Скачать презентацию Into the Promised Land Apostasy Joshua — Judges Скачать презентацию Into the Promised Land Apostasy Joshua — Judges

37c40995523478467932fabe32a31a06.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 65

Into the Promised Land Apostasy Joshua - Judges 1 Into the Promised Land Apostasy Joshua - Judges 1

Into the Promised Land Recap - Covenant has just been renewed and laws have Into the Promised Land Recap - Covenant has just been renewed and laws have been very clearly spelled out for God’s people in the Torah - Joshua is commissioned in Duet. And Moses only views the promise land from Mount Nebo - Last of grumbling generation pass away - Joshua has been through it all - Slavery Wilderness PL 2

Joshua Overview Joshua - God is Salvation - Themes of heroism, courage, obedience and Joshua Overview Joshua - God is Salvation - Themes of heroism, courage, obedience and leadership - Savior of a nation Messianic Foreshadowing - One of the most flawless protagonists in Bible - Can you think of the flaws of our main characters in past? - Adam, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joshua, Moses - Around 60 by the time he entered the PL - First clear condoning of “Man slaughtering man” - Ends the same way Deut. does: leader challenging people to commit to covenant - Keep an eye out for Moses Parallels** 3

Chapter Breakdown: 1 -12 Occupation of the Land 1: Yahweh’s sermon to Joshua and Chapter Breakdown: 1 -12 Occupation of the Land 1: Yahweh’s sermon to Joshua and Joshua’s challenge to the eastern clans Be brave and courageous 2 different times (v. 6, 9). Why is this repeated? You is plural in v. 3 -4 but singular in v. 5 -9 2: Joshua’s surprising stratagem to prepare for entering the land Why were spies even necessary? Clear that the stories of God’s people have been spread quick (v. 8 -13 Rehab) 3— 4: Joshua’s surprising way of entering the land: immigration as a religious procession Ark of covenant was carried first, 2, 000 cubits in front of all people. Water parts** but not necessary during this location and season. Why? Who’s watching? 12 stones as commemoration 5: Joshua’s religious acts on entering the land: circumcision, Passover**, submission Theophany (leader of Yawaeh’s army)…Holy Ground Deliverance of God’s people** 6: Joshua’s surprising way of taking the first town: conquest as a religious 4 procession 7 days, 7 priests, 7 horns and the arc of the covenant (7 times around on the last day)

Chapter Breakdown: 1 -12 Occupation of the Land 7: Joshua’s first failure and how Chapter Breakdown: 1 -12 Occupation of the Land 7: Joshua’s first failure and how he handles it: defeat as God’s punishment Juxtaposition of Rahab (Canaanite) and Achan (Isrealite)…Purpose? 8: Joshua’s new experience of Yahweh’s guidance Annihilated Ai taking only cattle and livestock and executed the king. How? “New start after failing” motif begins “Ai” = ruin…perhaps it was a lot easier and stories just originated 8: 30 -35: Joshua’s celebration and act of dedication 9: Joshua’s second failure and how he handles it Tricked by Hivites to make a treaty. How? Was Joshua really at fault? Why? 10: Joshua’s victories over people who attack Israel’s ally Similar to Abraham's journey and actions Confused and hailstones; sun/moon stood still and 5 impalements 10: 40 -43: Summary of Joshua’s victory over the whole land 5 Whole south is conquered…or is it? Why are these cities conquered again later on?

Conquest of Canaan 6 Conquest of Canaan 6

Chapter Breakdown: 13 -24 Allocation of the Land 11: 1 -15: Joshua’s victory when Chapter Breakdown: 13 -24 Allocation of the Land 11: 1 -15: Joshua’s victory when attacked by Hazor and its allies 11: 16— 12: 24: Summary of Joshua’s victory over the whole land 13: 1 -7: Introduction to the allocation of the land, and the land that remains to be conquered 13: 8 -33: Reuben, Gad, half Manasseh (east of the Jordan), Levi 14: 1 -5: Introduction to the allocation of the land 14: 6 -15: Caleb, and the people that remain to be conquered 15: Judah, and the people that remain to be conquered 16— 17: Ephraim and the other half of Manasseh, and the people that remain to be conquered 7

