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Oil&Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Use Cases & Scenarios August 22, 2008 Copyright Oil&Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Use Cases & Scenarios August 22, 2008 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Enterprise Risk Management: Key Business Driver for Open Standardsbased Interoperability Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Enterprise Risk Management: Key Business Driver for Open Standardsbased Interoperability Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Enterprise Risk Management § Due to pressures of financial markets and competition, businesses are Enterprise Risk Management § Due to pressures of financial markets and competition, businesses are often driven to a lowest-cost, near-term operating model which still meets their identified requirements for providing a product or service of the required quality and quantity to their customers § Government regulatory bodies often seek to provide a counter-balancing force to help assure some level of health, safety and environmental risk management is applied within given industry groups under their jurisdiction § Rather than looking at this as an inevitable conflict, world-class businesses and governmental regulators are increasingly realizing that they must partner in order to achieve operations that are both optimal on a near-term basis and sustainable on a long-term basis including acceptable Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S) risks § Achieving such unity of purpose requires an approach to capturing and managing overall enterprise performance information in a fashion that properly includes all operational risks § Once this is done, all businesses in a given sector can be properly judged on an even playing field which properly rewards businesses for their systemic approach to risk management § Some businesses already “sell” themselves as green or safe organizations, but we need greatly improved ways of modeling, monitoring and managing risks where economic rewards properly flow to enterprises for doing the “right thing”. Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Enterprise Risk Management § Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) can be broken down into several Enterprise Risk Management § Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) can be broken down into several major sub-classes, but a major set of the risks, associated with EH&S risks are tightly interwoven and require a “bottom up” solutions approach based on sound engineering and business practices § The same sound practices which help manage EHS risks, also contribute to properly managing the Operational risks associated with properly meeting a customers requirements for product or services quality (including product safety) and quantity § As enterprises continue to extend their supply chains on a global basis, end-to-end risk management is going to become a larger and larger issue, where these risks must be properly modeled, monitored and managed on an inter-enterprise basis spanning cultures, industries and vast numbers of interrelated systems and sub-systems § Rather than being subject to failure prone manual methods of capture and reporting, risk management related information must be systemically captured, evaluated and escalated so that accountability and the required risk management information flow together. Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Enterprise Risk Management § In the overall world of Operations and Maintenance (O&M) there Enterprise Risk Management § In the overall world of Operations and Maintenance (O&M) there a series of tasks which are often done on a limited and/or uncoordinated basis, which would provide a solid foundation for both Operational and EH&S risk management, if the processes were seen to be interrelated and the surrounding envelope of enterprise information was properly managed as a valuable enterprise asset § Many different organizations within a given enterprise and its business partners, who do not normally act in a well coordinated way, need to be brought together in a holistic manner, so that they can properly and efficiently support both their own business unit requirements and ERM § The problem space spans multiple functional domains in multiple enterprises, in multiple industries in multiple countries where no single vendor or even small combination of vendors provides a total solution and traditional systems integration approaches are useless § In order to achieve the required levels of interoperability, substantial collaboration and coordination is required in process models, data models, data formats, metadata, and industry data as part of a comprehensive approach to enterprise information and knowledge management § Open Standards-based Interoperability provides a practical strategy for achieving the required levels of data, information, systems and human interoperability on an incremental and sustainable basis. Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

The Opportunity § Organizations are already struggling to enable and sustain required levels of The Opportunity § Organizations are already struggling to enable and sustain required levels of systems integration between their various Operations & Maintenance (O&M) systems ü Intra-Enterprise P 2 B Interoperability ü Inter-Enterprise SCM Interoperability § Supporting critical new business risk management requirements will require significant new levels of systems interoperability ü ü Reliability Management Safety Management-(Process Safety Management-National Emphasis Program) Quality Management Environmental Management § Leveraging of appropriate open standards enables the dovetailing between O&M Activities and Life-cycle Engineering providing the basis for open standardsbased interoperability that is ü ü Agile Scalable Repeatable Sustainable Key Objective - Enable a fundamental shift from projectcentric systems integration to industry-centric open-standards based interoperability Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

The Open. O&M™ Solution: Open Standards & Collaboration Get Everyone on the Same Page The Open. O&M™ Solution: Open Standards & Collaboration Get Everyone on the Same Page & Fill the Whitespace Enterprise Business Systems Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Physical Asset Control Real-time Systems Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Maintenance Operations Open. O&M™

