOW LONG SHOULD THIS TAKE? Timeline Before Kickoff Determine goals, schedule, resources, leaders Week HOW LONG SHOULD THIS TAKE? Timeline Before Kickoff Determine goals, schedule, resources, leaders Week 1 -2 Understand game, Quantify points, Create list of robot tasks Week 1 -2 Brainstorm, Critique, Present, Decide on concept, Put-aside Week 3 -5 Assign design tasks, Finish prototypes, Begin CAD, Assign actuators, Buy needed robot items Week 5 -7 Finish Drivetrain CAD, Build Drivetrain, Finish programming structure, Finalize appendage designs, Drive robot, Design graphics and aesthetics Week 6 -8 Finish fabrication of all parts, Break things, Install wiring, Implement programming Week 8 -9 Break more things, Install automodes, Get appendage mechanisms to work Week 10 -12 2 Task Break and fix appendages, Practice, Install paint and graphics, Ensure spare parts are made

THANK YOU! Questions? 1 THANK YOU! Questions? 1