Chapter Breakdown: 13 -24 Allocation of the Land 18: 1 -10: Setting up the Chapter Breakdown: 13 -24 Allocation of the Land 18: 1 -10: Setting up the tent of meeting at Shiloh; preparation for allocation of the rest of the land 18: 11— 19: 51: Benjamin, Simeon, Zebulun, Issachar, Asher, Naphtali, Dan 20: Cities of refuge 21: 1 -42 Cities for Levi 21: 43 -45: Summary of Yahweh’s gift of the whole land 22: Relationships between the western and eastern clans 23: 1— 24: 28 Joshua’s final challenge to the people and their response: another serious sermon 24: 29 -33 Joshua’s death 8

Sir Gawain in the Green Knight Sir Gawain in the Green Knight

Author Unknown 14 th century (contemporary of Chaucer) Northwestern part of England Pearl, Purity, Author Unknown 14 th century (contemporary of Chaucer) Northwestern part of England Pearl, Purity, Patience poems that were similar Knowledge of law and theology Mix of Christian / Military (Chilvary)/Paganism Trawthe – truth, devotion, fidelity

Medieval Romance Idealized and larger than life characters A hero motivated by love, faith, Medieval Romance Idealized and larger than life characters A hero motivated by love, faith, honor and adventure Exotic setting, supernatural or magical elements Hidden or mistaken identity

Old Testament Breakdown Law (5) History (12) Wisdom (5) Prophecy (17) Genesis Exodus Leviticus Old Testament Breakdown Law (5) History (12) Wisdom (5) Prophecy (17) Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy Joshua Judges Ruth 1&2 Samuel 1&2 Kings 1&2 Chronicles Ezra Nehemiah Esther Job Psalms Proverbs Ecclesiastes Song of Solomon Major Prophets Isaiah Jeremiah Lamentations Ezekiel Daniel Minor Prophets Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, 12 Malachi

Judges Among the Twelve Joshua = the possession of a nation Judges and Ruth Judges Among the Twelve Joshua = the possession of a nation Judges and Ruth = the oppression of a nation 1 and 2 Samuel = the stabilization and expansion of a nation 1 and 2 Kings = the glorification and deterioration of a nation 13

Judges Among the Twelve 1 and 2 Chronicles = the preparation and destruction of Judges Among the Twelve 1 and 2 Chronicles = the preparation and destruction of the temple Ezra = the reconstruction of the temple Nehemiah = the reconstruction of the city Esther = the protection of the people 14

15 15

16 16

Book Background Title: “Judges” (Heb. shophetim) means a ruler who is a “deliverer” or Book Background Title: “Judges” (Heb. shophetim) means a ruler who is a “deliverer” or “savior” (2: 16) Authorship: Anonymous. Jewish tradition assigns the book to Samuel or one of his prophetic students (1 Sam. 10: 5) Audience: Israel in the land of Canaan under a united monarchy is reminded of their immediate past idolatry and forsaking of the Lord. Time: About 300 years (1390 – 1090 B. C. ) Location: Israel in the land of Canaan for approximately 300 years (11: 26) 17

Main Theme…Apostasy: It’s a vicious cycle Abandonment of one’s religion or creeds The formula: Main Theme…Apostasy: It’s a vicious cycle Abandonment of one’s religion or creeds The formula: 1. The Israelites do something offensive in the eyes of God 2. God allows a foreign people to defeat and subjugate the Israelites 3. Some time elapses and the Israelites cry out to God for help 4. God then hears their cries and raises up a judge to deliver the people from the foreign oppressors. 5. Finally, the Judge dies and the Israelites again commit apostasy, restarting the process. 18

Outline of the Book The Deterioration of Israel (Judges 1 -2) Failure to Complete Outline of the Book The Deterioration of Israel (Judges 1 -2) Failure to Complete the Conquest (Judges 1) Judgment for Failure to Complete the Conquest (Judges 2) The repeated information can be Joshua’s writer writing with prediction of what was most likely to come before it actually happened and the writer of Judges actually capturing the true events. 19

Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar (Judges 3) Eldest-ism, ableism, ethnocentrism Deborah (Judges 4 -5) Bee Barak (Lighting) wife of fiery torches (Lappidoth) Jael and Sisera Gideon (Judges 6 -8) Master Contends Doubts God and asks for signs Receives strange instructions to dwindle army to 300. Why? Hunts down and captures Midianite kings Pays back inhospitable Succoth and Penuel with thorns and briars Asks son, Jether, to kill captive kings but he refuses Refuses to be king but still acts like one

Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Abimelech Son (Judges Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Abimelech Son (Judges 9) of secondary wife…reason to prove himself perhaps? Convinces Jotham God Shechem he should be king and slaughters 69 bros gets away and tries to persuade the city otherwise. answers and causes dissension Shechem team up with Gaal to overthrow Abimelech About find ally with Zebul and responds to burn down building with people until…stoned!!! Asks armor bearer to kill him to avoid reputation of being killed by woman. 21

Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Tola-23 years Jair-22 Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Tola-23 years Jair-22 years (Judges 10) Jephthah Kicked Asked (Judges 11) out since he was Gilead’s from son of harlot back to lead against Ammonites “smote them with a very great slaughter…” Makes a strange vow before battle and follows through with it unfortunately New tradition for women each year began to commemorate his daughter. Defeats Ephraimites after voicing dislike for not including them in battle with Ammonites Ephraimites that flee across river are given 22 speech test if a they want to cross “shibboleth” = stream

Outline of the Book Questions about Jephthah’s daughter Was J’s promise a result of Outline of the Book Questions about Jephthah’s daughter Was J’s promise a result of God’s spirit coming on him? Who or what did he think would come out of the house to greet him? Did the promise work, causing God to give him victory? Why aren’t we told the daughter’s name? Is it monstrous that he blames her for what happens and sees her as bringing calamity on him? Why didn’t she resist the implementation of her father’s promise? What is she weeping for when she is weeping for her virginity? Why didn’t God intervene like with Abraham and Isaac? 23

Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Ibzan- 7 years Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Ibzan- 7 years Matchmaker and expands clan Elon- 10 years Abdon 8 years (Judges 12) Samson (Judges 13 -16) 40 years of philistine captivity and then superman is born! Mother is barren and visited by an angel…sound familiar Father visits with angel and offers sacrifice Samson is born and the Lord blesses him and begins moving Desires to marry a Philistine women but told not to Kills a lion with the “spirit of the lord” = hulks rage 24

Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Riddle at the Outline of the Book The Deliverance of Israel (Judges 3 -16) Riddle at the wedding was a let down so…“Samson Smash” again Wife is given to someone else making resulting in…foxes and fields burning Judaites turn him over and the donkey jaw bone comes out! (1, 000) All this killing has made him thirsty Rules and takes Delilah but is tricked…he wasn’t the sharpest tool in the shed With head shaved and no eyes he is forced to grind grain (womanly) Last hurrah!!! 25

Outline of the Book The Depravity of Israel (Judges 17 -21) Idolatry (17 -18) Outline of the Book The Depravity of Israel (Judges 17 -21) Idolatry (17 -18) Immorality Infighting (19) (20 -21) 26

Joshua and Judges A Story in Contrasts Joshua Faithful (24: 16 -28, 31) Victory Joshua and Judges A Story in Contrasts Joshua Faithful (24: 16 -28, 31) Victory (21: 43 -45) Peace (11: 24; 14: 15; 23: 1) Freedom (21: 43 -45) Joy (21: 43 -45) Unity (22: 30 -34) Spirituality (1: 6 -9; 23: 612) Honor (6: 27) Judges Faithless (2: 10 -15) Defeat (3 -16) War (20 -21) Bondage (2: 18) Sorrow (2: 4) Division (20 -21) Immorality (17 -19) 27 Dishonor (16: 20)

28 28

Into the Promised Land 29 Into the Promised Land 29

The Judges of Israel Hebrews 11: 32 -33 Judge Tribe Character Reference Othniel Judah The Judges of Israel Hebrews 11: 32 -33 Judge Tribe Character Reference Othniel Judah Warrior 3: 9 -10 Ehud Benjamin Cunning 3: 15 -29 Fearless 3: 31 Shamgar --- Deborah Ephraim? Supportive 4: 4 -10 Gideon Manasseh Valiant 6: 11 -18 Abimelech? Manasseh Self-serving 9: 1 -57 Tola Issachar --- 10: 1 -2 Jair Manasseh? --- 10: 3 -5 Jephthah Manasseh Ibzan Judah --- 12: 8 -10 Elon Zebulun --- 12: 11 Abdon Ephraim? --- 12: 13 -15 Samson Dan Vowing 11: 29 -33 Strong / Weak 3 14: 6, 19; 16: 20 0