Open. O&M™ Initiative Current Participating Standards Organizational Model Open. O&M™ Initiative Joint Working Groups Open. O&M™ Initiative Current Participating Standards Organizational Model Open. O&M™ Initiative Joint Working Groups Open. O&M™ MFG JWG ISA-95 WBF, OAGi Life-cycle MGT NIBS Open. O&M™ Military JWG US Army US Navy Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Open. O&M™ Facilities JWG NIBS FMOC

MIMOSA Summary An Operations and Maintenance Information Open Systems Alliance § A 501 (c) MIMOSA Summary An Operations and Maintenance Information Open Systems Alliance § A 501 (c) (6) non profit organization § Web Site: www. mimosa. org § Funded by membership and collaborative projects ü Vendors ü Integrators ü End-Users § Publishing interoperability standards & specifications ü Free public licensing of final versions since 1998 ü Members licensing of work in progress • Standards & Specifications • Tools & Technology Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

MIMOSA Collaboration For Open. O&M™ § § § § Open. O&M™ Manufacturing JWG: OPC, MIMOSA Collaboration For Open. O&M™ § § § § Open. O&M™ Manufacturing JWG: OPC, ISA-95, WBF/B 2 MML, OAGi… Open. O&M™ Facilities JWG: NIBS FMOC Open. O&M™ Military JWG: U. S. Army and U. S. Navy MIMOSA Center of Excellence: U. S. Army AMRDEC SED SMRP: Mapping MIMOSA Stds To SMRP Body of Knowledge ISO Draft STD 18435: TC 184/SC 5/WG 7–D-Liaison (O&M Integration) Chair ISO TC 184 Manufacturing Asset Management Integration Task Force ISO STD 13374: TC 108/SC 5 - Condition Monitoring & Diagnostics- MIMOSA is the Informative Reference Technical Committee 108 Sub-Committee 5 Working Group 6 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Technical Committee 184 Sub-Committee 5 Working Group 7

DRAFT ISO 18435 Application Domain Integration Diagram Update Application Domain Integration Diagram A 4. DRAFT ISO 18435 Application Domain Integration Diagram Update Application Domain Integration Diagram A 4. 1 – Intra-enterprise activities: Business Planning, Orders & Production, and Maintenance A 4. 2 – Inter-enterprise activities: Supply Chain Planning, Logistics Strategy Level R 4 Enterprise / Site A 3. 1 - Operations Planning & Scheduling A 3. 2 – Capability Assessment & Order Fulfillment A 3. 3 - Maintenance Planning & Scheduling Level R 3 Area A 2. 1 - Supervisory Control & Human-Machine Interface A 2. 2 - Asset Prognostics and Health, Quality, Safety, & Environmental Management A 2. 3 - Maintenance Execution & Tracking Level R 2 Work Center A 1. 1 - Control, I/O, Data Acquisition, Data Historian, Asset Utilization, & Displays A 1. 2 - Asset Condition Monitoring & Sample / Test / Diagnostic & Quality Monitoring A 1. 3 - Asset Configuration, Calibration & Repair / Replace A 0. 1 - Resource Identification and Location Resources ( Material / Personnel ) A 0. 2 - Asset Identification and Location Assets (Equipment / Facilities / Serialized Components / Sensors / Transducers / Software / Documents) Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Level R 1 Work Unit Level R 0 Asset

MIMOSA Open Interoperability Model Asset Management Functional Domains Open Modeling For: • Plants • MIMOSA Open Interoperability Model Asset Management Functional Domains Open Modeling For: • Plants • Facilities • Fleets Open Reliability Management Open Maintenance Management Open Object Registry Management Open Condition Management Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Open Modeling Of: • Physical Assets • Functional Segments • Resources • Agents

MIMOSA Open Systems Architecture for Enterprise Application Integration (OSA-EAI) Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Copyright 2006 MIMOSA Open Systems Architecture for Enterprise Application Integration (OSA-EAI) Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Copyright 2006 MIMOSA

