Скачать презентацию LONDON S STREETS LIME STREET Lime Street Скачать презентацию LONDON S STREETS LIME STREET Lime Street

Streets.pptx

  • Количество слайдов: 72

LONDON‘S STREETS LONDON‘S STREETS

LIME STREET LIME STREET

Lime Street - a street in London's City between Fancherch Street to the south Lime Street - a street in London's City between Fancherch Street to the south and Lidenholl Street to the north.

At Lime Street is the headquarters of world famous insurance market Lloyd's of London. At Lime Street is the headquarters of world famous insurance market Lloyd's of London. Architect Richard Rogers, one of the founders of high-tech style, the building gave the Lloyd's of London an unusual shape. The building served as a place for shooting the film "Mamma Mia!".

Close to Lime Street is another notable building is the architect Norman Foster - Close to Lime Street is another notable building is the architect Norman Foster - Mary Axe skyscraper, named for its unusual form of "cucumber".

PALL MALL PALL MALL

Pall Mall is a street in the City of Westminster, London, and parallel to Pall Mall is a street in the City of Westminster, London, and parallel to The Mall, from St. James's Street across Waterloo Place to the Haymarket; while Pall Mall East continues into Trafalgar Square. The street is a major thoroughfare in the St James's area of London, and a section of the regional A 4 road. The name of the street is derived from "pall mall", a mallet-and-ball game that was played there during the 17 th century. Pall Mall is best known for being the home to various gentlemen's clubs built in the 19 th and early 20 th centuries. These include the Athenaeum, Travellers Club, Army and Navy Club, Reform Club, United Service Club (now occupied by the Institute of Directors), Oxford and Cambridge Club and Royal Automobile Club.

It was also once the centre of the fine art scene in London; in It was also once the centre of the fine art scene in London; in 1814 the Royal Academy, the National Gallery and Christie's auction house were all here, but none of them stayed for long. The freehold of nearly all of the southern side of the Pall Mall has belonged to the crown for several hundred years, and is still owned by the Crown Estate. St. James's Palace is on the south side of the street at the western end. Marlborough House, which was once a royal residence, is next to it to the east, opening off a courtyard just to the south of the street.

The Prince Regent's Carlton House once stood at the eastern end of the street. The Prince Regent's Carlton House once stood at the eastern end of the street. Pall Mall was also once the home of the War Office, with which it became synonymous (just as Whitehall refers to the administrative centre of the UK government). The War Office was based in a complex of buildings based on the ducal mansion of Cumberland House which was designed by Matthew Brettingham and Robert Adam.

There were at least two other architecturally important ducal residences in the street, Schomberg There were at least two other architecturally important ducal residences in the street, Schomberg House, and Buckingham House, the London residence of the Dukes of Buckingham and Chandos which was rebuilt for them by Sir John Soane (not to be confused with the Buckingham House which became Buckingham Palace). Buckingham House was demolished in 1908 to make way for the Royal Automobile Club. The former branch of the Midland Bank in Pall Mall was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. Pall Mall is also a destination on the English version of the Monopoly (game) Board.

BIRDCAGE WALK BIRDCAGE WALK

Birdcage Walk is a street in London, United Kingdom, in the City of Westminster. Birdcage Walk is a street in London, United Kingdom, in the City of Westminster. It runs eastwest as a continuation of Great George Street, from the crossroads with Horse Guards Road and Storey's Gate, with the Treasury building and the Institution of Mechanical Engineers on the north east corner, to a junction with Buckingham Gate, at the southeast corner of Buckingham Palace. St. James's Park lies to the north, whilst to the south are the backs of buildings on Old Queen Street, Queen Anne's Gate and Petty France, and, at the western end, the Wellington Barracks of the Brigade of Guards

The street is named after the Royal Menagerie and Aviary which were located there The street is named after the Royal Menagerie and Aviary which were located there in the reign of King James I. King Charles II expanded the Aviary when the Park was laid out from 1660. Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn both mention visiting the Aviary in their diaries. [1][2] Storey's Gate, named after Edward Storey, Keeper of the Kings Birds at the time of Pepys, was originally the gate at the eastern end of Birdcage Walk: the name is now applied to the street leading from the eastern end to Westminster Abbey, which was formerly called Prince's Street.

