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Orientation to Brewing Boeing Employees Wine and Beer Makers Club Orientation to Brewing Boeing Employees Wine and Beer Makers Club

Overview n n Introduction to Homebrewing Ingredients Equipment Brewing ¡ ¡ n Brew Day Overview n n Introduction to Homebrewing Ingredients Equipment Brewing ¡ ¡ n Brew Day Bottling Day Results

Homebrewing n Legal, fun, and rewarding ¡ ¡ n Nationally re-legalized in 1978 Still Homebrewing n Legal, fun, and rewarding ¡ ¡ n Nationally re-legalized in 1978 Still not recognized in a few states (Washington – OK) 100 gallons person/year, 200 gallons per household Just don’t sell it (but it is traded quite often!) Why homebrew? ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ Relaxing Variety – customized beer Fun Ease Cost Socialization Art / Science

What’s in beer? n Malt sugars – food for yeast making alcohol ¡ ¡ What’s in beer? n Malt sugars – food for yeast making alcohol ¡ ¡ n More sugar, more potential for alcohol Grains impart malt flavor Hops – bitterness, flavor, and aroma ¡ Depends on when added n n n Early – bitterness Late – flavor Very late - aroma Water – 95% of beer Yeast – conducts the fermentation ¡ ¡ Different strains produce different flavors Ales vs Lagers

References and Sources n American Homebrewer’s Association ¡ n Beer Nut – Utah Homebrewing References and Sources n American Homebrewer’s Association ¡ n Beer Nut – Utah Homebrewing Store ¡ n http: //www. larrysbrewsupply. com Beer, and More Beer ¡ n http: //www. beernut. com/Web_store/extract. pdf Larry’s Brewing Supply ¡ n http: //www. beertown. org/homebrewing/beginning. html http: //www. morebeer. com Books ¡ ¡ The Complete Joy of Homebrewing The Homebrewer’s Companion

Homebrewing Overview n Brewing Day (2 -3 hours) ¡ n Primary Fermentation (3 -7 Homebrewing Overview n Brewing Day (2 -3 hours) ¡ n Primary Fermentation (3 -7 days) ¡ n Beer is transferred, receives sugar for carbonation, and is bottled Waiting (2+ weeks) ¡ n Remaining sugars fermented, yeast go dormant Bottling (2 -3 hours) ¡ n Clear “green” beer is siphoned away from sediment Secondary Fermentation (7 -14 days) ¡ n Yeast devour sugars and produce alcohol Racking (Siphoning) (30 minutes) ¡ n Boiling malt extract and hops to create yeast food Start brewing more beer while waiting Drinking (gets fuzzy) ¡ Lecture will use Beer Nut guide as reference

Ingredients for 5 gallons (standard) n n n n n Beginner – Intermediate! 5 Ingredients for 5 gallons (standard) n n n n n Beginner – Intermediate! 5 -7 lbs hop-flavored malt extract or… 5 -7 lbs unhopped malt extract or… 6 -10 lbs malt (advanced) 0 -2 lbs specialty grains 0 -3 oz hops 5 gallons water 1 yeast package Bottling: ¾ cup dextrose or 1 ¼ cup dry malt extract

Today’s Recipe: ESB n n n 7 lb Light Malt Extract 2 oz 10 Today’s Recipe: ESB n n n 7 lb Light Malt Extract 2 oz 10 L Crystal Malt 8 oz 20 L Crystal Malt 4 oz 60 L Crystal Malt 1 oz Victory Wheat Malt 4 oz Belgian Biscuit Malt 4 oz Belgian Aromatic Malt 1. 5 oz Kent Goldings Pellet Hops (@5. 3% AA) – 60 mins (bitterness) 1. 5 oz Kent Golding Pellet Hops (@5. 3% AA) – 10 mins (flavor) 1. 0 oz Kent Golding Leaf Hops (@4. 2% AA) – steep (aroma) 1 pack Fermentis S-04 English Ale Yeast

Basic Equipment n Things you will already have: ¡ Pot with 1. 5 -5 Basic Equipment n Things you will already have: ¡ Pot with 1. 5 -5 gallon capacity n ¡ ¡ Aim for 2. 5 gallons at least to prevent boil-overs Cooking spoon – plastic or metal Can opener Measuring cup (at least 1 cup) Clean cup or small bowl (possibly with lid)

Basic Equipment n Basic items you will need to buy ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ Basic Equipment n Basic items you will need to buy ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ 6. 5 – 7 gallon plastic bucket with tight fitting lid with hole drilled in the top (for attaching airlock) Airlock and stopper – sized for bucket Racking cane and 5 -6’ tubing: racking = siphoning Bottling bucket with spigot (typically 6. 5 -7 gallons) Bottle filler Bottle capper Sanitizing agent Bottles – not twist-off Bottle cleaning brush Notebook