Owner/Operator Leadership With Vendor Support Selected Supporting Organizations-Petrochemical and Oil and Gas Industry Copyright Owner/Operator Leadership With Vendor Support Selected Supporting Organizations-Petrochemical and Oil and Gas Industry Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Open. O&M™ Owner/Operator Leadership Council Oil and Gas Leadership Team § Mike Brooks - Open. O&M™ Owner/Operator Leadership Council Oil and Gas Leadership Team § Mike Brooks - Chevron, MESA Oil and Gas Working Group – Acting Chair § Mike Knight, Greg Pattinson – BP § Cliff Pederson - Suncor, NPRA Technical Committee Co-chair § Fayez Kharbat – Saudi Aramco, MESA Oil and Gas Working Group Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Open. O&M Owner/Operator Leadership Councils § The Open. O&M™ Initiative addresses many of the Open. O&M Owner/Operator Leadership Councils § The Open. O&M™ Initiative addresses many of the required elements for collaboration and coordination on an interdisciplinary, cross-industry basis § The participating standards organizations provide key standards addressing processes, data and information on a cross-industry basis § The Owner/Operators are being organized into industry-focused councils providing input, oversight and prioritization with respect to the development of critical interoperability use-cases and scenarios as part of an overall industry-driven strategy § Many of the individual use cases address high-value added activities which need to be properly addressed in projects that are routinely occurring § When they are combined as part of a coordinated strategy, each effort contributes towards the enterprise requirements for interoperability in a defined way, resulting in greater enterprise benefits and lower costs § Taken as a whole, the use cases and the underlying scenarios support many of the key building blocks for ERM while also addressing many near-term “low hanging fruit” industry requirements. Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Open. O&M Owner/Operator Leadership Councils § The following slides cover industry-specific use cases and Open. O&M Owner/Operator Leadership Councils § The following slides cover industry-specific use cases and their relationships to scenarios showing the associated interaction between systems § The included use cases have been collected primarily from the Oil and Gas, Petrochemical and Chemical industry § Over time, other use cases, including both other functional areas and other industry groups will be collected, documented and prioritized § The use cases are then related to the appropriate scenarios depicting the associated systems interactions § Functional experts from the owner/operator community will validate and prioritize the use cases on an industry basis § IT/IS experts from both the Owner/Operator and vendor communities will validate the associated scenarios § Finally, working in conjunction with both the Owner/Operators and vendors, industrystandards experts provide a mapping of the standards-based methods to be employed in order to achieve the required levels of sustainable interoperability depicted in the scenarios § Many of the use cases from differing industries are expected to map back to a common set of scenarios and methods § The combination will provide both the Owner/Operators and the key vendors an industry specified strategy for achieving sustainable Open Standards-based Interoperability on an incremental basis, where individual product development and implementation efforts can be properly co-aligned for mutual benefit. Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Oil & Gas / Petrochemical / Chemical Use Cases Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Oil & Gas / Petrochemical / Chemical Use Cases Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #1 § § § “Handover” of As-Designed Information from Engineering, Procurement, and Use Case #1 § § § “Handover” of As-Designed Information from Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) Contractor(s) to Owner/Operator: A core problem for Owner/Operators (O/O), vendors and systems implementers is the lack of good mechanisms for managing the needed information exchanges between EPC activities and the O&M related systems, applications and technologies. Information to Be Exchanged: Information is needed to properly "bootstrap" O&M systems with as-designed functional segment data, including P&ID diagram information related to process/equipment data sheets. Need to have access to "tag" databases which identify where sensors have been installed for control and monitoring, related to the process equipment they are monitoring, and the meta-data about them (tag ID, update frequency, engineering unit, etc. ). Scenarios Activated: #4 and #7 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #2 § § § Recurring Updates - Send Open Engineering Upgrades to Use Case #2 § § § Recurring Updates - Send Open Engineering Upgrades to O&M: Once a site is operational, plant or facility engineering and design organizations may continue to make changes to the “as designed” information models on a recurring basis. These changes can be driven by the need to operate more efficiently or with greater safety in support of the originally intended process supporting the same product mix or they can be associated with the need to change the process to yield new products, not envisioned in the original design. Once the new design information is developed it may be managed in several different ways depending on the driver for the change and the associated priority it will be assigned. Depending on the nature and scale of the changes involved, the actual work may be performed by the maintenance staff, a maintenance contractor or a construction contractor. In all cases, some type of appropriate feedback loop must be provided to ensure that the status is known and shared by Engineering Reference Databases and O&M systems. Information to Be Exchanged: Need to propagate changes to functional segment data, including P&ID diagram information related to process/equipment data sheets with guaranteed delivery despite network hiccups. Scenarios Activated: #5, #8, and #24 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #3 § § § Field Engineering – Changes Sent To Plant or Use Case #3 § § § Field Engineering – Changes Sent To Plant or Facilities Engineering: In a perfect world, fully leveraging best practices, all engineering changes would flow through the enterprise design engineering and approval systems on a “waterfall” basis, even if the actual design work is done locally or through an independent contractor. All such engineering changes would be fully reconciled and rationalized before the work was actually done and the integrity of the Engineering Reference Databases would be ensured as a specialization of use case 2. Unfortunately, there are many situations where this does not occur (and may be impractical). This frequently results when a centralized plant or facilities engineering organization is overwhelmed by emergent situations and the plant or facilities manager must take responsibility for the situation without the ideal level of centralized support. Lack of proper synchronization of this work can result in anomalies with respect to the system of record for the engineering information, since in this case, the most up-to-date As-Designed information is flowing from the field to the enterprise, rather than the other way around. Information to Be Exchanged: The information is very similar to that which is contained in Use Case 2, but it now needs to flow from the field to the Engineering Reference Database so that the systems can be kept in synch. Need to propagate changes to functional segment data, including P&ID diagram information related to process/equipment data sheets with guaranteed delivery despite network hiccups. Scenarios Activated: #8 and #9 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #4 § § § Open On-line Product Data Library: All of the Use Case #4 § § § Open On-line Product Data Library: All of the Use Cases contained in this document anticipate the on-line availability of appropriate product data libraries containing the detailed engineering reference information for makes and models of important classes of physical assets. Critical elements of ERM including both Operational Risk Management (ORM) and EH&S depend on the Enterprise Asset Management (EAM), Reliability Management (RM), Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) and ORM systems leveraging the most current product data. Manufacturers are often reluctant to publish some quality and reliability data about their products which is extremely important and this information needs to be gathered from trusted third parties and/or internal operating experience. As this new experience-based information becomes available, it also needs to be properly persisted and synchronized. Information to Be Exchanged: For all key originally installed and replaced equipment, ORM and EAM systems need on-line access to motor/pump/gear/bearing/valve/sensor OEM cut-sheet specification data in order for ORM systems to perform equipment diagnostics, validate current configurations meet the required process requirements, and for EAM systems to display to maintenance personnel. ORM and EAM systems need to know if this data is subsequently updated/modified to adjust algorithms with guaranteed delivery. ORM and EAM systems also need to ability to transfer newly-discovered product data into the PDM master database. Scenarios Activated: #1, #2, #3, and #23 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #5 § § Automatic O&M Configuration (Remove/Replace) Updates: One of the largest Use Case #5 § § Automatic O&M Configuration (Remove/Replace) Updates: One of the largest headaches for any complex facility or plant is keeping accurate track of the uniquely identified physical assets which are currently installed in a given functional location. Use Cases 1 and 2 deal with “top-down” Design Engineeringdriven activities and Use Case 3 deals with the situation where this is a “bottomup” process, but routine remove/ replace operations are work flow-driven rather than design-driven. While all organizations make an attempt to properly keep track of this information for classes of assets with critical functions, experience has shown that substantial process and information gaps routinely exist. After a few years of operations, there is often a substantial difference between the assets that are shown to be installed in the system of record and those that actually are installed. This situation is normally verified and at-least partially corrected when a “walk down” takes place in conjunction with the implementation of some new related system (such as an EAM system). This is an expensive, labor intensive process and it does not solve the fundamental problem, which results in its recurrence. Lack of proper management of this seemingly straight-forward element of configuration change can have profound consequences for reliability, EH&S, quality, yield. Information to Be Exchanged: When a fieldbus device is replaced and a CMS system is able to sense that a new device has been removed/installed, it should immediately update the registry (REG) system of this configuration change, which should then be propagated to all other O&M systems. When data is keyed into an EAM system that an asset removal and/or installation has taken place, it should immediately update the registry (REG) system of this configuration change, which should then be propagated to all other O&M systems with guaranteed delivery despite any potential network connectivity and/or latency problems. Scenarios Activated: #6, #28 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #6 § § Open Automatic Preventive Maintenance (PM) Triggering: While there has Use Case #6 § § Open Automatic Preventive Maintenance (PM) Triggering: While there has sometimes been confusion between automated triggering of PM and the evolving trend to use more Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) PM, along with Corrective Maintenance (CM) continue to be part of the “Maintenance Mix”, with the appropriate use of each to be dictated by a maintenance strategy properly linked to ERM. Parts of this linkage are normally established through an engineering practice known as Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), but