Only the Royal Family and the Hereditary Grand Falconer, the Duke of St Albans, Only the Royal Family and the Hereditary Grand Falconer, the Duke of St Albans, were permitted to drive along the road until 1828, when it was opened to the public. By the mid-19 th Century, the walk had gained notoriety as a cruising ground for homosexual trysts. A new roundabout was built at the western end in 1903. Birdcage Walk is also the name of a march composed in 1951 by Arnold Steck. Birdcage Walk was also the name of a street in Bethnal Green, now called Columbia Road.

BAKER STREET BAKER STREET

Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster Baker Street is a street in the Marylebone district of the City of Westminster in London. It is named after builder William Baker, who laid the street out in the 18 th century. The street is most famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lives at a fictional 221 B Baker Street address. The area was originally high class residential, but now is mainly occupied by commercial premises. The street is served by the London Underground by Baker Street tube station, one of the world's oldest surviving underground stations. Next door is Transport for London's lost property office. A significant robbery of a branch of Lloyds Bank took place on Baker Street in 1971.

In 1835, the first permanent exhibition of Madame Tussauds waxworks was opened on Baker In 1835, the first permanent exhibition of Madame Tussauds waxworks was opened on Baker Street. The museum moved, just around the corner, to Marylebone Road in 1884. In 1940 the headquarters of the Special Operations Executive moved to 64 Baker Street, they were often called the "Baker Street Irregulars" after Sherlock Holmes' gang of street urchins of the same name. The Beatles' Apple Boutique was based at 94 Baker Street from 1967 to 1968.

For many years the head office of Marks and Spencer, formerly the UK's largest For many years the head office of Marks and Spencer, formerly the UK's largest retailer, was at "Michael House" (named in parallel with the group's "St Michael" brand), 55 Baker Street, until the company relocated to the Paddington Basin in 2004. This was one of the best known corporate buildings in the UK, and has since been redeveloped as a modern office complex by London & Regional Properties. British singer Dusty Springfield lived on Baker Street in the 1960 s.

In fiction, Sherlock Holmes, Gregory House, Basil the Great Mouse Detective, Sherlock Hound, Danger In fiction, Sherlock Holmes, Gregory House, Basil the Great Mouse Detective, Sherlock Hound, Danger Mouse, Sexton Blake, Carland Cross and James Black (Case Closed) have all resided along the road. "Baker Street" is a song by Gerry Rafferty, released in 1978. He also released an album entitled Baker Street. "Baker St. Muse" is a song from Jethro Tull's, album Minstrel in the Gallery, which was released in 1975. The 2008 film, The Bank Job was based on the 1971 robbery of Lloyds Bank in Baker Street. "Some Girls", a song by the English rock band The Rolling Stones, makes a reference to the street. Baker Street is one of a number of London landmarks named in the song "We Are London" by Madness on the album The Liberty of Norton Folgate.

OXFORD STREET OXFORD STREET

Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster in the West Oxford Street is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster in the West End of London, United Kingdom. It is Europe's busiest shopping street, and as of 2011 had approximately 300 shops. The length of the street is 2. 4 kilometers. It is the longest shopping street in Europe.

History It's commercial history starts when it was a main route for transporting prisoners History It's commercial history starts when it was a main route for transporting prisoners from Newgate prison who were to be hanged before a large crowd at the Tyburn Tree gallows, near to where Marble Arch stands today. The shopping thoroughfare was developed by the Earl of Oxford in 1782 as he bought land either side of the road and renamed it Oxford Street. 18 th century, many of the surrounding fields were purchased by the Earl of Oxford, and The area was developed. It became popular with entertainers including bear-baiters and masquerades. During the 19 th century, the area became known for its shops. Oxford Street suffered considerable bombing during the Second World War. During the night and early hours of 17 to 18 September 1940 the street suffered particularly heavy bombing, and many buildings were badly damaged or destroyed. In September 1973 a shopping-bag bomb was detonated by the Irish Republican Army at the offices on Oxford Street, injuring six people. A further bomb was detonated by the IRA on the

