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Mc. Kinney-Vento School Access and Stability under the Mc. Kinney-Vento Act Richard Wesler Regional Mc. Kinney-Vento School Access and Stability under the Mc. Kinney-Vento Act Richard Wesler Regional Director rwesler@moesc. org 732 -695 -7800 x 7805

Get to Know NCHE… • NCHE operates the U. S. Department of Education’s technical Get to Know NCHE… • NCHE operates the U. S. Department of Education’s technical assistance center for the federal Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) Program – – – Website: www. serve. org/nche Webinars: www. serve. org/nche/web/group. php Helpline: 800 -308 -2145 or homeless@serve. org Listserv: www. serve. org/nche/listserv. php Products: www. serve. org/nche/products. php • Handouts: www. serve. org/nche/web/mv 101 pt 1. php

Today’s Goals • Become familiar with important Mc. Kinney. Vento Act concepts, including: – Today’s Goals • Become familiar with important Mc. Kinney. Vento Act concepts, including: – The role of the local liaison – Student eligibility – School selection – Enrollment – Transportation – Dispute resolution – Title 1 Eligibility and Resources – Lessons Learned from Litigation -Engage in discussion and Q&A -Scenarios

Mc. Kinney-Vento Reauthorization • The education subtitle of the Mc. Kinney-Vento Act was reauthorized Mc. Kinney-Vento Reauthorization • The education subtitle of the Mc. Kinney-Vento Act was reauthorized by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in December 2015 • Mc. Kinney-Vento amendments go into effect on October 1, 2016, with the exception of the removal of “awaiting foster care placement” from the definition of homeless • For more information, visit www. serve. org/nche/legis/essa. php

The Mc. Kinney-Vento Act • Subtitle VII-B of the Mc. Kinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act The Mc. Kinney-Vento Act • Subtitle VII-B of the Mc. Kinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U. S. C. § 11431 et seq. ) • Establishes the definition of homeless used by schools • Ensures that children and youth experiencing homelessness have immediate and equal access to public education • Provides for educational access, stability, and support to promote school success • Needed to address the unique barriers faced by many homeless students

Local Liaisons • Every school district must designate an appropriate staff person to serve Local Liaisons • Every school district must designate an appropriate staff person to serve as the local homeless education liaison; may be the coordinator for other federal programs • Local liaisons serve as the key homeless education contact for the school district • Local liaisons play a critical role in the implementation of the Mc. Kinney-Vento Act

Local Liaison Responsibilities • Identifying homeless children and youth • Ensuring that homeless students Local Liaison Responsibilities • Identifying homeless children and youth • Ensuring that homeless students can enroll immediately and participate fully in school • Informing parents, guardians, and youth of educational rights • Ensuring the public posting of educational rights throughout the school district and community

Local Liaison Responsibilities • Ensuring that disputes are resolved promptly • Supporting unaccompanied homeless Local Liaison Responsibilities • Ensuring that disputes are resolved promptly • Supporting unaccompanied homeless youth in school selection and dispute resolution • Collaborating with other district programs and community agencies • Linking homeless students with other services, as needed

Mc. Kinney-Vento Eligibility • Children or youth who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate Mc. Kinney-Vento Eligibility • Children or youth who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, including: – Sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason – Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations – Living in emergency or transitional shelters

Mc. Kinney-Vento Eligibility – Awaiting foster care placement** – Living in a public or Mc. Kinney-Vento Eligibility – Awaiting foster care placement** – Living in a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings – Living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings – Migratory children living in the above circumstances – Unaccompanied youth living in the above circumstances **Phasing out of the definition of homeless as a result of ESSA amendments to Mc. Kinney-Vento

Fixed, Regular, and Adequate • Fixed: – Stationary, permanent, not subject to change • Fixed, Regular, and Adequate • Fixed: – Stationary, permanent, not subject to change • Regular: – Used on a predictable, routine, consistent basis – Consider the relative permanence • Adequate: – Lawfully and reasonably sufficient – Sufficient for meeting the physical and psychological needs typically met in a home environment Can the student go to the SAME PLACE (fixed) EVERY NIGHT (regular) to sleep in a SAFE AND SUFFICIENT SPACE (adequate)?

Shared Housing • Legislative wording: “sharing the housing of other persons due to loss Shared Housing • Legislative wording: “sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason” • Considerations: – Why did the parties move in together? Due to a crisis or by mutual choice as a plan for mutual benefit? – How permanent is the living arrangement intended to be? – Where would the party in crisis live if not sharing housing? – Is the living arrangement fixed, regular, and adequate?