comprehensive linkage to the ERM process has not been routinely to the degree which will be increasingly required. PM procedures are normally setup to be performed based on the passage of time, some sort of meter-based utilization record (such as miles driven) or a combination of the two. PM procedures must often be performed as part of a manufacturers warranty requirements or to meet external regulator agency requirements. While PM is expected to slowly decline in favor of CBM, it is still critical for systems which rely on it and it is often to easy to miss a PM that is required by utilization. PM, CBM and CM are often interrelated when a PM procedure is setup to trigger an inspection route work order which may subsequently result in either a CM or CBM activity. Proper integration with the controls and/or plant data historian environment enables the usage information to be captured for automatic PM triggering. The EAM system must be able to compare the newly proposed PM event to any pre-existing events to avoid generating multiple work orders for the same requested activity, but the individual request must enable a linkage with an audit trail from each requesting system (Agent). Information to Be Exchanged: In order to allow PM activities which are usage-based to be triggered at the appropriate time without manual entering of readings and to assist ORM systems which have usage logic included in their diagnostics/prognostics, then there is a need to automatically transfer usage readings captured on certain equipment from the Historian system to the EAM system (for PM-triggering) and ORM systems (for CBM-triggering). Scenarios Activated: #10, #11, #25, and #27 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #7 § § Open Automatic or Semi-Automatic CBM Triggering: The benefits of Use Case #7 § § Open Automatic or Semi-Automatic CBM Triggering: The benefits of interoperability start to pay significant dividends when the near-real time decision support systems (such as ORM) begin to properly interact with the transaction processing oriented business systems (such as EAM) based on data/information feeds from true real-time systems involved in monitoring and control. While it is fairly easy to show a hierarchy of data/information/knowledge on a Power. Point slide, the nature of the use cases needs to be fully contemplated when the transforms are taking place as part of the systems interaction scenarios. This involves several categories of systems spanning 3 basic layers (real-time, near real-time and transaction processing) in the interoperability stack and they are normally provided by several communities of solutions providers, with multiple vendors in each community. Providing sustainable interoperability for all of these systems of systems is a critical focalpoint for open standards based interoperability. This use case does NOT assume interaction with operations planning and scheduling oriented systems. It is limited to the current practice where specialized maintenance, reliability, quality and safety systems are able to diagnose or prognoses a need for a maintenance action. When an ORM system (PSMS< AHMS, QMS, EMS) determines that a maintenance action is required; it must be able to generate a CBM-driven request for action/work advisories using an open interface to an EAM system. The ORM should be smart enough to check beforehand to see if similar maintenance work entries are outstanding on an asset so as not to "flood" an EAM system with the exact same CBM request for action/work. In addition, the ORM system needs to be able to check the status of the work submitted. Information to Be Exchanged: All information required to generate a CBM request for action/work. Scenarios Activated: #12, #13, #14, #25, #26, #27, and #28 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #8 § § Open Early Warning Notifications: As we attempt to move Use Case #8 § § Open Early Warning Notifications: As we attempt to move from a purely reactive world to a world where we optimize overall operations, all of the various systems must be able to provide each other with some degree of early notifications about impending situations which will require an optimal decision to be made. If optimal operations are to be achieved, a fully informed dialog needs to take place between all of the participating systems and personnel as they make optimization decisions in support of a previously agreed upon definition of optimum for a particular organization, which may be established using tools such as balanced scorecards. This use case contemplates the situation where an Operational Performance Modeling & Optimization (OPM) system is receiving early warning notifications from a variety of systems which are contributing inputs to the overall optimization effort. The objective is to avoid the “collisions” which routinely occur in planning and scheduling meetings. While this case focuses on the maintenance and reliability oriented systems, equal attention must be played to all of the operational planning and scheduling systems. The OPM can then be used to generate a unified O&M schedule that is optimized according to agreed upon metrics and that should be the basis for any discussion about further optimization (or deviations). Information to Be Exchanged: OPM systems (Operational Performance Modeling & Optimization Systems) and enterprise portals (PORT) need to be guaranteed immediate notification of ORM significant actual and early warning ORM events and KPI's. In addition, Portals need guaranteed delivery of KPI's from OPM, ORM, EAM, DCS, HMI, and HIST systems. Scenarios Activated: #15, #16, #17, #18, #19, #20, #21, #22, #25, #26, #27, and #28 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Use Case #9 § § § Incident Management: With the increasing emphasis on risk Use Case #9 § § § Incident Management: With the increasing emphasis on risk management topics including Operational Risks and Health, Safety and Environmental risks, better incident management methods must be established. While traditional incident management systems relied on somewhat arbitrary (and frequently manual) methods to declare, capture, escalate and respond to various categories of