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January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Project: IEEE P 802. January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Project: IEEE P 802. 15 Working Group for Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPANs) Submission Title: [216 – 222 MHz Spectrum Considerations] Date Submitted: [16 January, 2012] Source: [Jon Adams] Company [Lilee Systems, Ltd. ] Address [2905 Stender Way, Suite 78, Santa Clara, CA 95054, USA] Voice: [+1 480. 628. 6686], FAX: [Add FAX number], E-Mail: [[email protected] org] Re: [If this is a proposed revision, cite the original document. ] [If this is a response to a Call for Contributions, cite the name and date of the Call for Contributions to which this document responds, as well as the relevant item number in the Call for Contributions. ] [Note: Contributions that are not responsive to this section of the template, and contributions which do not address the topic under which they are submitted, may be refused or consigned to the “General Contributions” area. ] Abstract: [Review of US 216 to 222 MHz radio spectrum, licensing rules, usages] Purpose: [For the PTC Study Group to use as an informative information as it moves forward. ] Notice: This document has been prepared to assist the IEEE P 802. 15. It is offered as a basis for discussion and is not binding on the contributing individual(s) or organization(s). The material in this document is subject to change in form and content after further study. The contributor(s) reserve(s) the right to add, amend or withdraw material contained herein. Release: The contributor acknowledges and accepts that this contribution becomes the property of IEEE and may be made publicly available by P 802. 15. Submission Slide 1 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 216 – 222 MHz January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 216 – 222 MHz Spectrum Considerations Jon Adams Lilee Systems Submission Slide 2 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Uncertainties and Need for January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Uncertainties and Need for Standards • Mandated deadline for rollout of PTC systems is the end of 2015, less than 48 months away • No radio frequency band mandated for PTC wireless communications • No extensive deployments of PTC in real-world environments • The spectrum that has been acquired to date by the class one railroads and others for the stated purposes of PTC is in bits and pieces • Uncertain the frequency selection and the available spectrum will be sufficient to provide the necessary functionality that PTC may ultimately require Submission Slide 3 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc New Applications Breed Uncertainty January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc New Applications Breed Uncertainty • Don’t know what we don’t know – 3 GPP (worldwide cellular standard) • Established its first 3 G specification, Release-99, in the year 2000 • 7 full specification releases since then • Challenging to predict future use based on current expectation • Far more spectrum usage than was originally considered • Average service life of radio equipment in rail and transit applications is in excess of 10 -15 years • System design may remain in place for 20 -25 years • Over-the-air protocol and spectrum usage standardization critical Submission Slide 4 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc From US DOC NTIA January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc From US DOC NTIA Spectrum Chart, 2003 Submission Slide 5 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 2 W 6 MHz 20 W 25 k. Hz 250 W open January 2012 2 W 6 MHz 20 W 25 k. Hz 250 W open 6 MHz 500 W open TV Ch 13 Part 95. 629 LPRS Part 95 Subpart F Part 97 Ham Radio 222 221 220 219 218 217 216 SPASUR* 216. 880 Channel Spacing Channel Bandwidth 100 k. W? 217. 080 ERP NTE IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Part 97 Ham Radio AMTS Part 80 Subpart H Part 90 subpart K (legacy) Part 90 Subpart K Part 90 Subpart T * SPASUR: USAF Space Fence. 80. 385 (2) AMTS operations must not cause harmful interference to the U. S. Navy (now Air Force – ed. ) SPASUR system which operates in the band 216. 880– 217. 080 MHz. May have impact on AMTS operations in Southern California, central Arizona, southern New Mexico, along the Oklahoma/Texas border, central Alabama and Georgia. Submission Slide 6 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 802. 15. 4 PTC January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 802. 15. 