The Rape of the Lock: Background Alexander Pope: Celebrity of his (Rockstar Poetstar) Neoclacissim: The Rape of the Lock: Background Alexander Pope: Celebrity of his (Rockstar Poetstar) Neoclacissim: the revival of a classical style or treatment in art, literature, architecture, or music. Mock epic: references classical works that use humor/satire in order to make a new point. Often able to form observations about contemporary culture, religion and social issues in a funny, meaningful style. Iambic Pentameter: AABBCC (Regular and structured) Synoposis: Asked to end a feud (Capulet and Montague status) between two families after a rape has separated them years prior Belle Fermor and Lord Petre What’s with the title? FYI: Rape did not mean the same thing in the early 1700’s First written 1712 but eventually ended with 5 Cantos (Parts) Satirical and meant to poke fun at such a trivial problem with use of extreme juxtaposition in order to bring about change. (Heroic Couplets) 31 http: //www. omgten. org/2014/08/24/top-10 -stupid-things-that-started-wars/ https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=a 8 Yg. Ta. My. ZRk

How it should be read? ˘ ˊ |˘ ˊ| ˘ ˊ Say what strange How it should be read? ˘ ˊ |˘ ˊ| ˘ ˊ Say what strange Motive, Goddess! cou'd compel ˘ ˊ|˘ ˊ|˘ˊ|˘ ˊ A well-bred Lord t'assault a gentle Belle? 32

The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 1: We then learn that the dream The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 1: We then learn that the dream has come from the Sylph, Ariel, the airy spirit who watches over her. In the dream, Ariel explains the entire spirit-world of the poem, and introduces the sylphs and gnomes who will play important roles in the action later on. Meet Belinda, who is a rich and beautiful woman who is just waking up from a wonderful dream. Belinda wakes up fully and rings for her maid, who helps her get dressed and put on her makeup for the day. Invisible to the humans, Belinda's army of attendant sylphs help with her face, hair, and outfit. Canto 2: Belinda is in a barge, sailing down the River Thames on her way to a fancy party at Hampton Court, one of the country residences of the royal family. We learn here that her hairstyle features two curling locks that hang down the back of her neck. Ariel the sylph makes a speech to all of the other sylphs, telling them he's had a premonition that something terrible is about to happen, and that they should all be on 33 their guard during the party.

The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 3: The card game itself is described The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 3: The card game itself is described as a metaphorical battle between Belinda and her opponent, the Baron, who unbeknownst to Belinda is also scheming to steal one of her two locks of hair. Belinda at the party with all of her friends, sipping coffee (a novelty refreshment in the early 1700 s, believe it or not) and playing a card game After Belinda wins the game, the Baron borrows a pair of scissors from her frenemy, Clarissa. He sneaks up behind her and, despite all of the efforts of Ariel and the Sylphs, snips off the lock. Canto 4: Belinda is having a complete hysterical fit about theft. Pope gives her rage a supernatural source, telling us that Umbriel, a resentful gnome, goes down to the underworld to pick up a bag full of tears, sobs, and anger, which he then empties over Belinda's head. After this, there's no way that Belinda will laugh off the Baron's prank 34

The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 5: Clarissa (friend) trying to tell her The Rape of the Lock: Overview Canto 5: Clarissa (friend) trying to tell her to be a good sport about it. Belinda ignores this advice, and starts a fight between herself and her friends, and the Baron and his friends. It's more of a battle of insults and mean looks than a physical throwdown, but a ton of social damage gets done all the same. Just when it looks like Belinda's side is winning, we discover that the lock of hair itself has gone missing. 35

Breaking it down: Group Work Get into a group of 2 -3 and receive Breaking it down: Group Work Get into a group of 2 -3 and receive assigned portion. Choose one of the following roles of the group Illustrator (depicting your entire section on the paper provided) Speaker (delivering summary/analysis of portion to class) Paraphraser (reading paraphrased version of section to class) Use the same pronouns used by the author (1 st, 2 nd, 3 rd) Take turns while you read the entire assigned section aloud with as much iambic pentameter as possible. Discuss what you know from your section just from reading of actual text Read through analysis aloud as a group and begin breaking down the poem into a overall picture, summary and modern day paraphrase 36

Book Background Authorship: Anonymous. Jewish tradition assigns the book to Samuel, but the author Book Background Authorship: Anonymous. Jewish tradition assigns the book to Samuel, but the author may have lived after the death of Samuel and during the reign of David (Ruth 4: 17, 22; 1 Sam. 25: 1) Date: The story takes place during the time of the Judges (Ruth 1: 1) Audience: Israel in the land of Canaan under a united monarchy (David) is reminded of how individual faithfulness can exist in the midst of national faithlessness (the time of the Judges). Time: The story of Ruth covers a period of about 11 years (1: 4; 1: 22; 2: 23; 4: 13 -16) Location: The book open with Ruth and Naomi in Moab (Ruth 1). The book closes with Ruth and Boaz in Bethlehem (Ruth 2 -4). 37