Important Eligibility Considerations • Reference the legislative wording • Make determinations on a case-by-case Important Eligibility Considerations • Reference the legislative wording • Make determinations on a case-by-case basis based on the circumstances of each child • Understand that some cases will be clear-cut; others will require further inquiry and a more nuanced analysis • Use fixed, regular, and adequate as guiding principles • Remember that the list of living arrangements included in the law describes common homeless situations, but is not exhaustive

School Selection • Students experiencing homelessness may attend either: – The local attendance area School Selection • Students experiencing homelessness may attend either: – The local attendance area school: • Any public school that students living in the same attendance area are eligible to attend – The school of residence: • The school the child or youth attended when permanently housed; or • The school in which the child or youth was last enrolled

School Selection • Best interest: Keep homeless students in their schools of origin, unless School Selection • Best interest: Keep homeless students in their schools of origin, unless this is against the parent’s or guardian’s wishes • A school selection decision must occur; ideally, the parents/guardians/youth and school agree; if not, the dispute resolution process may be used • The placement determination should be a studentcentered, individualized determination in the best interest of the child

Best Interest Considerations* • The age of the child or youth • The distance Best Interest Considerations* • The age of the child or youth • The distance of a commute and the impact it may have on the student’s education • Personal safety issues • A student’s need for special instruction (e. g. , special education and related services, AP classes, sports, etc) • The length of anticipated stay in a temporary shelter or other temporary location • The time remaining in the school year *Question I- I(4), U. S. Department of Education Guidance Google: Non Regulatory Guidance July 27, 2016

School Selection • Students may continue attending the school of residence the entire time School Selection • Students may continue attending the school of residence the entire time they are homeless, and until the end of any school year in which they move into permanent housing • Students who become homeless in between school years may continue attending the school of residence for the following school year

School Selection • There is no time limit or distance limit placed on school School Selection • There is no time limit or distance limit placed on school of residence transportation; consider the unique situation of the student and how the transportation will affect the student’s education

Enrollment • States and districts must develop, review, and revise policies to remove barriers Enrollment • States and districts must develop, review, and revise policies to remove barriers to the school enrollment and continuing attendance of homeless children and youth • Mc. Kinney-Vento defines enrollment as attending classes and participating fully in school activities • The Mc. Kinney-Vento Act (federal law) supersedes state or local law or policy when there is a conflict (U. S. Constitution, Article VI)

Enrollment • Homeless children and youth have the right to enroll in school immediately, Enrollment • Homeless children and youth have the right to enroll in school immediately, even if lacking documentation normally required for enrollment • If a child or youth needs to obtain immunizations, or immunization or medical records, the enrolling school must refer the parent or guardian immediately to the local liaison, who must assist in obtaining necessary immunizations, or immunization or medical records; the school must continue the child’s enrollment in the meantime • Actual attendance may be delayed according to Commissioner Hespe’s letter dated August 26, 2014. Contact your school nurse for advice

Transportation • School districts must provide the following transportation for Mc. Kinney-Vento students: – Transportation • School districts must provide the following transportation for Mc. Kinney-Vento students: – Transportation to and from the school of residence (on parental request even if the district does not bus other pupils; Q J-6 July 27, 2016 USDOE guidance July 27, 2016 – Comparable transportation • Based on the best interest of the student and in consultation with the parent, the district ultimately determines the mode of transportation.

School of Residence Transportation NJAC 6 A: 27 -6. 2 (a), (b), (c) • School of Residence Transportation NJAC 6 A: 27 -6. 2 (a), (b), (c) • (a) When a homeless child attends a school in a school district other than his or her district of residence, the school district in which the child is enrolled shall provide transportation services and the district of residence shall pay… • (b) When a homeless child attends school in his or her district of residence, the district of residence shall provide transportation services • (c)When a homeless attends school in his or her district of residence while temporarily residing in another school district, the district of residence shall provide for transportation to and from school

Transportation • Districts should use a team approach in developing transportation policies and procedures; Transportation • Districts should use a team approach in developing transportation policies and procedures; the team should include the transportation director, local liaison, neighboring school districts, and service providers, as appropriate • Districts may consider other safe transportation options besides school busses, in keeping with state and local pupil transportation guidelines • Consult with pupil transportation directors about transportation options

Dispute Resolution • If a disagreement occurs, the district must: – Provide a written Dispute Resolution • If a disagreement occurs, the district must: – Provide a written explanation of its decision, including the right to appeal the decision – Refer the parent/guardian/youth to the local liaison, who will carry out the dispute resolution process as expeditiously as possible • Unaccompanied homeless youth have the same right to dispute as parents/guardians

Dispute Resolution • While the dispute is in process, students must be: – Enrolled Dispute Resolution • While the dispute is in process, students must be: – Enrolled immediately in the school in which enrollment is sought – Provided with school of residence transportation, if requested – Provided with all services for which they are eligible

Dispute Resolution • Liaisons should familiarize themselves with NJAC 6 A: 17 -2. 7 Dispute Resolution • Liaisons should familiarize themselves with NJAC 6 A: 17 -2. 7 which is the NJDOE Mc. Kinney-Vento dispute policy. It details specific steps for how disputes are mediated • Documentation should be kept for all local liaison interventions, not just formal disputes

Title 1 Eligibility and Resources • Homeless children and youth are : • Automatically Title 1 Eligibility and Resources • Homeless children and youth are : • Automatically eligible for Part A services and may be served under schoolwide or targeted assistance programs • Eligible to receive Part A services for the remainder of any school year in which they become permanently housed • Eligible to receive Part A services, even if not attending a Title 1 school, through the Part A homeless reserve set-aside