Shopping Oxford Street is home to a number of major department stores and numerous Shopping Oxford Street is home to a number of major department stores and numerous flagship stores. It is the biggest shopping street within Inner London. It is considered to be the most important, and forms part of a larger shopping district with Regent Street, Bond Street and a number of other smaller nearby streets. John Lewis, the third-largest department store in the UK and flagship of the John Lewis chain, opened in 1864. Marks & Spencer. largest Marks & Spencer store of 170, 000 square feet (16, 000 m 2) at the junction of Oxford Street and Orchard Street. Schuh, the largest shoe store on Oxford Street Selfridges, the second-largest department store in the UK, it has been on this site for over a century

Christmas lights Each Christmas Oxford Street is decorated with festive lights. The Christmas lights Christmas lights Each Christmas Oxford Street is decorated with festive lights. The Christmas lights began in 1959, five years after the neighbouring Regent Street began the tradition. In 1967, as recession hit London, the lights were stopped and only returned in 1978 when Oxford Street organised a laser display. In mid- to late-November a celebrity turns on the lights and they remain lit until 6 January (Twelfth Night). The following celebrities have turned on the lights since 1981

Transport links Oxford Street is served by the Central Line, Jubilee Line, Bakerloo Line, Transport links Oxford Street is served by the Central Line, Jubilee Line, Bakerloo Line, Northern Line and Victoria Line of the London Underground, as well as many major bus routes. Tube stations along Oxford Street, starting at Marble Arch :

Bond Street Bond Street

TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD

POTTERY LANE POTTERY LANE

Pottery Lane is a street in Notting Hill, west London. Today it forms part Pottery Lane is a street in Notting Hill, west London. Today it forms part of one of London's most fashionable and expensive neighbourhoods, but in the mid-19 th century it lay at the heart of a wretched and notorious slum known as the "Potteries and the Piggeries". The slum came to the attention of Londoners with the building of the Hippodrome in 1837 by entrepreneur John Whyte. Unfortunately for Whyte a public right of way existed over his land "dirty and dissolute vagabonds" from the nearby slum invaded his race-course, adding to his financial difficulties and, in part, leading to the closure of his venture in 1842. Pottery Lane gradually improved in the late 20 th century along with the rest of the Notting Hill area, and today the houses sell for seven figure sums. Just one of the original brick kilns still survives; it is located in Walmer road, just north of Pottery Lane, and bears a commemorative plaque placed there by the Royal Borough of Kensington

History Pottery Lane takes its name from the brick fields which lay at the History Pottery Lane takes its name from the brick fields which lay at the northern end of the street. According to the Victorian author and philanthropist Mary Bayly, the local soil was "almost entirely composed of stiff clay, peculiarly adapted for that purpose [brick making]", [1] and from the late 18 th century, high quality clay was dug here and used for brick making to supply the voracious appetite of London's growing suburbs. Bricks and tiles were stored in sheds lining Pottery Lane and were fired in large kilns - one of which, on Walmer Road, remains to this day. During the 19 th century the fields around London were built up with new housing. Commonly, a field would be excavated to expose the brickearth or London clay subsoil which was then turned into bricks on the site by moulding and firing them. The bricks would then be used to build houses adjacent to the brick field - transport was expensive. Once the building work was nearing completion the brick field would be leveled and built upon while a new brick field further out would supply the bricks.

Pottery Lane today Today the houses in Pottery lane sell for seven figure sums. Pottery Lane today Today the houses in Pottery lane sell for seven figure sums. Just one of the original brick kilns still survives; it is located in Walmer road, just north of Pottery Lane, and bears a commemorative plaque placed there by the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. "The Ocean" was filled and covered in 1892 and is now leafy Avondale Park.

BOND STREET BOND STREET

Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London that Bond Street is a major shopping street in the West End of London that runs northsouth through Mayfair between Oxford Street and Piccadilly. It has been a fashionable shopping street since the 18 th century and is currently the home of many high price fashion shops. The southern section is known as Old Bond Street, and the northern section, which is rather more than half the total length, is known as New Bond Street. This distinction, however, is not generally made in everyday usage. It is one of the most expensive strips of real estate in the world.