Optional Accessories n n Hydrometer Glass carboy(s) ¡ ¡ n n Large funnel Carboy Optional Accessories n n Hydrometer Glass carboy(s) ¡ ¡ n n Large funnel Carboy handle Thermometer Nylon grain/hop bag Bottle washer Expendables: ¡ ¡ Bottle caps Muslin grain/hop bags

Kits Available at Larry’s n Basic Starter Kit $49. 95 ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ Kits Available at Larry’s n Basic Starter Kit $49. 95 ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ n 6 gal plastic fermenter w/spigot and airlock LCD Thermometer The New Complete Joy of Homebrewing 4 ft Transfer Tubing Twin lever bottle capper 144 bottle caps 3/4 cup priming sugar 6 gal plastic priming bucket w/spigot Basic Carboy Kit $72. 95 ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ n 6 gal carboy, stopper and airlock LCD Thermometer The New Complete Joy of Homebrewing 4 ft Transfer Tubing Twin lever bottle capper 144 bottle caps Slant funnel Carboy brush 3/4 cup priming sugar 6 gal plastic priming bucket w/spigot Deluxe Kits (add $105): Add to the basic kit ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ n 20 ft wort chiller Hydrometer 20 qt stock pot 18 in plastic paddle 8 oz I-O-Safe 2 cases 12 oz beer bottles Bottle washer and adapter 3 lb Briess Pilsen Light Unhopped Extract Any can of Munton's Hopped Kit Personal Recommended Additions to Basic Kit ¡ ¡ Hydrometer Bottle washer and adapter 5 gal carboy Nylon grain/hop bag

Sanitization / Sterilization n If you are very careful to sanitize all your equipment Sanitization / Sterilization n If you are very careful to sanitize all your equipment you can be assured that every batch of beer you make will be excellent Sanitation is very simple but so important that you must make it a ritual before any brewing activity Sanitize (clean) first, sterilize second ¡ ¡ ¡ n n Once clean, soak items in a sanitizing solution (bleach, one-step, iodophor, or Stan) Whenever you transfer the beer, never start the siphon with your mouth ¡ ¡ n Any deposits on the equipment will harbor bacteria which the sanitizing solution will not be able to reach Do not clean with any abrasive cleaners or equipment which could scratch your equipment Scratches in plastic are notorious for harboring beer spoiling bacteria There always bacteria and wild yeast in your mouth Either prime the siphon using tap water or use a siphon starter Beginner’s Best Friend: Clorox (sanitizer and sterilant)

Sanitation/Sterilization n On brewing day, this includes the following items: ¡ ¡ ¡ n Sanitation/Sterilization n On brewing day, this includes the following items: ¡ ¡ ¡ n On racking day, this includes: ¡ ¡ ¡ n Fermenter & lid Air lock parts and stopper Thermometer Hydrometer Funnel (if applicable) Cup or bowl used for mixing the yeast Racking cane and transfer tubing Hydrometer Secondary fermentation vessel On bottling day, this includes: ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ Racking or Bottling Bucket Racking cane and transfer tubing Bottle filler Measuring cup used for priming sugar Hydrometer Bottles and bottle caps Any other object that comes into contact with the beer

Let’s get started…Heating Extract n n n Remove the lids and labels from all Let’s get started…Heating Extract n n n Remove the lids and labels from all the cans or jars of malt extract Place these containers in a pan/sink of warm (not hot) water and let sit This step is not strictly necessary but makes pouring the extract much easier and quicker

Steeping Specialty Grains n Add ½ - 1 gallon of water to your brewpot Steeping Specialty Grains n Add ½ - 1 gallon of water to your brewpot ¡ n n Make sure that you leave enough space so that after adding the malt there will be at least a few inches of headspace to keep from boiling over If your kit doesn't use grains then proceed to the next step (but add an extra ½ gallon of water to your pot) If your kit includes specialty grains, take these grains and pour them into the steeping bag ¡ ¡ Tie the bag and place it into the pot Bring the water to 155 F and hold at that temp for 30 -45 min In a smaller pot, bring ½ gallon of water to 180 F After time has expired, carefully remove the grain bag from the water with a set of tongs and “rinse” the grains with the ½ gallon of water n Do not squeeze grains – extracts harsh flavors

Adding Malt Extract and Hops n Once water is close to boiling, take the Adding Malt Extract and Hops n Once water is close to boiling, take the brewpot off the heat and add the malt extract while stirring constantly ¡ ¡ n n n By removing the pot from the heat you reduce the chances of scorching the extract on the bottom of the pot If your kit has dry malt extract, always add this before the water is boiling (won’t clump as much) Once the malt has been mixed into the water put the mixture (called the wort) back on the heat and bring to a boil Place the bittering hops into a hop bag, tie the bag closed, and add to the boiling wort Take note of the time that the boil started Allow the wort to boil for 60 minutes at a slow rolling boil If your kit has “flavor” hops, add them with 10 -15 minutes before the end of the boil (follow recipe)

