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Non-Immigrants International Student and Scholar Services Non-Immigrants International Student and Scholar Services

International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) Contact Information PHONE: 215 -204 -7708 www. temple. International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) Contact Information PHONE: 215 -204 -7708 www. temple. edu/isss Staff Information: – Martyn J. Miller, Ph. D. , Interim Assistant Vice President, International Affairs [email protected] edu; 1 -4682 O-1 s (Extraordinary Ability or Achievement) – Joan Mc. Ginley, Interim Director, ISSS • [email protected] edu; 11 -1272 2 Answers questions when Primary isn’t available – Sharon Loughran, Immigration Services Specialist • [email protected] edu; 1 -3805 H-1 Bs, J-1 Scholars & Student Interns, TNs, E-3 s

 U. S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS): DHS combined 22 different federal departments U. S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS): DHS combined 22 different federal departments and agencies into a unified, integrated cabinet agency in 2002 www. dhs. gov/ US Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS): Branch of DHS which has authority over all aliens in the US www. uscis. gov US Department of Labor (DOL): Government Agency that has authority over Labor Condition Application (LCA) needed for H-1 B and O-1 Petitions /E-3 Visa www. dol. gov US Customs and Border Protection (CBP): Branch of DHS responsible for admitting internationals into the US www. cbp. gov US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): enforces federal laws governing border control, customs, trade and immigration to promote homeland security and public safety; oversees SEVIS, the software system used for F and J students/scholars https: //www. ice. gov/ US Department of State – Authority over issuances of all US nonimmigrant and immigrant visas http: //travel. state. gov/content/visas/english. html

Application Process Please ensure that all required materials are submitted in ISD at one Application Process Please ensure that all required materials are submitted in ISD at one time (checks should be sent separately for H-1 B applications) Missing information will cause unnecessary delays in processing of immigration documents KNOW YOUR DATES! Make sure that they are the dates that you really want. Check with all parties involved: PI/Faculty Mentor/Supervisor, International Applicant, etc www. temple. edu/isss/international/index. html

ISSS DOES NOT DECIDE JOB TITLE / POSITIONS Please note that ISSS does not ISSS DOES NOT DECIDE JOB TITLE / POSITIONS Please note that ISSS does not determine job titles (paid/unpaid) or salaries. We are the final stage in facilitating the appropriate visa classification once the department has determined these factors and a prospective employee has been identified. Departments need to work with their HR Generalist, the Postdoctoral Affairs Office and the Senior Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Faculty Affairs to determine the job title

Know the answers to these questions before contacting ISSS: Is applicant currently in the Know the answers to these questions before contacting ISSS: Is applicant currently in the US? If yes, is s/he already employed by TU? If so, what is the foreign national's immigration status? Current job title? What Is the Highest Degree the Applicant Holds? Does Applicant Meet Minimum Degree Requirement for position? Does Applicant Have the Minimum number of years of experience required? REALISTIC Expected Start Date of appointment? How long will you employ applicant? On a yearly basis? Permanently? Foreign national's country of citizenship? Has the potential employee applied for a Green card? Does the applicant plan to travel abroad in the near future? (This will affect both visa timing and procedure)

 Identifying nonimmigrant documents Four types of documents are generally associated with nonimmigrant status: Identifying nonimmigrant documents Four types of documents are generally associated with nonimmigrant status: Passports Visas Enabling documents [I-20, DS-2019, LCA, I-797 Approval] I-94 cards [www. cbp. gov/i 94]

General Non-Immigrant Process Pre-entry includes visa processing at a U. S. consulate as well General Non-Immigrant Process Pre-entry includes visa processing at a U. S. consulate as well as any other preliminary steps that occur in the US relating to the planned nonimmigrant activity. Some examples of other preliminary steps are: Admission to a school and issuance of a SEVIS I-20 Acceptance by an exchange visitor program and issuance of a SEVIS DS-2019 A U. S. employer securing the approval of an employmentbased nonimmigrant worker petition (Form I-129) Obtaining a Visa Stamp from a US Consulate Outside the US Entry includes inspection and admission to the United States by an immigration inspector. Some key entry steps are: Office of Biometric Identity Management processing Namecheck clearances Review and processing of status eligibility documents Issuance of Form I-94