Bond Street takes its name from Sir Thomas Bond, the head of a syndicate Bond Street takes its name from Sir Thomas Bond, the head of a syndicate of developers who purchased a Piccadilly mansion. At that time the house backed onto open fields and the development of the various estates in Mayfair was just getting underway. It moved predominantly from south to north, which accounts for the southern part of the street being "Old" Bond Street, and the Northern half being "New" Bond Street, the latter being added in a second phase as London continued to grow. John Rocque's map of London published in 1746 shows the whole length of Bond Street and all its side streets fully built up.

Current streetscape Current streetscape

At one time Bond Street was best known for top end art dealers and At one time Bond Street was best known for top end art dealers and antique shops, clustered around the London office of Sotheby's auction house, which has been in Bond Street for over a hundred years, and of the Fine Art Society, present on the street since its foundation in 1876 The northern end of Old Bond Street, in particular, is also notable as one of the world’s greatest concentrations of outlets of upmarket jewellers, to the extent that presence on the strip may now be regarded as de rigueur for any brand wishing to proclaim the highest international standing.

Shops currently located on Bond Street include Armani, Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gabanna, Tiffany Shops currently located on Bond Street include Armani, Louis Vuitton, Dolce & Gabanna, Tiffany & Co. , Hermès, Polo Ralph Lauren, Chanel, Prada, Gucci, Burberry etc. Bond Street is mentioned in a number of works of literature, including Jane Austen's novel Sense and Sensibility and Virginia Woolf's 1925 novel Mrs Dalloway. It is also a square on the British Monopoly board, the same colour as Regent and Oxford Streets – green – and is the most expensive of the three. In 2010, Bond Street was Europe's most expensive retail location.

REGENT STREET REGENT STREET

Situated in the heart of London's West End, Regent Street is one of the Situated in the heart of London's West End, Regent Street is one of the capital's most famous thoroughfares. Home to more than 75 international flagship stores such as Liberty, Apple, Regent Street is London’s ultimate shopping and lifestyle destination. The street is one of the major shopping streets in London's West End, well known to tourists and Londoners alike, and famous for its Christmas illuminations. It is named after the Prince Regent. The street was completed in 1825 and was an early example of town planning in England, cutting through the 17 th and 18 th century street pattern through which it passes. It runs from the Regent's residence at Carlton House in St James's at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus and Oxford Circus, to All Souls Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place continue the route to Regent's Park. Every building in Regent Street is protected as a Listed Building. (placed on the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest), at least Grade II status, and together they form the Regent Street Conservation Area.

History Regent Street is one of the first planned developments of London. Originally, the History Regent Street is one of the first planned developments of London. Originally, the street was intended for commercial purposes and consequently did not need gardens or public spaces. By the end of the 19 th century, fashions in shopping had changed and the original buildings were unsuitable for their purpose. They were small and old fashioned, and consequently they were restricting trade. A limited number of architects were responsible for the design of the reconstructed Regent Street. The work was delayed by the Great War and it was not until 1927 that the completion was celebrated, with King George V and Queen Mary driving in state along its length.

Places of interest All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church. As well as Places of interest All Souls Church is an Anglican Evangelical church. As well as the core church membership, many hundreds of visitors come to All Souls, bringing the average number of those coming through the doors for services on Sundays to around 2, 500 every week. All Souls has an international congregation, with all ages represented.

Broadcasting House is the headquarters and registered office of the BBC. The building includes Broadcasting House is the headquarters and registered office of the BBC. The building includes the BBC Radio Theatre from where music and speech programmes are recorded in front of a studio audience. Several radio stations are also broadcasted from studios within the building.

Café Royal The Café Royal, located at 68 Regent Street in the Quadrant, opened Café Royal The Café Royal, located at 68 Regent Street in the Quadrant, opened in 1865 and became an institution of London high society. The present building, by Sir Reginald Blomfield, dates from 1928 and is grade 2 listed. The Café Royal closed in December 2008, as part of Crown Estate plans to redevelop this part of Regent Street.

The Liberty department store was originally known for its role at the retail end The Liberty department store was originally known for its role at the retail end of the Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts Movement styles. The shop opened in 1875 and sold ornaments, fabric and objects of art from Japan and the East. Liberty has a long history of artistic and inspiring collaborative projects – from William Morris and Gabriel Dante Rossetti in the nineteenth century to Yves Saint Laurent and Dame Vivienne Westwood in the twentieth.