incidents, a more systemic approach enables a substantially improved approach to risk management. Post mortem analysis shows that in many cases, a catastrophic event is proceeded by a series of improperly captured and escalated incidents. When the catastrophe occurs, management often responds by indicating they were unaware of the situation in spite of prior related incidents. In response, regulatory agencies such as OSHA are communicating their intent to hold management increasingly accountable (including criminal prosecution) for future catastrophes with ignorance to not be an excuse. In order to enable management to be properly aware of these incidents (in addition to the other risk indicators flowing in association with use case 8), industry must make sure that critical information is captured and escalated along the lines of accountability. An automated approach offers the greatest assurance of such a flow by eliminating unnecessary gaps in the process. This will also properly support the forthcoming requirements to capture, track and report “near-miss” incidents. Information to Be Exchanged: Enterprise Risk Management Systems must be guaranteed delivery of actual and near miss incidents as they are declared and captured at the lowest practical level in the data/information “food chain”. They can then escalate and manage the incidents bases upon previously defined rules. Scenarios Activated: #19, #20, #25, #26, #27, and #28 Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Systems Requiring Interoperability Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Systems Requiring Interoperability Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Systems Requiring Interoperability With Abbreviations § § § § § AHM: Asset Health Management Systems Requiring Interoperability With Abbreviations § § § § § AHM: Asset Health Management System CMS: Condition Monitoring System DCS: Distributed Control System DEV: Instrumentation & Control Device Monitoring System EAM: Enterprise Asset Management (Maintenance Management) System EH&S: Environmental, Health, and Safety Management System EIS: Engineering Information System (Plant/Process Engineering As-Designed & As-Built Network/Segment/Tag Information, Configuration Management Historian) EOM: Event-Oriented Message Bus ERM: Enterprise Risk Management System HIST: Process/Asset Data Historian System HMI: Human-Machine Interface (Operator Console) System MES: Manufacturing Execution System / Production Forecasting & Scheduling System OPM: Operational Performance Modeling & Optimization System ORM: Operational Risk Management System such as EH&S, PSM, AHM, QMS PDM: Product Data Management (As-Designed Product/Part Model Identification and Data Sheets, As-Built Asset identification and Data Sheets) PORT: Enterprise KPI/Event Portal PSM: Process Safety Management System QMS: Quality Management System REG: As-Installed & Maintained Plant/Process Nework/Segment/Asset/Tag Registry & Configuration Management Historian System Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Scenarios (Complete View) Open Standards Which Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Scenarios (Complete View) Open Standards Which Define Data Content for Information Exchange: OAGIS, CIDX ISO 15926 & MIMOSA NOTE: Arrows with Do Not Connect Directly to Another System Publish Information Which Can Be Subscribed to By Multiple Systems B 2 MML & PRODML MIMOSA & B 2 MML MIMOSA OPC Fieldbus (Foundation, Profibus, etc. ) Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) Enterprise Risk Management System, Enterprise Resource Planning System & RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) Enterprise Risk Management System, Enterprise Resource Planning System & Enterprise KPI/Event Portals ERM ERP RFQ Cost/Delivery Schedule & PO Delivery Status (OAGIS, CIDX) Plant/Process Engineering As-Designed & As-Built Network/Segment/Tag Information, Config. Mgmt. Historians EIS OPM KPIs (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) Detailed Prod. Schedules (B 2 MML) ORM KPIs (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) DCS HMI CBO Advisories Op. Work Status & Work History (MIMOSA) Control/SCADA, HMI, & Historians HIST Control Data (Fieldbus) MES (MIMOSA) Usage Readings (MIMOSA) Planned Asset Unavailability Schedule (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) Significant Actual & Early Warning ORM Events (MIMOSA) ORM Operational Risk Management Systems CBM Advisories (MIMOSA) (EH&S, PSMS, AHMS, QMS) Full-resolution Condition Data & Events (MIMOSA) Current Op. Data & Events (OPC UA DA/A&E) EOM Event-Oriented Message Bus Asset Performance Prediction (B 2 MML & PRODML) Operational Performance OPM Modeling & Optimization Systems Detailed Prod. Performance (B 2 MML) Product/Part Engineering Change Advisories Forecasted Demand (B 2 MML & PRODML) RFQ Cost/Delivery Schedule & PO Delivery Status (OAGIS, CIDX) MES KPIs (B 2 MML) Production Forecasting & Scheduling Systems “As-Designed” & “As-Built” Product/Part Data (ISO 15926 & MIMOSA) Hist. Op. Data & Events (OPC UA-HDA) PORT EAM Enterprise Asset Management Systems CBM/Calib. Schedule (MIMOSA) “As-Installed” & “As -Maintained” Master Maintenance Data (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) Work Status, & Work History (MIMOSA) Maint. KPIs (MIMOSA) CBM/Calib. Work Completed (MIMOSA) Asset Removals & Installations (MIMOSA) Measurements, Events, Inspections, Calibrations, Conditions, Usage, and Sensed O&M Actions CMS O&M Event Monitoring DEV I&C Device Monitoring Portable Monitors (Off& On-line) Online Surveillance Monitors Online Protection Monitors Online Transient Monitors Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) “As-Designed” & “As-Built” Plant/Process Engineering Data (ISO 15926 & MIMOSA) Plant/Process Engineering Change Advisories Copyright 2008 MIMOSA REG Plant/Process “As-Installed” & “As-Maintained” Network/Segment/Asset/Tag Registry & Configuration Management Historians OEM Product Data Mgmt. Systems PDM Production Performance (B 2 MML) Production Orders (OAGIS, CIDX, B 2 MML) RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) Customers Suppliers Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Scenarios

Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios As Determined By Top-Priority Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios As Determined By Top-Priority Use Cases Open Standards Which Define Data Content for Information Exchange: OAGIS, CIDX ISO 15926 & MIMOSA NOTE: Arrows with Do Not Connect Directly to Another System Publish Information Which Can Be Subscribed to By Multiple Systems B 2 MML & PRODML MIMOSA & B 2 MML MIMOSA OPC Fieldbus (Foundation, Profibus, etc. ) Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) RFQ Cost/Delivery Schedule & PO Delivery Status (OAGIS, CIDX) RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) RFQ Cost/Delivery Schedule & PO Delivery Status (OAGIS, CIDX) Plant/Process Engineering As-Designed & As-Built Segment/Tag Information, Configuration Management Historians EIS 1 2 3 23 ERM ERP “As-Designed” & “As. Built” Product/Part Data (ISO 15926 & MIMOSA) 28 Op. Work Status & Work History (MIMOSA) OPM KPIs (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) 21 ORM Risk KPIs (MIMOSA & 17 B 2 MML) DCS HMI CBO Advisories Control/SCADA, HMI, & Historians HIST Forecasted Demand (B 2 MML 22 & PRODML) (MIMOSA) 10 11 Usage Readings (MIMOSA) 18 MES ORM Operational Risk Management Systems CBM Advisories (MIMOSA) 12 (EH&S, PSMS, AHMS, QMS) 25 26 Full-resolution Condition Data & Events (MIMOSA) Current Op. Data & Events (OPC UA DA/A&E) EOM REG Event-Oriented Message Bus Asset Performance Prediction (B 2 MML & PRODML) 7 Planned Asset Unavailability Schedule (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) Significant Actual & Early 20 Warning ORM Events (MIMOSA) 19 RFQ Cost/Delivery Schedule & PO Delivery Status (OAGIS, CIDX) MES KPIs (B 2 MML) Operational Performance OPM Modeling & Optimization Systems Detailed Prod. Performance (B 2 MML) Detailed Prod. Schedules (B 2 MML) Control Data (Fieldbus) PORT Production Forecasting & Scheduling Systems Product/Part Engineering Change Advisories Hist. Op. Data & Events (OPC UA-HDA) 27 Production Performance (B 2 MML) Production Orders (OAGIS, CIDX, B 2 MML) RFQs & POs (OAGIS, CIDX) EAM Enterprise Asset Management Systems CBM/Calib. Schedule (MIMOSA) 8 “As-Installed” & “As -Maintained” Master Maintenance Data (MIMOSA & B 2 MML) Work Status, & Work History (MIMOSA) 13 14 15 9 16 Maint. KPIs (MIMOSA) CBM/Calib. Work Completed (MIMOSA) Asset Removals & Installations (MIMOSA) Measurements, Events, Inspections, Calibrations, Conditions, Usage, and Sensed O&M Actions CMS O&M Event Monitoring DEV I&C Device Monitoring Portable Monitors (Off& On-line) Online Surveillance Monitors Online Protection Monitors Online Transient Monitors Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) “As-Designed” & “As-Built” Plant/Process Engineering Data (ISO 15926 & MIMOSA) 24 Plant/Process Engineering Change Advisories Copyright 2008 MIMOSA 4 5 6 Plant/Process “As-Installed” & “As-Maintained” Segment/Asset/Tag Registry & Configuration Management Historians OEM Product Data Mgmt. Systems PDM Enterprise Risk Management System, Enterprise Resource Planning System & Enterprise KPI/Event Portals Customers Suppliers Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios

Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios 1 Pull Model Data Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios 1 Pull Model Data Out of PDM to ERM, ERP, PORT, ORM, EAM, EIS, REG, CMS, HMI, HIST 2 Synch Creation/Update of Model Data Out of PDM to ERM, ERP, ORM, EAM, EIS, REG, CMS, HIST 3 Push Model Data Into PDM from ERM, ERP, PORT, ORM, EAM, EIS, REG, CMS, HMI, HIST 4 Pull As-Designed Plant/Process Engineering Network/Segment/Tag Data Out of EIS to REG 5 Synch Creation/Update of As-Designed Process Engineering Network/Segment/Tag Data Out of EIS to REG 6 Push Asset Removal/Installation into REG from CMS 7 Pull Registry Data Out of REG to ERM, ERP, PORT, ORM, EAM, HMI, HIST, OPM, MES, CMS 8 Synch Creation/Update of Registry Data Out of REG to ERM, ERP, EIS, ORM, EAM, HIST, OPM, MES, CMS 9 Push Registry Data Into REG from ERM, ERP, ORM, EAM, HMI, HIST, OPM, MES, CMS 10 Pull Usage Readings Out of HIST to EAM, ORM 11 Synch Creation/Update of Usage Readings Out of HIST to EAM, ORM 12 Push CBM Advisories into EAM from ORM 13 Pull Maintenance Work Status/Work History Out of EAM to ORM, HMI, OPM 14 Synch Creation/Update of Maintenance Work Status/Work History Out of EAM to ORM, HMI, OPM 15 Pull EAM KPIs Out of EAM to PORT, ORM, OPM 16 Synch Creation/Update of EAM KPIs Out of EAM to PORT, ORM, OPM 17 Pull ORM KPIs Out of ORM to ERM, PORT, OPM 18 Synch Creation/Update of ORM KPIs Out of ORM to ERM, PORT, OPM 19 Pull Significant ORM Events Out of ORM to ERM, PORT, OPM 20 Synch Creation/Update of Significant ORM Events Out of ORM to ERM, PORT, OPM 21 Pull OPM KPIs Out of OPM to ERM, PORT, MES 22 Synch Creation/Update of OPM KPIs Out of OPM to ERM, PORT, MES 23 Synch Product/Part Engineering Change Advisories Out of PDM to ORM, REG 24 Synch Plant/Process Change Advisories Out of EIS to ORM, REG

Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios 25 (OPC UA) Pull Oil & Gas/Petro. Chem Industry Open. O&M Interoperability Top-Priority Scenarios 25 (OPC UA) Pull Current Operating Data and Events Out of CMS to ORM, OPM, HMI, HIST 26 (OPC UA) Synch Current Operating Data and Events Out of CMS to ORM, OPM, HMI, HIST 27 (OPC UA) Pull Historical Operating Data and Events Out of HIST to ORM, OPM 28 (OPC UA) Pull Historical Operating Data and Events Out of HIST to ORM, OPM

Scenarios Activated by Use Cases Scenarios Activated by Use Cases

Top-Priority Scenarios Sequence Diagrams Copyright 2008 MIMOSA Top-Priority Scenarios Sequence Diagrams Copyright 2008 MIMOSA

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