General Non-Immigrant Process (con’t) Status includes compliance with the terms and conditions of the General Non-Immigrant Process (con’t) Status includes compliance with the terms and conditions of the particular nonimmigrant category in which the nonimmigrant was admitted. Some key maintenance of status steps are: Complying with deadlines and reporting requirements Engaging in required activity Avoiding prohibited activity Exit includes satisfactory departure from the United States when the nonimmigrant activity is completed. Some key exit steps are: Departing the United States before the period of authorized admission has expired Complying with any applicable exit procedures

Presumption of Immigrant Intent Every alien (other than a nonimmigrant described in subparagraph (H)(i) Presumption of Immigrant Intent Every alien (other than a nonimmigrant described in subparagraph (H)(i) or (L) of Section 101(a)(15)) shall be presumed to be an immigrant until he establishes to the satisfaction of the consular officer, at the time of application for a visa, and the immigration officers, at the time of application for admission, that he is entitled to a nonimmigrant status under 101(a)(15).

The way to prove you do not have immigrant intent is to prove that The way to prove you do not have immigrant intent is to prove that you do qualify for a nonimmigrant classification. Nonimmigrant must: • Have an Un-abandoned residence abroad • Be entitled to a particular nonimmigration classification • Be admissible to the US [long list of reasons someone might be “Inadmissible” like criminal records or contagious diseases]

Nonimmigrant Status Nonimmigrant status is a legal condition, not a physical thing. It is Nonimmigrant Status Nonimmigrant status is a legal condition, not a physical thing. It is also dynamic, not static, which means that a person's nonimmigrant status must be acquired and maintained, and can be changed or lost. In many respects, nonimmigrant status is a relationship with the U. S. immigration system, with actions, events, and data in the "real" world contributing to the acquisition, maintenance, change, or loss of the nonimmigrant relationship. These actions, events, and data are often recorded and presented in relation to one another in the form of: Documents, including immigration documents Electronic records, stored in a database. Like documents, there can be electronic immigration records, such as SEVIS, CLAIMS 3, NIIS, ADIS, US-VISIT, CCD, and IBIS, just to name a few, and electronic ancillary records, such as a school's student database, an institution's HR database, etc.

Passports Most aliens seeking admission to the US in nonimmigrant status must have a Passports Most aliens seeking admission to the US in nonimmigrant status must have a valid passport or they are ineligible for admission. A passport permits bearer to return to the issuing country, usually the country of the bearer's nationality. Passport must be valid for a minimum of six months from the date of the expiration of the initial period of the alien's contemplated initial period of stay.

Enabling Documents Enabling documents include documents like an I-20 (issued by a designated school Enabling Documents Enabling documents include documents like an I-20 (issued by a designated school authorized to enroll F-1 students) or DS-2019 (issued by a designated J-1 exchange visitor program). An enabling document serves different purposes: To evidence the parameters of an alien's nonimmigrant status; To evidence eligibility to receive a nonimmigrant visa or be admitted to the U. S. in a nonimmigrant status; To implement changes or updates to a nonimmigrant's status once they hold a status. Some enabling documents (like an I-20 or DS-2019) are issued directly to an alien by an individual authorized to issue them. Other enabling documents, such as Form I-797, are issued by USCIS only after USCIS has adjudicated and approved an official petition that was filed on the alien's behalf by a U. S. employer.