Events There is a yearly Regent Street Festival when the street is closed to Events There is a yearly Regent Street Festival when the street is closed to traffic for the day.

The Christmas light displays are a London tradition dating since 1948, when the Regent The Christmas light displays are a London tradition dating since 1948, when the Regent Street Association decorated the street with Christmas trees. Lighting was not allowed until 1949, following lifting of wartime restrictions, and the first full lighting display was in 1953. There is a different display every year, switched on at an opening ceremony in the first week of November.

On 6 July 2004, half a million people crowded into Regent Street and the On 6 July 2004, half a million people crowded into Regent Street and the surrounding streets to watch a parade of Formula One cars.

PARK LANE PARK LANE

Location and Length Park Lane is a major road in the City of Westminster, Location and Length Park Lane is a major road in the City of Westminster, in Central London. Park Lane is about three quarters of a mile (1. 2 km) in length, and runs north from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch, along the length of the eastern flank of Hyde Park. To the east of the road is Mayfair. Park Lane was designated as one of the "free through routes", which allowed vehicles to cross the zone during its hours of operation without paying the charge;

History Originally a country lane running north-south along what is now the eastern boundary History Originally a country lane running north-south along what is now the eastern boundary of Hyde Park, it became a fashionable residential address from the eighteenth century onwards, offering both views across Hyde Park and a position at the most fashionable western edge of London. It became lined with some of the largest privately owned mansions in London, including the Duke of Westminster's Grosvenor House and the Holford family's Dorchester House (demolished in 1929 and replaced by 1931 with The Dorchester), which are now both hotels, and the Marquess of Londonderry's Londonderry House, which has been demolished. On a corner with Oxford Street, Somerset House (No. 40), built in 1769 -70, was successively the town house of Warren Hastings, a former Governor-General of India, the third Earl of Rosebery, and the Dukes of Somerset. In the 1960 s the Lane was widened to three lanes each way either side of a central reservation. This required the demolition of a number of houses at Hyde Park Corner which had previously formed a line east of Apsley House in Piccadilly. It also meant claiming land previously in Hyde Park to make room for the multilane carriageway. The result was substantially to diminish the appeal of Park Lane as a residential address, since it became one of the busiest and noisiest roads in central London, retaining little or none of the pastoral atmosphere that once made it popular. The widening of the road distanced the houses on the east side of Park Lane from Hyde Park itself, access to which is now by underpass.

INTERESTING FACTS The Animals in War Memorial is located on Park Lane at its INTERESTING FACTS The Animals in War Memorial is located on Park Lane at its junction with Upper Brook Street, on the eastern edge of Hyde Park in London, England, and was designed by leading English sculptor, David Backhouse. Unveiled on 24 November 2004 by the Princess Royal, it stands as a memorial to the countless animals that have served and died under British military command throughout history.

Cultural references Park Lane owes much of its fame to its being the second Cultural references Park Lane owes much of its fame to its being the second most valuable property in the London edition of Monopoly. It was at the zenith of its social status when the London version of the Monopoly board was first produced in 1936, and before it became a noisy multi-lane highway. On the board, Park Lane forms a pair with Mayfair, the most expensive property in the game. In real life, Park Lane marks the western boundary of Mayfair. 2007 car bomb On 29 June 2007, an IRA car bomb was defused in an underground car park on the street. The London Hilton on Park Lane was also subject to an IRA bomb planted in the hotel lobby on 5 September 1975 which killed 2 people.

POPULAR RESIDENCE Past 1 -Richard Sharp, known as POPULAR RESIDENCE Past 1 -Richard Sharp, known as "Conversation Sharp", merchant, critic, MP. This house was said to have been on the corner with Upper Grosvenor Street and later renumbered to be '23'. 2 -Benjamin Disraeli, prime minister 3 -Moses Montefiore, philanthropist 4 -Keith Clifford Hall, contact lens pioneer 5 -Aldford House: Dame Anna Neagle, actress 6 -Grosvenor House and Garden: Hugh Grosvenor, 1 st Duke of Westminster, richest man in England, race horse owner, philanthropist. 7 -Londonderry House: Charles Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7 th Marquess of Londonderry, cabinet minister and very wealthy Irish aristocrat 8 -Somerset House Warren Hastings and the 11 th and 12 th Dukes of Somerset Present 9 -Shirley Porter, Tesco heiress and Tory politician, set up home on Curzon Square in 2006 after 12 years of selfimposed exile in Israel 10 - Mohamed Al-Fayed, owner of Fulham F. C. , former owner of Harrods

