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LITERACY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM St Mary’s RC High School LITERACY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM St Mary’s RC High School

WHAT IS LITERACY? Ø In simple terms literacy focuses on the key skill areas WHAT IS LITERACY? Ø In simple terms literacy focuses on the key skill areas of Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening. Ø The DFE White Paper perhaps puts it into context better: ‘When young people compete for jobs and enter the workplace, they will be expected to communicate precisely and effectively. ’ (Para. 4. 50). Ø There is a clear expectation that young people leaving the education system at 16, or more likely 19, will have the requisite literacy and communication skills to be employable and to be effective in that employment.

WHY? Ø The recently published Teaching Standards enshrine the expectation that all teachers will WHY? Ø The recently published Teaching Standards enshrine the expectation that all teachers will promote ‘high standards of literacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject’. Ø The government has signalled in the recent White Paper (para 2. 10) its intention to make the test of teachers’ literacy skills on entry to the profession both more challenging and to limit the number of times it can be taken. Ø It is clear that literacy within the primary curriculum and across the secondary curriculum will once again have enhanced status as part of the drive to raise literacy standards for all pupils, but particularly for those for whom literacy levels are below those expected for their age.

FROM OFSTED! Ø Although it is right that key literacy skills in reading, writing, FROM OFSTED! Ø Although it is right that key literacy skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening should be taught primarily in English lessons, there is a clear intention in recent government statements of policy for these skills to be reinforced and applied with accuracy across other subjects. This is particularly important for pupils who may be working below the levels expected for their age and who are finding it difficult to master basic elements of spelling, punctuation and grammar. For many, using fluent, clear and legible handwriting is also a problem.

FROM OFSTED! For example, pupils in a Key Stage 3 geography lesson were asked FROM OFSTED! For example, pupils in a Key Stage 3 geography lesson were asked to write a letter to persuade people to support the campaign to reduce logging in areas of rainforest. However, the teacher gave no guidance either on how to write the letter or how to write persuasively. No reference was made to any skills learnt in English. Ø In a Year 7 history lesson, pupils were given a short passage to read about King John and the Magna Carta. Pupils were given no guidance on the purpose of the reading. They were not directed to the questions that they would be expected to answer. The teacher did not mention any reading approach such as skimming or scanning Ø

LITERACY AT ST MARY’S Literacy at St Mary’s RC High School Literacy is a LITERACY AT ST MARY’S Literacy at St Mary’s RC High School Literacy is a whole school issue, affecting all subject areas and as it is a Governmentidentified national priority, all Departments must be aware of and actively seeking to implement the following:

LITERACY AT ST MARY’S Subject specific word banks with relevant vocabulary prominently displayed. Whole LITERACY AT ST MARY’S Subject specific word banks with relevant vocabulary prominently displayed. Whole school spelling policy to be applied by all staff. As far as possible, pupils should be responding to written questions with full-sentence answers. All staff to take equal responsibility for correction of spelling and punctuation errors; also for monitoring and correcting as appropriate the sense of written responses.

LITERACY AT ST MARY’S • All subject areas to maximise writing opportunities; incorporating extended LITERACY AT ST MARY’S • All subject areas to maximise writing opportunities; incorporating extended writing, writing for different audiences and purposes, and use of different forms of writing. • Teachers should take every opportunity to make learning outcomes explicit to pupils, highlighting literacy skills involved. • All teachers should be aware of their own use of spoken language for different purposes, audiences and situations, and equally should encourage pupils to use appropriate language themselves.

KS 3 SPELLING TEST GEOGRAPHY 1. Physical Geography 2. Environment 3. Weathering 4. Precipitation KS 3 SPELLING TEST GEOGRAPHY 1. Physical Geography 2. Environment 3. Weathering 4. Precipitation 5. Visibility 6. Temperature 7. Aspect 8. Atmosphere 9. Microclimate 10. Coast 11. Erosion 12. Transport 13. Deposition 14. Fetch 15. Attrition 16. Hydraulic Action 17. Corasion 18. Solution 19. Long Shore Drift 20. Population

MARKING FOR LITERACY Why mark for literacy? • To give feedback to pupils that MARKING FOR LITERACY Why mark for literacy? • To give feedback to pupils that will help them to improve their uses of literacy in all subjects • To motivate pupils to show their subject knowledge and understanding effectively • To monitor pupil progress in the use of language • To obtain feedback on literacy teaching

MARKING FOR LITERACY Marking for literacy: some key principles • Make marking criteria explicit MARKING FOR LITERACY Marking for literacy: some key principles • Make marking criteria explicit • Mark selectively • Prompt and praise – constructive advice and targets • Expect active involvement from pupils • Develop a consistent approach • Provide immediate feedback

MARKING FOR LITERACY Spelling: set clear expectations • When the children start to write, MARKING FOR LITERACY Spelling: set clear expectations • When the children start to write, remind them of the strategies, rules and conventions that they can apply. • Your expectations and marking reflect the children's cumulative knowledge. The marking does not go beyond what has been taught about spelling. • Ensure that the children know what the criteria for success are in this particular piece of work. For example, once they understand the rules for adding -ed to regular verbs, let them know you expect them to spell these words correctly.