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LEP SSI Updates June 5, 2006 Georgina K. González Director Bilingual / ESL Education LEP SSI Updates June 5, 2006 Georgina K. González Director Bilingual / ESL Education Susie Coultress Assistant Director Bilingual / ESL Education Adela Esquivel Assistant to the Directors Texas Education Agency Division of Curriculum 1

Limited English Proficient • Texas Education Code (TEC)§ 29. 052 defines… “Student of limited Limited English Proficient • Texas Education Code (TEC)§ 29. 052 defines… “Student of limited English proficiency (LEP) – a student whose primary language is other than English and whose English language skills are such that the student has difficulty performing ordinary class work in English. ” • The term English Language Learner (ELL) is used interchangeably with LEP. 2

Did you know. . . ? There a total of 711, 737 Identified English Did you know. . . ? There a total of 711, 737 Identified English Language Learners (ELLs) in Texas. PEIMS, Fall 2005 3

Texas Student Profile Grades Pre K - 12 2000 -2001 2004 -2005 1, 650, Texas Student Profile Grades Pre K - 12 2000 -2001 2004 -2005 1, 650, 560 (41%) Hispanics 1, 969, 097 (45%) 1, 713, 436 (42%) White 1, 660, 392 (38%) 586, 712 (14%) African Am. 623, 535 (14%) 12, 120 (0. 3%) Native Am. 14, 350 (0. 3%) PEIMS 4

Texas ELL Special Language Program Participation • • • ELLs Bilingual ESL ELL Parental Texas ELL Special Language Program Participation • • • ELLs Bilingual ESL ELL Parental Denials Not Served PEIMS Fall 2005 711, 737 376, 170 280, 660 46, 528 8, 379 5

Major Language Groups in Texas Schools Spanish 129 languages are represented in Texas schools Major Language Groups in Texas Schools Spanish 129 languages are represented in Texas schools 655, 074 Vietnamese 12, 300 Urdu 3, 476 Arabic 3, 093 Korean 2, 824 Mandarin Chinese 1, 910 PEIMS, Fall 2005 6

Number Of Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students Number of LEP Students School Year 2000 Number Of Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students Number of LEP Students School Year 2000 -01 2001 -02 2002 -03 2003 -04 2004 -05 2005 -06 570, 603 601, 791 630, 345 660, 707 684, 583 711, 737 PEIMS 7

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Texas Regions with Highest ELL Populations • • • Region IV Region I Region Texas Regions with Highest ELL Populations • • • Region IV Region I Region XIV (Houston) (Edinburg) (Dallas) (Ft. Worth) (El Paso) 181, 503 144, 371 119, 190 60, 104 50, 882 PEIMS 2005 -06 9

Identification of LEP Students To identify our LEP students the Texas Administrative Code (TAC Identification of LEP Students To identify our LEP students the Texas Administrative Code (TAC § 89. 1215) requires districts to include two specific questions in the home language survey presented to the parents of new incoming students to the districts: (1) "What language is spoken in your home most of the time? “ (2) "What language does your child (do you) speak most of the time? If a language other than English is written as a response then appropriate assessments are required. 10

List of Approved Tests for Identification of LEP Students May 1, 2006 the Committee List of Approved Tests for Identification of LEP Students May 1, 2006 the Committee convened to review publishers and approve a new list of tests for identification, placement and exit of Bilingual/ESL students. The updated list has been provided through the listserve. http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/taa/stanprog 05280 6. html 11

Legal Requirements When is a Bilingual Program required? • Each school district which has Legal Requirements When is a Bilingual Program required? • Each school district which has an enrollment of 20 or more limited English proficient students (LEP) of the same language classification in the same grade level district-wide shall offer a bilingual education program for LEP students in Pre-K to grade 5 • Grade 6 shall be included when clustered with the elementary grades TAC[§ 89. 1205 (a)] 12

Legal Requirements When is an English as a Second Language (ESL) program required? All Legal Requirements When is an English as a Second Language (ESL) program required? All LEP students for whom a district is not required to offer a Bilingual education program shall be provided an ESL program, regardless of the students’ grade levels and home Language, and regardless of the number of students. Texas Administrative Code (TAC) [§ 89. 1205 (d)] 13

Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) The Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) is responsible for: Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) The Language Proficiency Assessment Committee (LPAC) is responsible for: • Identifying • Processing • Annually reviewing • Exiting • Monitoring All ELL students on each campus 14

Updates to the LPAC Process Manual http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/ teares-lpac-processmanual. html Updates to the LPAC Process Manual http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/ teares-lpac-processmanual. html 15

Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language (ESL) Program Models Georgina González Director Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language (ESL) Program Models Georgina González Director of Bilingual Education Division of Curriculum Texas Education Agency March 6, 2006 http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/ Program. Models-revised 110304. ppt 16

News from the field of English Language Learners Research A large scale study has News from the field of English Language Learners Research A large scale study has been completed by Dr. Claude Goldenberg and Dr. Michael Kamil of California State University Their Preliminary report reflects the following: • Primary language instruction is very important for the academic success of second language learners • Vocabulary development is a critical factor in second language literacy • Parents with low literacy will increase their personal libraries when informed of the importance of reading and book availability for their children (American Association of Publishers October 2004 -Washington D. C. ) 17

Best Practice for English Language Learners • Integrated Language and Content Instruction • Lessons Best Practice for English Language Learners • Integrated Language and Content Instruction • Lessons and units that foster concept development, practice, and application • Building background knowledge by providing concrete experiences • Instruction that incorporates students’ cultures and language (Dr. Emma Violand-Sánchez, Supervisor English for Speakers of Other Languages & High Intensity Language Training Arlington Public Schools, Oct. 2004) 18

Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Spanish phonemic awareness, letter identification, and Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Spanish phonemic awareness, letter identification, and word reading measured in grade 2 were reliable predictors of English performance on parallel tasks at the end of grades 3 and 4 (The International Dyslexia Association quarterly newspaper August, Carlo, Calderon, and Proctor, Spring 2005) 19

Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Vocabulary-building activities that require students to Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Vocabulary-building activities that require students to interact meaningfully with words through writing, making personal and semantic connections, and that specifically teach word learning strategies appear to be the most promising pedagogies to increase reading comprehension. (The International Dyslexia Association quarterly newspaper August, Carlo, Calderon, and Proctor, Spring 2005) 20

Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • L 1 word reading skills transfer Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • L 1 word reading skills transfer to L 2, but children must have first language literacy in the skill for the transfer to take place; oral proficiency in the first language is not sufficient. • Vocabulary is an extremely important predictor of reading comprehension (The International Dyslexia Association quarterly newspaper August, Carlo, Calderon, and Proctor, Spring 2005) 21

Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Children instructed bilingually were able to Recent Literacy development findings in Spanish-speaking ELLs • Children instructed bilingually were able to achieve high levels of English and Spanish literacy. Adjusting for SES, they were at the 7. 2 grade level in Spanish Broad Reading and the 5. 8 grade level in English Broad Reading at the end of Grade 5. (The International Dyslexia Association quarterly newspaper August, Carlo, Calderon, and Proctor, Spring 2005) 22

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • Few David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • Few studies examine the benefits of teaching phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, oral reading fluency, reading comprehension, writing, or spelling • Few use experimental or quasi-experimental research designs to come to firm conclusions about effective practices for building literacy in language minority students. • This is very different than the research situation with L 1 students. – NRP identified 450 experimental/quasi-experimental studies of instruction with English-only students – NLP identified 17 such studies (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 23

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • In David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • In the aggregate, however, it appears that works with native-speaker populations generally works with English-language learners. • In fact, instruction that emphasizes literacy components confers a learning advantage to English language learners. • The effect sizes for such teaching tend to be in the moderate range, meaning that its benefits are large enough to be important. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 24

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • Effect David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overall Findings • Effect sizes for language minority students are lower and more variable than those for native-English speaking students, suggesting that such teaching is likely to be necessary but insufficient. • It is possible that combining high-quality instruction in the literacy components with adjustments that take into account student’s first and second language proficiency would lead to higher effect sizes. • Research is needed to test this hypothesis. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 25

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Issues for ELLs • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Issues for ELLs • Specific sounds and sound placement in words differ for different languages. • Phonological tasks with unknown words are more difficult. • For ELLs, unfamiliar phonemes and graphemes make decoding and spelling difficult. • For literate ELLs, English graphemes have different sounds in L 1. • Limited English proficiency prevents children from using word meaning to figure out how to read a word. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 26