Adding Finishing Hops and Cooling Wort n n If your kit comes with finishing/aroma Adding Finishing Hops and Cooling Wort n n If your kit comes with finishing/aroma hops place them into a hop bag and add them to the boiling wort 2 -5 minutes before the end of the 60 -minute boil At the end of the 60 minute boil, remove the pot from the heat and place lid onto pot Place the boiling pot into a sink or tub of cold water. Use ice if tap water is not very cold Allow the wort to cool for about 15 -30 minutes ¡ n During this time it is very important not to open the lid or allow unsanitized items contact the wort in any way Fill your already-sanitized plastic or glass fermenter about one-half to two-thirds full (approximately three gallons, or 11. 36 L) with cold tap water

Rehydrating the Yeast n n n Rehydrate the brewing yeast by bringing 5 -6 Rehydrating the Yeast n n n Rehydrate the brewing yeast by bringing 5 -6 oz of brewing water to a boil and allowing this to cool to at least 100 F Stir in yeast until mixed and cover. Allow the yeast to rehydrate for approximately 10 minutes If you are using a liquid culture, you should have “smacked” the pack days in advance (unless working from a vial) ¡ ¡ Liquid cultures typically are more “pure” Carefully selected yeast strains for particular flavors n Ales versus Lagers

Aeration n When the wort has cooled sufficiently pour the wort into your plastic Aeration n When the wort has cooled sufficiently pour the wort into your plastic fermenter which is half full of cold water ¡ n n n NEVER POUR HOT WORT INTO AN EMPTY GLASS CARBOY! Top up the wort to the five gallon mark with cool water Splash the cool water vigorously while adding it to the wort Affix the lid and rock the bucket vigorously to both mix the wort and to further aerate it Aerating the cooled wort allows oxygen to dissolve into the beer and gives the yeast the necessary nutrient for growth NEVER SPLASH AROUND HOT WORT! ¡ ¡ Aeration while the wort is hot leads to oxidation and will give you stale tasting beer Never splash around already fermented beer; this oxidizes the alcohols and leads to cardboard flavors.

Starting Gravity Reading n n n With a sanitized glass or baster remove a Starting Gravity Reading n n n With a sanitized glass or baster remove a small quantity of wort and fill your hydrometer jar (the tube your hydrometer came in) approximately 3/4 full Pitch (add) the rehydrated yeast to the fermenter when the temperature of the wort is lower than 80°F and affix the lid and airlock, filling airlock 1/2 full with water Put the fermenter away in a warm (65 F) area away from direct sunlight Float your hydrometer in the jar and give it a quick spin to dislodge any trapped air bubbles Sight across the liquid level at the lowest point and make note of where the hydrometer reads on the S. G. scale

Fermentation n n You should notice the beginning of fermentation in about 24 -48 Fermentation n n You should notice the beginning of fermentation in about 24 -48 hours and this will continue for 3 to 7 days depending on the temperature (aim for 60 -70 degrees) After all apparent bubbling has stopped, wait another 3 days and take another specific gravity reading, using a sanitized baster or wine thief, and note the reading It should be approximately 1/4 of the original gravity. I. e. if you read an original gravity of 1. 040 you should be near a final gravity of 1. 010 Wait another two days and take a third reading ¡ ¡ If the last two readings are the same then it is time to bottle If you didn't take an initial gravity reading don't worry; take the second and third readings and just make certain that they are not changing

Racking (Siphoning) n n n If you have the equipment, towards the end of Racking (Siphoning) n n n If you have the equipment, towards the end of the primary fermentation it is beneficial to siphon the beer to another container Siphoning helps clarification (chemical aids can be used as well, but are unnecessary for producing great beer) Siphons can be hard to start (do not use your mouth because of “infection” potential) ¡ ¡ ¡ Use racking cane and hose filled with water Siphon starters available commercially Carbon dioxide pressure (requires kegging setup)

Bottling – Sanitizing Bottles n Clean and sanitize bottles ¡ ¡ If the bottles Bottling – Sanitizing Bottles n Clean and sanitize bottles ¡ ¡ If the bottles are anything besides brand-new, it is best to brush them out with the bottle cleaning brush If they are new, you can simply soak them in a sanitizer You can use a sink or bathtub but I like to use another 5 gallon plastic bucket You must also sanitize the bottle caps by soaking them in boiling water (at least 5 minutes)

