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Low-molecular biologic compounds Lecture #3 Low-molecular biologic compounds Lecture #3

Table of contents • ARENES AND AROMATICITY • THE STABILITY OF BENZENE • SUBSTITUTED Table of contents • ARENES AND AROMATICITY • THE STABILITY OF BENZENE • SUBSTITUTED DERIVATIVES OF BENZENE AND THEIR NOMENCLATURE • POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS • PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ARENES • REACTIONS OF ARENES • HUCKEL’S RULE • HETEROCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS

ARENES AND AROMATICITY • Arenes are hydrocarbons based on the benzene ring as a ARENES AND AROMATICITY • Arenes are hydrocarbons based on the benzene ring as a structural unit. Benzene, toluene, and naphthalene, for example, arenes.

 • Arenes are also referred to as aromatic hydrocarbons. Used in this sense, • Arenes are also referred to as aromatic hydrocarbons. Used in this sense, the word aromatic has nothing to do with odor but means instead that arenes are much more stable as conjugated trienes. • The classification of hydrocarbons as aliphatic or aromatic took place in the 1860 s when it was already apparent that there was something special about benzene, toluene, and their derivatives. Their molecular formulas (benzene is C 6 H 6, toluene is C 7 H 8) indicate that, like alkenes and alkynes, they are unsaturated and should undergo addition reactions. Under conditions in which bromine, for example, reacts rapidly with alkenes and alkynes, however, benzene proved to be inert. Benzene does react with Br 2 in the presence of iron(III) bromide as a catalyst, but even then addition isn't observed. Substitution occurs instead!

 • Benzene is not cyclohexatriene, nor is it a pair of rapidly equilibrating • Benzene is not cyclohexatriene, nor is it a pair of rapidly equilibrating cyclohexatriene isomers. Benzene is planar and its carbon skeleton has the shape of a regular hexagon.

KEKULIE’ STRUCTURE OF BENZENE ROBINSON’ STRUCTURE OF BENZENE KEKULIE’ STRUCTURE OF BENZENE ROBINSON’ STRUCTURE OF BENZENE "aromatic sextet“the six delocalized π electrons of the three double bonds.

 • All the carbon-carbon bonds are the same length (140 pm) and the • All the carbon-carbon bonds are the same length (140 pm) and the 120 degrees bond angles correspond to perfect sp 2 hybridization. Interestingly, the 140 -pm bond distances in ben- zene are exactly midway between the typical sp 2 -sp 2 single-bond distance of 146 pm and the sp 2 -sp 2 double-bond distance of 134 pm.

THE STABILITY OF BENZENE • Hydrogenation of benzene and other arenes is more difficult THE STABILITY OF BENZENE • Hydrogenation of benzene and other arenes is more difficult than hydrogenation of alkenes and alkynes. Two of the more active catalysts are rhodium and platinum, and it is possible to hydrogenate arenes in the presence of these catalysts at room temperature and modest pressure. Benzene consumes three molar equivalents of hydrogen to give cyclohexane.

The framework of bonds shown in the tube model of benzene are σ bonds. The framework of bonds shown in the tube model of benzene are σ bonds. Each carbon is sp 2 - hybridized and has a 2 p orbital perpendicular to the σ framework. Overlap of the 2 p orbitals generates a π system encompassing the entire ring. Electrostatic potential map of benzene - the red area in the center corresponds to the region above and below the plane of the ring where the π electrons are concentrated.

SUBSTITUTED DERIVATIVES OF BENZENE AND THEIR NOMENCLATURE • All compounds that contain a benzene SUBSTITUTED DERIVATIVES OF BENZENE AND THEIR NOMENCLATURE • All compounds that contain a benzene ring are aromatic, and substituted derivatives of benzene make up the largest class of aromatic compounds. Many such compounds are named by attaching the name of the substituent as a prefix to benzene.

 • The prefix ortho signifies a 1, 2 -disubstituted benzene ring, meta signifies • The prefix ortho signifies a 1, 2 -disubstituted benzene ring, meta signifies 1, 3 -disubstitution, and para signifies 1, 4 disubstitution. The prefixes o, m, and p can be used when a substance is named as a benzene derivative or when a specific base name.

POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS Naphthalene is bicyclic (has two rings), and its two benzene rings POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS Naphthalene is bicyclic (has two rings), and its two benzene rings share a common side. Anthracene and phenanthrene are both tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

 • A large number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are known. Many have been • A large number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are known. Many have been synthesized in the laboratory, and several of the others are products of combustion. Benzo[a]pyrene, for example, is present in tobacco smoke, contaminates food cooked on barbecue grills, and collects in the soot of chimneys. Benzo[a]pyrene is a carcinogen (a cancer-causing substance). It is converted in the liver to an epoxy diol that can induce mutations leading to the uncontrolled growth of certain cells.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ARENES • In general, arenes resemble other hydrocarbons in their physical PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ARENES • In general, arenes resemble other hydrocarbons in their physical properties. They are nonpolar, insoluble in water, and less dense than water. • At one time, benzene was widely used as a solvent. This use virtually disappeared when statistical studies revealed an increased incidence of leukemia among workers exposed to atmospheric levels of benzene as low as 1 ppm. Toluene has replaced benzene as an inexpensive organic solvent because it has similar solvent properties but has not been determined to be carcinogenic in the cell systems and at the dose levels that benzene is.

REACTIONS OF ARENES 1. One mode of chemical reactivity involves the ring itself as REACTIONS OF ARENES 1. One mode of chemical reactivity involves the ring itself as a functional group and includes Reduction Electrophilic aromatic substitution. 2. The second family of reactions are those in which the aryl group acts as a substituent and affects the reactivity of a functional unit to which it is attached.

THE BIRCH REDUCTION THE BIRCH REDUCTION

FREE-RADICAL HALOGENATION OF ALKYLBENZENES FREE-RADICAL HALOGENATION OF ALKYLBENZENES

CHLORINATION OF TOLUENE CHLORINATION OF TOLUENE

OXIDATION OF ALKYLBENZENES OXIDATION OF ALKYLBENZENES

NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION IN BENZYLIC HALIDES NUCLEOPHILIC SUBSTITUTION IN BENZYLIC HALIDES

HUCKEL’S RULE • By limiting his analysis to monocyclic conjugated polyenes and restricting the HUCKEL’S RULE • By limiting his analysis to monocyclic conjugated polyenes and restricting the structures to planar geometries, Huckel found that whether a hydrocarbon of this type was aromatic depended on its number of π electrons. • Among planar, monocyclic, fully conjugated polyenes, only those possessing (4 n + 2) π electrons, where n is a whole number, will have special stability; that is, be aromatic. • Thus for this group of hydrocarbons, those with (4 n + 2) = 6, 10, 14. . 'rr electrons will be aromatic. These values correspond to (4 n + 2) when n = 1, 2, 3. .

 • Benzene the six electrons of benzene are distributed in pairs among its • Benzene the six electrons of benzene are distributed in pairs among its three bonding π MOs, giving a closed-shell electron configuration. All the bonding orbitals are filled, and all the electron spins are paired. • Cyclobutadiene - square cyclobutadiene has one bonding π MO, two equal-energy nonbonding π MOs and one antibonding π * MO. After the bonding MO is filled, the remaining two electrons are assigned to different nonbonding MOs in accordance with Huckel's rule. This results in a species with two unpaired electrons - a diradical. In a square geometry, cyclobutadiene lacks a closed-shell electron configuration. It is not stabilized and, with two unpaired electrons, should be very reactive. • Cyclooctatetraene - six of the eight π electrons of planar cyclooctatetraene occupy three bonding orbitals. The remaining two π electrons occupy, one each, the two equal-energy nonbonding orbitals. Planar cyclooctatetraene should, like square cyclo butadiene, be a diradical.

HETEROCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS • Cyclic compounds that contain at least one atom other than HETEROCYCLIC AROMATIC COMPOUNDS • Cyclic compounds that contain at least one atom other than carbon within their ring are called heterocyclic compounds, and those that possess aromatic stability are called heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Some representative heterocyclic aromatic compounds are pyridine, pyrrole, furan, and thiophene. Pyridine, pyrrole, and thiophene, like benzene, are present in coal tar. Hiickel's rule can be extended to heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Unshared electron pairs of the heteroatom may be used as π electrons as necessary to satisfy the 4 n + 2 rule.

PROBLEMS PROBLEMS