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: NLP Phonemic Awareness and David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: NLP Phonemic Awareness and Phonics: Research • Findings are consistent with the very solid L 1 research findings-both phonemic awareness and phonics instruction confer clear benefits on children’s reading development. • There is no evidence that phonemic awareness and phonics instruction in English needs to be delayed until a certain threshold of English oral language proficiency is attained. • * Important to keep in mind issues raised in previous slide. • Helping students hear English sounds that don’t exist or are not salient in their home language is beneficial. Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 27 (

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Fluency: Issues for ELLS David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Fluency: Issues for ELLS • Fluency embraces both word recognition and comprehension. • ELLs often have less opportunity to read aloud in English with feedback. • There are too few studies of teaching oral reading fluency with ELLs to draw firm conclusions. • Fluency is an important factor in comprehension and comprehension training influences fluency. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 28

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Fluency: Research • Fluency David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Fluency: Research • Fluency training similarly benefits ELLs and English-speaking students. • Existing studies have used good English models and paired ELLs with proficient English readers. • Existing studies ensure students understand the text before they read it. • With good instruction, ELLs can meet the same benchmarks. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 29

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary: Issues/Strengths for ELLS David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary: Issues/Strengths for ELLS • ELLS arrive at school with a much more limited English vocabulary than English-speaking students. • There are many basic words that English-Speaking students know that ELLs do not. • ELLs may lack labels in English for concepts they know and have labels for in their first language. • ELLs and English speakers may have different concepts for the same label. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 30

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary: Issues/Strengths for ELLS David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary: Issues/Strengths for ELLS • There is some English vocabulary that may be especially important in comprehending connected text-cohesion markers for example—that necessitates explicit instruction. • Words with multiple meanings can be of a source of confusion. • ELLs literate in a first language that has many cognates with English have an important resource. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 31

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary Research: Summary • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Vocabulary Research: Summary • Very few empirical studies • Incidental earning improved vocabulary when the oral discourse is aligned with the visual images. Students need to have some English proficiency to benefit from its intervention. • Intentional learning improves vocabulary – Recurrent exposure to novel words, – Use in meaningful contexts, – Active processing of word meanings – Explicit word analysis • (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 32

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Comprehension: Issues for ELLs David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Comprehension: Issues for ELLs • Limited word recognition skills and fluency impede comprehension. • Limited vocabulary impedes comprehension. • Structural differences between languages can mislead ELLs. • Culturally unfamiliar text is more difficult to comprehend. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 33

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Comprehension Research: Summary • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Comprehension Research: Summary • Few empirical studies focused exclusively on comprehension and ELLs. • Too few studies to determine best ways to facilitate comprehension in ELLs • Unlike first language research, strategy instruction did not always help reading comprehension. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 34

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Examples of modifications to David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Examples of modifications to interventions based on research • Identify and clarify difficult words and passages – Pre-teach vocabulary – Paraphrase text to make it more comprehensible – Use children’s first language • Constantly monitor student’s comprehension – Ask lots of questions – Ask different levels of questions • Provide opportunities for students to practice L 2 – Story retells – Written responses (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 35

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Program of Research • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Program of Research • Oracy/Literacy Development of Spanish-Speaking Children (HD 39521; $17 M) • Biological and Behavioral Variation in the Language Development of Spanish-speaking Children (R 305 U 010001; $4 M • Jointly funded by – The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. – US DOE Institute of Education Sciences. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 36

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Project investigators • University David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Project investigators • University of Houston – D. Francis, C. Carlson, E. Hogan, P. Crino, H. Rivera • Cal-State – Long Beach – C. Goldenberg, L. Reese, B. Sanders • Southern Methodist – P. Mahree – Temple University • A. Iglesias • University of Texas-Austin. (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 37

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overview of Projects I. David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Overview of Projects I. III. IV. V. VII. Measurement Development Instruction Context Early Intervention/Prevention Classroom Language Functional Neuroimaging (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 38