HARLEY STREET HARLEY STREET

Harley Street is a street in the City of Westminster in London, England which Harley Street is a street in the City of Westminster in London, England which has been noted since the 19 th century for its large number of private specialists in medicine and surgery.

In the 19 th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in In the 19 th century, the number of doctors, hospitals, and medical organizations in and around Harley Street has greatly increased. Records show that there were around 20 doctors in 1860, 80 by 1900, and almost 200 by 1914. When the National Health Service was established in 1948, there were around 1, 500. Today, there are more than 3, 000 people employed in the Harley Street area, in clinics, medical and paramedical practices, and hospitals such as The London Clinic.

Land ownership Harley Street is owned by the de Walden family and managed by Land ownership Harley Street is owned by the de Walden family and managed by the de Walden Estate.

Arms of the Barons de Walden Arms of the Barons de Walden

Many famous people have lived or practised in Harley Street, including the Victorian prime Many famous people have lived or practised in Harley Street, including the Victorian prime minister William Ewart Gladstone, the artist J. M. W. Turner, and Lionel Logue, who successfully treated King George VI for his pronounced stuttering. Queen's College, founded in 1848 and one of the oldest girls' schools in England, is situated on Harley Street. William Ewart Gladstone Lionel Logue

PICCADIL LY PICCADIL LY

Piccadilly is a major street in central London, England, running from Hyde Park Corner Piccadilly is a major street in central London, England, running from Hyde Park Corner in the west to Piccadilly Circus in the east. It is completely within the city of Westminster.

Until the 17 th century the street was known as Portugal Street. The name Until the 17 th century the street was known as Portugal Street. The name Piccadilly may have arisen from a tailor named Robert Baker, who owned a shop on the Strand, in the late 16 th century and early 17 th century. He amassed a large fortune by making and selling piccadills (also called picadils or pickadils—stiff collars with scalloped edges and a broad lace or perforated border), that were then in fashion.

Some of the grandest mansions in London were built on the northern side of Some of the grandest mansions in London were built on the northern side of Piccadilly: Clarendon House (now the location of Albemarle Street), Berkeley House (later Devonshire House), and Sir John Denham's house (later Burlington House) were constructed in the 17 th century. Later mansions included Melbourne House (now The Albany), Apsley House, Bath House (home to the Barons Ashburton) and Cambridge House. Several members of the Rothschild family had mansions at the western end of the street, and that part of it was colloquially referred to as Rothschild Row. By the 1920 s most of these buildings had been demolished or were in institutional use. Piccadilly is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London.

In the 1881 comic opera Patience, the popular poetaster and fraud Bunthorne's means of In the 1881 comic opera Patience, the popular poetaster and fraud Bunthorne's means of publicizing himself is to walk down Piccadilly with a poppy or a lily in his medieval hand

The Piccadilly Line of the London Underground takes its name from Piccadilly and part The Piccadilly Line of the London Underground takes its name from Piccadilly and part of the line travels under Piccadilly. Green Park, Hyde Park Corner, and Piccadilly Circus tube stations all have entrances either in or near Piccadilly.

ABBEY ROAD ABBEY ROAD

On 8 th August 1969, at 11. 35 am, four men walked across a On 8 th August 1969, at 11. 35 am, four men walked across a zebra crossing in St John's Wood. Hardly an earth-shattering event, but since then millions of people have come to the very same crossing to imitate those four men.

Of course the four men in questions were The Beatles, and the crossing is Of course the four men in questions were The Beatles, and the crossing is in Abbey Road. The 'Fab Four' were posing for the photo that was to be used on their last album to recorded. Abbey Road has never been the same since.

Every day, fans from around the world come to the crossing to walk in Every day, fans from around the world come to the crossing to walk in the footsteps of their heroes and to see the studios where they recorded most of their songs.