Serving Homeless Students Under Schoolwide Programs • Needs Assessment • Needs of homeless students Serving Homeless Students Under Schoolwide Programs • Needs Assessment • Needs of homeless students

Serving Homeless Students Under Targeted Assistance Schools • Targeted assistance schools provide services to Serving Homeless Students Under Targeted Assistance Schools • Targeted assistance schools provide services to a select group of at-risk children Failing Or MOST AT RISK OF FAILING to meet academic standards

Serving Homeless Students in Targeted Assistance Schools • Targeted assistance schools provide services to Serving Homeless Students in Targeted Assistance Schools • Targeted assistance schools provide services to a select group of at-risk children Programming may include: - Extended learning time for students -Professional development for school personnel -Parent involvement activities -Health, nutrition, and other social services -Basic medical equipment

Title 1, Part A District Plans • Districts must submit a Title 1, Part Title 1, Part A District Plans • Districts must submit a Title 1, Part A plan that: -Demonstrates coordination with the Mc. Kinney-Vento program -Includes a description of the services to be provided to homeless children -Collaboration is designed to: -Increase program effectiveness -Eliminate duplication -Reduce fragmentation of the instructional program

Title 1, Part A Eligibility Negative effects of Poverty + Turmoil caused by HOMELESSNESS Title 1, Part A Eligibility Negative effects of Poverty + Turmoil caused by HOMELESSNESS

Title 1, Part A Eligibility Significant risk of Academic failure Title 1, Part A Eligibility Significant risk of Academic failure

Serving Homeless Students with the Title , Part A Set aside • Districts must Serving Homeless Students with the Title , Part A Set aside • Districts must set aside funds: • - To be used to serve homeless children not attending Title 1 schools • To provide services comparable to those provided to children attending Title 1 schools • Districts may provide homeless students with services that are not ordinarily provided to other Title 1 students and not available from other sources

Determining a Set-aside Amount • Once students needs are identified, the amount of funds Determining a Set-aside Amount • Once students needs are identified, the amount of funds necessary to provide services should be determined • Title 1 services provided to homeless students may need to be greater in scope and intensity or different in nature than those normally provided to non- homeless students • NJ has decided that $250 will be multiplied times the number of homeless students in the district’s homeless count to fund the homeless reserve set-aside fund

Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds • Districts may use set-aside funds to provide educationally Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds • Districts may use set-aside funds to provide educationally related support services to children in shelters and other locations Funds must be used: - To provide services that are reasonable and necessary to assist students in taking advantage of educational opportunities - As a last resort when funds or services are not reasonably available from other sources

Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds • Acceptable uses include: -Items of clothing -Clothing and Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds • Acceptable uses include: -Items of clothing -Clothing and shoes for P. E. -Student fees -School supplies –backpacks, notebooks -Birth certificates -Immunizations -Food -Medical and dental services -Eyeglasses and hearing aide

Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds -Counseling services -Outreach services -Extended learning time -Tutoring services; Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds -Counseling services -Outreach services -Extended learning time -Tutoring services; at shelters and other locations including before, during, and after school, Saturday classes, summer school -Parental involvement -Fees for AP and IB testing Fees for SAT and ACT testing - GED testing for school-age students

Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds -Transportation to after school tutoring, parent-teacher night -Transportation formerly Acceptable Uses of Set-aside Funds -Transportation to after school tutoring, parent-teacher night -Transportation formerly homeless pupils permanently housed in order to complete the academic year in the school of residence • These are examples – Not an exhaustive list

Prohibited Uses of Set-aside Funds • • • Parent’s rent Parent’s utilities bills Clothing Prohibited Uses of Set-aside Funds • • • Parent’s rent Parent’s utilities bills Clothing for parent Graduation cap, gown, ring Yearbook fees etc

Suggestions for Collaboration • District Homeless Liaisons and District Title 1 Coordinators should meet Suggestions for Collaboration • District Homeless Liaisons and District Title 1 Coordinators should meet regularly during the school year and for grant development and identify and plan for the needs of homeless students

Free Meals • Homeless Children and Unaccompanied Youth are categorically eligible for free meals Free Meals • Homeless Children and Unaccompanied Youth are categorically eligible for free meals • Documentation is the child’s or youth’s name and the Homeless Liaison’s signature with the date of eligibility • Homeless pupils do not have to complete the federal free lunch application

District Monitoring ESSA requires that school districts be monitored for compliance with the Mc. District Monitoring ESSA requires that school districts be monitored for compliance with the Mc. Kinney-Vento law

Questions and Answers • • Q&A Scenario review NJ Family Crisis Law NJ Terrorism Questions and Answers • • Q&A Scenario review NJ Family Crisis Law NJ Terrorism Law

Homeless Scenarios • • • Homeless DCP& P 365 Day Rule Special Needs ( Homeless Scenarios • • • Homeless DCP& P 365 Day Rule Special Needs ( IDEA) NJ Family Crisis Law NJ Terrorism Law

Thank You Richard Wesler rwesler@moesc. org 732 -695 -7800 x 7805 Thank You Richard Wesler rwesler@moesc. org 732 -695 -7800 x 7805