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Central Theme: The Role David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Central Theme: The Role of Language in Literacy Development • • • Identify factors and conditions under which Spanish-speaking children develop proficient literacy skills in English and in Spanish Factors operating at different levels (child, classroom, family, school, community) account for variability in development of these skills Explication of this variability requires systematic measurement and analysis of these factors within and between these different levels (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 39

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Sampling Frame: Language of David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Sampling Frame: Language of Instruction • • Structured Immersion Predominantly English instruction from beginning of school Transitional: Early Exit Initially instruction in Spanish, with predominantly English instruction beginning after GI, but before G 4 Transitional: Late Exit Initially instruction in Spanish, with predominantly English instruction beginning after G 3 Dual Language Balance of English and Spanish language instruction is maintained at through elementary grades (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 40

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: School Selection Criteria • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: School Selection Criteria • • • 40%+ Hispanic/Latino 30%+ ELL in Kindergarten TEA/API Rating (Acceptable+/610+_ Language Programs: – Transition – Structured English Immersion – 2 -way (dual language)(maintenance) (dbe) 3 Regions (Urban TX; Border TX; Urban CA) (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 41

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Phonemic Awareness and Phonics: David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Phonemic Awareness and Phonics: Research and Instruction • • • A broad research base on native speakers of alphabetic languages shows that phonological awareness is important to acquisition of literacy in all alphabetic languages (Ziegler & Goswami, 2005). As mentioned, findings from the limited research on instruction with language minorities are consistent with the very solid L 1 research findings. Phonemic awareness and phonics instruction confer clear benefits on children’s reading development (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 42

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Basis for Research • David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Basis for Research • – – Research Questions: To what extent is phonological awareness a single construct across languages? To what extent is phonological awareness distinct from letter-word identification? Motivating Perspective: Relations among outcomes may reveal important insights, esp. across languages (multivariate) Education is a social phenomenon in which the context may have important implications, i. e. , classrooms may differ in important ways (multilevel) (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 43

David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Test of Phonological Processes David J. Francis National Reading Panel Research on Effective Instruction: Test of Phonological Processes in Spanish: TOPP-S • • • Sound Matching (Initial Sounds/Final Sounds) Blending Phonemes into Words Blending Phonemes into Non-words Phonemes Elision Segmenting Phonemes into Words Segmenting Phonemes into Non-words (Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics-Presentation on March 7, 2006 ) 44

Performance-Based Monitoring and Interventions June 1, 2006 45 Performance-Based Monitoring and Interventions June 1, 2006 45

2006 PBMAS Update • 2006 PBMAS – – – BE/ESL Indicators were previewed during 2006 PBMAS Update • 2006 PBMAS – – – BE/ESL Indicators were previewed during March TETN CTE Indicators also previewed during March TETN NCLB Indicators were previewed during April TETN SPED Indicators were previewed during May TETN Other System Components will be previewed today 2006 PBMAS Manual will be available during the summer 46

2006 PBMAS Preview Program PBMAS Area Componen t Other System Components Minimum size requirement 2006 PBMAS Preview Program PBMAS Area Componen t Other System Components Minimum size requirement (MSR) 2005 PBMAS Denominator equal to or greater than 30 Numerator of at least 5 for all dropout indicators. MSR can be met in current year or by aggregating numerators and denominators for most recent two years. 2006 PBMAS No change 47

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components PBMAS Component Availability of 3 years 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components PBMAS Component Availability of 3 years of data for some indicators 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS N/A—no indicators had more than 2 years of data (2004 and 2005) Three years of data will be considered when available in the following situations: 1) When MSR is met over two years; 2) In automated special analysis; and 3) In professional judgment special analysis. 48

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Special Analysis 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Special Analysis 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Automated and professional judgment special analysis available on certain indicators for group sizes of 15 -29 and 5 -14 over two years. Only change will be to consider three years of data when available. (See attached charts on Special Analysis Process Determination. ) 49

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Componen Area t Name 2005 PBMAS Other System Components TAKS 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Componen Area t Name 2005 PBMAS Other System Components TAKS Standards for TAKS passing rate indicators M=35% R/ELA=50% Sc=25% SS=50% W=50% Other System Components Standards for AYP M=42% Economically R/ELA=53% Disadvantaged Indicator (NCLB) Other System Components AMAO Standard for LEP Progress K-2 2006 PBMAS M=40% R/ELA=60% Sc=35% SS=60% W=60% No change N/A—AMAO not in 15% place 50