4 PTC Amendment • PHY-centric – Absolutely must adapt to new frequency bands, modulation modes, channel models, robustness and reliability issues • MAC changes – Mostly to support PHY needs – May want to visit time slotting features to ensure utility – Reliability and Robustness Submission Slide 7 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Current Spectrum Usage by January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Current Spectrum Usage by RR/Transits • No mandated spectrum for rail or PTC • Bands currently used by RR/Transit include – Licensed (all Part 90) • • • 44. 56 -44. 60 MHz 160. 0 -161. 565 MHz 452/457 MHz paired 700 and 800 MHz trunked 896 -987 / 935 -936 MHz paired 928 -952 MHz narrow band – License-free (all Part 15) • 902 -928 MHz spread-spectrum, frequency hopping • 2400 -2483. 5 MHz spread spectrum Submission Slide 8 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 216 – 222 MHz January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc 216 – 222 MHz • A large amount of contiguous spectrum that may be underutilized (depending on your “ox”) • Operates under Part 80, 95, and 97 rules • Constraints on use due to extant licensees and intended uses Submission Slide 9 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Wireless Spectrum Review • January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Wireless Spectrum Review • • • Wireless spectrum in the US is a precious commodity 216 – 222 MHz band, which is being targeted by the Class One railroads (BNSF, UP, CXS, NS) as home for PTC Concern has already been raised that there’s not enough spectrum there to support all the users that may need PTC 220 – 222 MHz band is a general land-mobile service band that was established in the late 1980 s for “super-narrow” band voice and data services. As such, the channelization for the band was set at 5 k. Hz, which at the time was extremely challenging from an implementation point of view. The freight and passenger rail entities, and municipal/regional rail transit authorities, also use existing, licensed frequencies in the 160, 450, 800 and 900 MHz spectrum regions. There is the adjacent 216 - 217 MHz, paired 217 – 218 and 219 – 220 MHz spectrum, under FCC part 80, allocated around 15 years ago for the Automated Maritime Telecommunications System (AMTS). The idea behind AMTS was to enable communications service providers to supply both voice- and data-communications to maritime users on all inland waterways, and those along the US coast inside the 12 -mile limit. The rules were written such that the spectrum could be used in Part 90 Land Mobile Radio (LMR) Service systems so long as the LMR systems avoid interference to AMTS stations. As a result, this spectrum may be useful for freight, passenger or transit rail entities that are away from inland waterways or coastal regions. The 25 k. Hz channelization is different from that of the 220 – 222 MHz band, and as such is subject to the FCC ’s Narrowbanding mandate, due to go into effect in 2013. Submission Slide 10 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Part 95 Uses (“ January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Part 95 Uses (“ 10 -4 Gud Buddy”) • Part 95 Personal Radio Service (home of Citizen’s Band Radio Service) specifies the use of two different segments in the spectrum adjacent to the 220 MHz band • Low Power Radio Service (Part 95 subpart G) at 216 – 217 MHz – – 260 channels spaced at 5 k. Hz intervals Transmitters may operate at ERPs as high as 500 m. W Does not require licensing by location Possibility of itinerant users in proximity to transit or rail facilities must be considered • (Part 95, subpart F) 218 – 219 MHz – Allows for fixed and mobile stations. – Base stations, called Cell Transmitter Stations (CTS), have power outputs up to 20 W ERP – Licensing by Economic Area region Submission Slide 11 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Don’t Forget about KCOP January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Don’t Forget about KCOP (Ch 13) • 216 - 222 MHz is adjacent to broadcasting TV channel 13 (210 – 216 MHz) • Existing channel 13 broadcaster has an antenna at significant height above average terrain, transmitting with an equivalent radiated power (ERP) of 50 kilowatts or more • Since railroad right of way and TV broadcasting tower are generally both legacy installations, the new PTC installation will have little chance to cause either operator to relocate • Special caution required to prevent nearby powerful TV transmitter from blocking PTC receiver Submission Slide 12 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems

January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Oh, and Did I January 2012 IEEE 802. 15 -12 -0029 -00 -0 ptc Oh, and Did I mention TV White Spaces? • US FCC TV White Space Ruling • In place as of Jan 2011 • Allows license-free transmitters to use with limited coordination any TV channel not occupied by an existing broadcaster or other protected use Submission Slide 13 Jon Adams, Lilee Systems