Bottling – Priming n n Boil the priming sugar in one pint of water Bottling – Priming n n Boil the priming sugar in one pint of water (at least 5 minutes) and add this mixture to bottling bucket Transfer (rack) beer from fermenter to bottling bucket using the racking tube and siphon hose Use either the siphon priming method described in your brewing handbook, or a siphon starter to get the siphon going Be very careful not to aerate the beer at this point ¡ Mix the priming sugar into the beer by gently stirring with the racking cane (siphoning beer will actually do most of the work)

Bottling n n n Connect the tubing to the spigot on the bottling bucket Bottling n n n Connect the tubing to the spigot on the bottling bucket and the bottle filler Turn on spigot and allow beer to flow through spigot and hose into bottle filler Use Filler to fill bottles to about 1” from top Place a cap on top of each bottle as they are filled and continue until all bottles have been filled Go back and cap each bottle in the order they were filled ¡ Delayed capping allows the dissolved CO 2 to purge the headspace of any oxygen

Aging n n n This priming sugar added at bottling time will result in Aging n n n This priming sugar added at bottling time will result in a secondary fermentation in the bottles which produces the carbonation The beer should be left in an area away from direct sunlight where the temperature is between 68 -75 F to ensure complete carbonation After seven days, give each bottle a twist to dislodge any yeast which may be clinging to the sides of the bottles The beer will be best after allowing it to age for a month or so So at this point go ahead and enjoy ¡ Remember to save a few bottles for comparison against the later batches

Adjustments n n Now is the time to decide what changes to make to Adjustments n n Now is the time to decide what changes to make to the recipe for your second batch While tasting your beer take good notes about what you think of the bitterness level, hop flavor, color, maltiness, etc. After a while you will start to get a feel for what each ingredient adds to the beer This is where the real fun comes from, adjusting the recipe to your tastes

About BEWBC n n BEWBC began in 1972 strictly as a wine making club. About BEWBC n n BEWBC began in 1972 strictly as a wine making club. In the mid-80's the club began to offer a wide variety of beer making supplies and many members began to join the club to brew better beer. We currently offer a variety of both wine and beer events, classes, and social activities. The monthly meetings, which usually alternate between wine and beer, typically include a presentation by a knowledgeable guest speaker. By sharing experiences and sampling each others creations we all enhance our skill and knowledge in this ancient art.

Club Activities n n n n n Seminars and Speakers -Wine and beer experts Club Activities n n n n n Seminars and Speakers -Wine and beer experts of recognized standing discuss subjects of general interest. Wine Competition - Extensive varieties of wine made by members are judged by experts. Homebrew Competition - Beers made by members are professionally judged. - Picnic and fun. Wine and Beer Making Courses - Classes offered to Club members and spouses Club Store - Stocks a wide variety of wine and beer making supplies and equipment at substantial savings. Club Equipment - Free use of equipment used in wine and beer making Monthly Newsletter - Features entertaining and educational articles on winemaking and homebrewing Library - A large collection of wine and beer books and magazines is available for loan to members Grapes - Cooperative grape purchases at favorable prices on Washington, Oregon, and California grapes

Joining n Contact: Al Cutshall ¡ ¡ n Annual dues (prorated quarterly) ¡ ¡ Joining n Contact: Al Cutshall ¡ ¡ n Annual dues (prorated quarterly) ¡ ¡ n Work Phone (206) 655 -0645 E-MAIL alden. d. [email protected] com Employees $30. 00 Retirees $20. 00 Website (membership forms available on web): ¡ http: //www. bewbc. org

Final Words n n Join the club and join the forum! If you need Final Words n n Join the club and join the forum! If you need help, contact a club member or talk to the people in your brewing supply store ¡ n Grab a kit, a book, and a recipe: the rest will come over time ¡ ¡ n n n Beer is the best repayment Be patient Be clean Have fun Brew what you like, not what someone says you should Keep good records for later use If a batch goes bad, wait, or use it for cooking! Relax, don’t worry, have a homebrew

Questions Questions

Standard Questions n My beer fermented for only 1 day. Is something wrong? ¡ Standard Questions n My beer fermented for only 1 day. Is something wrong? ¡ n I didn't see any bubbling in the airlock!? ! ¡ n No, everything is fine. Fermentation can take anywhere from 24 hours to 10 days depending on yeast strain and temperature. Don't worry yet. Pop open the lid and look for signs of foam on top of the beer or a decent sized scum ring around the bucket above the level of the beer. If you see either of these the beer is fine; the lid simply wasn't seated down tight enough. My beer did _____ should I dump it out? ¡ ¡ No, no. Always taste your beer before passing judgement. Also, give it at least several months before totally giving up on a problem beer. Many off characteristics age away into beautiful beers. In the worst case, bad beer makes a great replacement for water when cooking