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Componen t Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Other System 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Componen t Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Other System Components AMAO Standard for LEP Progress Grades 3 -12 40% 42% Other System Components AMAO Standard 1. 5% for LEP Attainment K-2 2. 0% Other System Components AMAO Standard Method 1=25% for LEP Attainment Method 2=40% Grades 3 -12 Method 1=25. 5% Method 2=42% 51

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Component Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Other System Components 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Component Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Other System Components Standard for SPED N/A—was Report LEP Representation Only in 2004 and 2005 Same standards as other representation indicators (e. g. , African American and Hispanic) Other System Components Standard for NCLB Highly Qualified Indicator Still TBD but anticipate standards will be set and PL assigned. N/A—was Report Only in 2004 and 2005 52

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Standards for participation rate indicators: • LEP TAKS/SDAA II Participation • SPED TAKS Only Participation Rate • SPED SDAA II Only Participation Rate • SPED Statewide Assessment Exemption Rate • LEP TAKS/SDAA II Participation=RO • SPED TAKS Only Participation Rate=RO • SPED SDAA II Only Participation Rate=RO • SPED Statewide Assessment Exemption Rate=3. 0% and 8. 0% depending on ADA • LEP TAKS/SDAA II Participation=2004 Standard reinstated. • SPED TAKS Only Participation Rate=TBD • SPED SDAA II Only Participation Rate=TBD • SPED Statewide Assessment Exemption Rate=No Change 53

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name TAKS Grade 8 Science 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name TAKS Grade 8 Science 2005 PBMAS N/A 2006 PBMAS Students taking TAKS Grade 8 Science will be included in three of the participation rate indicators: • LEP TAKS/TAKSI/SDAA II Participation Rate • SPED TAKS Only Participation Rate • SPED TAKS/TAKS-I Only Participation Rate 54

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Component Area Name Other System Components TAKS-I 2005 PBMAS N/A 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Component Area Name Other System Components TAKS-I 2005 PBMAS N/A 2006 PBMAS Students taking TAKS-I will be included in two of the participation rate indicators: • LEP TAKS/TAKSI/SDAA II Participation Rate • SPED TAKS/TAKS-I Only Participation Rate 55

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Required Improvement (RI) 2005 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Required Improvement (RI) 2005 PBMAS Implemented as a pilot component 2006 PBMAS Continue RI and additional indicators for which it’s available. For TAKS RI indicators, keep the RI calculation the same to take account of the 10 percentage point increase in accountability standards 56

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Component Area Name Other System Components Hurricanes Katrina and Rita 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Component Area Name Other System Components Hurricanes Katrina and Rita 2005 PBMAS N/A 2006 PBMAS Based on the KRI coding from the student assessment answer documents, KRI students will be excluded from PBMAS TAKS performance and participation indicators. 57

2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Use of the Not 2006 PBMAS Preview Program Area Other System Components Component Name Use of the Not Evaluated (NE) performance level 2005 PBMAS 2006 PBMAS Used as one of the PBMAS performance levels The label Not Assigned more accurately captures the result and will be used instead. 58

Interventions Update: General Information • A number of letters of acknowledgement / reports related Interventions Update: General Information • A number of letters of acknowledgement / reports related to on-site validation activities have been disseminated, with more to follow. • TEA reviews of 2005 -2006 submissions are ongoing. • Dissemination of special education correspondence related to 2005 -2006 has begun and will continue during the summer. • 2005 -2006 CTE/CR on-site reviews are in their final phases and should be completed in June. • 2005 -2006 correspondence for program areas other than special education will begin to be disseminated during summer 2006. 59

Interventions Update: General Information (continued) • 2005 -2006 correspondence includes a link to PBM Interventions Update: General Information (continued) • 2005 -2006 correspondence includes a link to PBM & Data Integrity Monitoring System Evaluation 2005 -2006. • Survey is available on the TEA website at: http: //hancock. tea. state. tx. us/tea. pmi. web/survey_log on. aspx. • Functionality very similar to the 2004 -2005 version. • Survey will make available questions on PBM and/or DIM as appropriate to the LEA selected. 60

Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring • Update on TEA Website • Update on RF Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring • Update on TEA Website • Update on RF Tracker • Upcoming Activities and Timelines 61

Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • Update on TEA Website – RF Monitoring Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • Update on TEA Website – RF Monitoring information available at: http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/pmi/rfmon/ – Now includes new section entitled Reference Materials – A number of reference materials have been posted with others to follow – Will include monitoring materials when finalized 62

Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • RF Tracker Update – LEAs continue to Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • RF Tracker Update – LEAs continue to enter data – Deadline for data entry is June 16, 2006 – LEAs continue to request and receive TEASE access to RF Tracker – System has been established to provide ongoing status updates related to regional reporting trends – Updates sent to ESC contact designated at each ESC to receive RF Tracker reporting updates – Submit any additional ESC contact information for RF Tracker reporting to [email protected] state. tx. us – Reminder: LEAs can contact ESCs with requests for financial assistance related to RF Tracker data entry 63

Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • Upcoming Activities and Timelines – By June Other Oversight Activities: RF Monitoring (continued) • Upcoming Activities and Timelines – By June 30, 2006, internal TEA staff training related to RF monitoring – By August 31, 2006, ESCs and LEAs to be educated concerning RF monitoring • Discussion: Additional Strategies for RF Monitoring Training and Education 64

PBMI TETN Dates (Thursdays 9 a. m. to 12: 00 p. m. ) Upcoming PBMI TETN Dates (Thursdays 9 a. m. to 12: 00 p. m. ) Upcoming 2006 Dates June 29 August 3 September 7 October 5 November 2 December 7 65

Texas English Language Learner Initiatives And Training 66 Texas English Language Learner Initiatives And Training 66

Mathematics English Language Learner (MELL) Initiative Texas State University System (TSUS)/TEA partnership The MELL Mathematics English Language Learner (MELL) Initiative Texas State University System (TSUS)/TEA partnership The MELL project is focused on creating practical instructional tools for K-12 educators teaching mathematics to English Language Learning (ELL) students. 67

MELL Initiative • Effective Mathematics Instructional tools • Professional development • Classroom-based research • MELL Initiative • Effective Mathematics Instructional tools • Professional development • Classroom-based research • Best practices in university-based teacher training programs • Guidance for policymakers Additional information regarding MELL at: www. tsusmell. org 68

Texas Mathematics Diagnostic System • Online math tool in English and • Spanish targeting Texas Mathematics Diagnostic System • Online math tool in English and • Spanish targeting students in grades 3 -8 • Grades 9 -12 will be added in 2006 • Aligned with TAKS/TEKS • Over 3, 000 test items www. accesstmds. com/tmds 69

2005 TEA Summer Trainer of Trainers (TOT) for educators serving ELLs: All ESCs can 2005 TEA Summer Trainer of Trainers (TOT) for educators serving ELLs: All ESCs can provide training now: • Bilingual Elementary Science (1 -5) • Dual Language Program Implementation 70

2006 TEA Summer Trainer of Trainers (TOT) for educators serving ELLs: • • • 2006 TEA Summer Trainer of Trainers (TOT) for educators serving ELLs: • • • TOT on LEER MAS II and trainings on the ELP aligned charts will be available during the summer and fall of this year (2006) LEER MAS II Spanish Reading Academies 2 nd-6 th grade Training of Trainers Sept. 6 -8, 2006 Houston Hobby Airport Hilton Sept. 26 -28, 2006 Edinburg Region One ESC This training of trainers is sponsored by Region One ESC-Tesoro Initiative and the Texas Education Agency Funded by a LEP SSI Cycle 3 Grant • Ask your ESC to provide you this training 71

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Revisions • English as a second language (ESL) Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Revisions • English as a second language (ESL) TEKS review is being done simultaneously with Spanish and English Language Arts TEKS in 2006 72

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Revisions • (3) English language learners (ELLs) in Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Revisions • (3) English language learners (ELLs) in fourth grade may be at different stages of language acquisition. The following general proficiency levels are not grade specific: beginning, intermediate, advanced, and advanced high. ELLs may exhibit different proficiency levels within the four language domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. For example, an ELL may exhibit oral proficiency in English at the advanced level and reading and writing proficiency at the intermediate level. The proficiency levels within the language domains are affected by opportunities in and outside of school. 73