VISA Stamp Issued by a Consular Officer (US Department of State) Only VISA Stamp Issued by a Consular Officer (US Department of State) Only "used" when an alien presents her/himself to an immigration inspecting officer when applying for admission to the US. Once the alien is admitted to the US, the visa ceases to have a function until the next time the alien enters the US. Can expire while the nonimmigrant is inside the U. S. , with no negative effect on the person's nonimmigrant status. Must be valid for if individual departs the US and wishes to return. If the visa has expired, the individual must obtain a new visa at a U. S. consular office before re-entering. If an individual is admitted to the U. S. on the basis of one visa, and then changes status to another nonimmigrant status while still in the U. S. , the only thing that has changed is the person's nonimmigrant status, not the person's visa stamp. If a person travels outside the U. S. after a change of status, he or she will have to obtain a new visa in the new category in order to be readmitted to the U. S. in the new status.

Visa stamps Visa cost, validity, and the number of entries allowed on a particular Visa stamps Visa cost, validity, and the number of entries allowed on a particular visa are determined by a policy of reciprocity between the US and another country Cost, validity period, and number of entries differ from country to country and from visa category to visa category. You can find out what the visa fees, period of validity, and number of entries will be by consulting the DOS Visa Reciprocity tables but note that the website is not always accurate. A visa is not required for Canadian citizens to enter the United States in any nonimmigrant category except E, K, S, and V categories. http: //travel. state. gov/content/visas/english/fees/re ciprocity-by-country. html

Visa Security Clearances Fingerprint Checks - Screen a visa applicant's fingerprints against DHS' Automated Visa Security Clearances Fingerprint Checks - Screen a visa applicant's fingerprints against DHS' Automated Biometric Identification System (IDENT) and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) Facial Recognition Checks - Use facial recognition technology to screen the photographs of all visa applicants against FBI watchlists as well as against the photos contained in DOS' Consular Consolidated Database (CCD). CLASS Namecheck - Check the names of all visa applicants against the Consular Lookout and Support System (CLASS) database. CLASS contains information on persons found ineligible for visas, or against whom potentially derogatory information exists. Almost 70 percent of CLASS records come from other agencies. CCD checks - Visa applicant's data is screened against the visa applicant data in the Consular Consolidated Database. Enterprise Case Assessment Service checks - this platform stores fraudrelated research. Post information gathering - Collect information from all sources relevant to making their decision. This includes getting information directly from the visa applicant through application forms, supporting documentation, and personal interviews. When another post may have information affecting the applicant's visa eligibility the post considering the visa application may have to obtain information from the other post in order to complete the clearance process. Advisory Opinions (AOs) - from the Department of State on questions of law and policy. Security Advisory Opinions (SAOs) - through the Department of State regarding security and related grounds.

Security Name Checks Special clearance procedures may be required if the consular officer has Security Name Checks Special clearance procedures may be required if the consular officer has reason to believe that an individual may be inadmissible under INA § 212(a)(3), which establishes a basis for inadmissibility relating to "Security and Related Grounds. " These grounds include activities such as espionage, terrorism, export of sensitive technology, and other activities that have been determined to affect the security of the US. If a consular officer knows, or has reasonable grounds to believe, that an alien falls under INA § 212(a)(3), a visa will not be issued. "security advisory opinion" (SAO) process is a multi. The agency review that collects additional information on applicants to provide a recommendation to posts to issue or refuse a visa. SAOs are mandatory for some categories of visa applicants. In some situations, an SAO is mandatory; in others, the consular officer has the discretion to request an SAO.

Mantis and Export Control Clearances Inquiry and clearance procedures relating to the INA § Mantis and Export Control Clearances Inquiry and clearance procedures relating to the INA § 212(a)(3)(A)(i)(II) ground of inadmissibility (concerning prohibited export from the US of goods, technology, or sensitive information) are guided by a DOS policy called Mantis. The mantis program was developed due to law enforcement/ intelligence community concern that U. S. produced goods and information are vulnerable to theft. . . The primary program security objectives are: -To stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missile delivery systems; -Restrain the development of destabilizing conventional military capabilities in certain regions of the world; -Prevent the transfer of arms and sensitive dual-use items to terrorist states; -And maintain U. S. advantages in certain militarily critical technologies. " A Mantis clearance might be requested for a national of any country who may come within the purview of INA § 212(a)(3)(A)(i)(II), and the decision to request a Mantis clearance is often in the discretion of the consular officer.