Instructional Materials • Proclamation 2004 is moving forward and the 6 th grade Spanish Instructional Materials • Proclamation 2004 is moving forward and the 6 th grade Spanish Math was presented to the publishers on October 21, 2005. • New Spanish 6 th grade TEKS are included. http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/textbooks/proclamations/pr oc 2004/proc 2004. pdf • Proclamation 2005 includes K 5 th grade Spanish Math it includes the new TEKS you may access it at: http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/textbooks/proclamations/pr oc 2005/proc 2005. pdf 74

Social Studies and Science / ELP Chart Trainings were be conducted during May 2006 Social Studies and Science / ELP Chart Trainings were be conducted during May 2006 These charts are currently available on the bilingual website under Documents. These are aligned with the English Proficiency Standards. Please provide training to all your teachers so that content area instruction is provided through ESL and the Spanish speaking parents of ELL’s are informed of their children’s content education standards. Please ask you ESCs to provide you with that training. 75

Math /ELP Charts These charts will are being created this year and will available Math /ELP Charts These charts will are being created this year and will available on the bilingual website under Documents. These are aligned with the English Proficiency Standards. These are for all teachers of English Language Learners so that Math instruction is provided through ESL and the Spanish speaking parents of ELL’s are informed of their children’s content education standards. 76

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) On the fourth-grade mathematics test, Texas tied with National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) On the fourth-grade mathematics test, Texas tied with two other states for fourth place nationally with 87% scoring at or above the Basic performance level (i. e. , Basic, Proficient, or Advanced) Grade 4 Mathematics % At or Above Basic Massachusetts 91% New Hampshire North Dakota 89% Kansas Minnesota 88% Texas Wyoming Vermont 87% 77

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) When comparing Texas students to students across the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) When comparing Texas students to students across the nation, our white, African-American, Hispanic, and Asian-American student groups each performed significantly better than the national average. Grade 4 Mathematics At or Above Basic At or Above Proficient Nation Texas White 89 96 47 60 African-American 60 75 13 18 Hispanic 67 82 19 28 Asian-American 89 96 54 72 78

Dallas ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians 2002 -2005 that started as LEP 79 Dallas ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians 2002 -2005 that started as LEP 79

Houston ISD 2001 -2005 Valedictorians that started as LEP Students 80 Houston ISD 2001 -2005 Valedictorians that started as LEP Students 80

Austin ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians Spring 2002 -2005 that started as LEP Students 81 Austin ISD Valedictorians and Salutatorians Spring 2002 -2005 that started as LEP Students 81

Texas Education Agency Bilingual/ESL Education Website Additional information on Bilingual/ESL education, can be accessed Texas Education Agency Bilingual/ESL Education Website Additional information on Bilingual/ESL education, can be accessed by visiting the Bilingual/ESL Unit website at: http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/ 82

Additional Websites http: //www. sbec. state. tx. us/SBECOnline/ http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/pbm/ Additional Websites http: //www. sbec. state. tx. us/SBECOnline/ http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/pbm/ http: //www. texes. nesinc. com/ http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/ http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/rules/tac/chapter 089/ch 089 bb. html http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/exceptions. html http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/recruitment 1. ppt 83

TEA-Sponsored Training Modules and Resources available on our website http: //www. tea. state. tx. TEA-Sponsored Training Modules and Resources available on our website http: //www. tea. state. tx. us/curriculum/biling/tearesources. html • Framework for the Language Proficiency Assessment Committee Process Manual • Sheltered Instruction in the Middle School • Effective Writing Training • Building Connections in High School Content Areas Through Sheltered Instruction • LEER MAS • Enhancing Instruction for Second Language Learners 84 • Elementary ESL in the Content Areas

 • • • Go to: www. tea. state. tx. us/list Enter name Enter • • • Go to: www. tea. state. tx. us/list Enter name Enter email address Select “Bilingual/ESL” from drop down Click on “Join a list” button Reply to the email confirmation to complete the listserve process 85

Thank you! ¡Gracias! For technical assistance with bilingual/ESL program questions, please contact the bilingual/ESL Thank you! ¡Gracias! For technical assistance with bilingual/ESL program questions, please contact the bilingual/ESL coordinator at your District or Regional Service Center 86