Technology Alert List (TAL) Cases involving fields on the Technology Alert List (TAL) usually Technology Alert List (TAL) Cases involving fields on the Technology Alert List (TAL) usually require a Mantis Security Advisory Opinion before a visa is issued. The most recent version of the TAL is not available to the public. Here are the fifteen categories included on the "critical fields list" in the last public version of the TAL before it was designated as "sensitive but unclassified. " This list is provided as background only as the actual current TAL may now be quite different: Conventional Munitions Nuclear Technology Rocket Systems Rocket System and Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) Subsystems Navigation, Avionics and Flight Control Usable in Rocket Systems and Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) Chemical, Biotechnology and Biomedical Engineering Remote Sensing, Imaging and Reconnaissance Advanced Computer/Microelectronic Technology Materials Technology Information Security Laser and Directed Energy Systems Technology Sensors and Sensor Technology Marine Technology Robotics Urban Planning

Inspection at US Port of Entry (POE) Individuals seeking admission to the US must Inspection at US Port of Entry (POE) Individuals seeking admission to the US must be inspected in person by an immigration officer at an official U. S. port of entry (POE). Before inspection, arriving aliens are seen as "applicants for admission. ” The first level of inspection is called primary inspection which consists of a brief interview by a CBP immigration inspector [Customs and Border Protection], who also examines the alien's immigration documents and supporting documents, and conducts other standard procedures. The inspector will ask what the alien's purpose is in coming to the US, look to see that the passport is valid and belongs to the holder, ensure that the visa is valid, appropriate, and belongs to the holder, and assess whether the supporting documents are valid, appropriate, and belong to the holder. The immigration inspector will also query government databases. If all is in order, the immigration inspector will conduct OBIM biometric data collection, and then admit the alien to the United States. Primary inspections are usually fairly quick, lasting not much more than a couple of minutes.

Secondary Inspection If there is a lookout that needs to be resolved, or if Secondary Inspection If there is a lookout that needs to be resolved, or if the inspector wants to have documents examined more carefully, needs to ask for help on a particular inspection, or needs to have a person's SEVIS record checked, the inspector may place the individual in a higher level of inspection called secondary inspection. This can take the form of the inspector asking the person to wait in a separate area until the inspector can complete the inspection. At larger ports of entry, secondary inspection takes place in a separate room with additional inspectors. Arriving aliens may find secondary inspection somewhat anxiety-producing, and it may take significantly longer than primary inspection. Travelers should be advised to travel with complete documentation appropriate for their immigration classification, and to leave sufficient time for connecting flights or airport pickups to accommodate the possibility of secondary inspection.

Admission to the US Nonimmigrants are admitted to the United States either until a Admission to the US Nonimmigrants are admitted to the United States either until a specific date ("date certain"), or for duration of status ("D/S"). For most nonimmigrants, the expiration of the period of authorized stay is recorded on Form I-94 (paper or electronic). Such an I-94 is said to be "date certain. " Generally speaking, that date is the date by which the individual must either leave the United States or have applied for an extension or change of status. Aliens should be encouraged to examine the date expiration date stamped on their I-94 each time they enter the US to avoid inadvertently staying beyond their period of authorized admission.

I-94 Document Form I-94 is a card on which DHS records important information about I-94 Document Form I-94 is a card on which DHS records important information about a particular admission of an alien to the US, such as the category the person has been admitted in and the duration of the person's stay. Enabling documents and Form I-94 are like "snapshots in time" reflecting particular aspects of a person's status at the time of the documents' creation or amendment. For instance, someone entered as an F-1 student but changed to J-1 status…an I-94 may reflect F-1 status but the individual now holds J-1 status and will receive a new I-94 documenting J-1 status upon departure and reentry into the US