The Story of Ruth Bethlehem Naomi returns to Bethlehem in Judah with Ruth (1: The Story of Ruth Bethlehem Naomi returns to Bethlehem in Judah with Ruth (1: 6 -22) Naomi travels with her family to Moab (1: 1 -5). 38

Ruth: A Story of Devoted Love Ruth 4: 15 Referenc Location Role e Ruth Ruth: A Story of Devoted Love Ruth 4: 15 Referenc Location Role e Ruth 1 Moab Daughter Ruth 2 Field of B. Gleaner Ruth 3 Ruth 4 Action Love Deciding Serving Resolve Response Thr. Floor Petitioner Resting City Gate Mother Waiting 39 Request Reward

Outline of the Book: Ruth 1 Famine causes Elimilek to ditch out and perhaps Outline of the Book: Ruth 1 Famine causes Elimilek to ditch out and perhaps even break ties with family Why choose the Moabites? Back to back grieving Begins journey back to home (Bethlehem) because God is moving Famous conversation with her daughter-in-laws appears to happen along the way. . . the Naomi "woe is me" fest begins. Rhetorical argument and Naomi convinces Orpah regretfully but not Naomi. remember the bartering culture? Offering things twice reluctantly nowadays ? – Ruth shuts her up in v. 17 with some weighty words Word gets around of her return Self shaming continues and she changes her own name and proclaims it!!! What are most people's thoughts of Naomi From Naomi (my delight) to Mara (bitterness) Arrived at the beginning of harvest with Ruth’s devotion to care for Naomi 40

Outline of the Book: Ruth 2 Boaz is a close relative (kinsman=redeemer) to Elimilech Outline of the Book: Ruth 2 Boaz is a close relative (kinsman=redeemer) to Elimilech Common for Naomi to reside near her husbands family. What are benefits of this? Ruth goes out to glean and Boaz sees here "Whose young woman is this? " And then offers her protection and food if she stays. Boaz responds protectively and almost romantically. “Can you feel the love in the fields. ” Word had gotten around and many knew about her now. Boaz is doing all this because of her actions to stay with Naomi. After a nice first date and being filled both physically and spiritually she leaves with excess and then offered to glean even more from within the sheaves where she collects an ephah (50 lbs. ) Naomi's reaction in v. 19 must have been rich. Most return from gleaning with 1 lb and sometimes nothing. Naomi reminds her that he is kinsman = redeemer and to continue gleaning with his women to guarantee protection. 41

Outline of the Book: Ruth 3 Naomi sees an opportunity to perhaps save Ruth Outline of the Book: Ruth 3 Naomi sees an opportunity to perhaps save Ruth and gives her some strange advice. Naomi has come a long way and we see a switch flipped her from a selfish loathed to a selfless initiator Very rare for woman to initiate nowadays and even more so back then. This would be quite ridiculous. Most fields were outside the city and therefore during harvest openers stayed over night with their crop to fend of thieves "make yourself known" yada uncover feet = uncover nakedness presenting herself sexually was not an offer for a one night stand but probably a proposal doesn't seem he accepts but knows there is another suitor that could redeem her as well so just lets her stay the night and gives her food in the morning to go home. 42

Outline of the Book: Ruth 4 Boaz decides to seek out and discover this Outline of the Book: Ruth 4 Boaz decides to seek out and discover this guy’s real intentions He is serious…. rolling deep with 10 elders Explains the rules and really wants to know his decision quickly so he can act if necessary I will redeem it!! He said But when Boaz mentions Ruth, he declines. : ( This could endanger my own estate…what might his fear be about taking on Ruth as a wife? The Sandal Deal and joyful pronouncement Next comes love, then comes marriage, then comes an Obed in the baby carriage. Obed Jesse David 43

Romanticism A Movement Across the Arts Romanticism A Movement Across the Arts

Definition v Romanticism refers to a movement in art, literature, and music during the Definition v Romanticism refers to a movement in art, literature, and music during the 19 th century. v Romanticism is characterized by the 5 “I”s v Imagination v Intuition v Idealism v Inspiration v Individuality

Imagination v Imagination was emphasized over “reason. ” v This was a backlash against Imagination v Imagination was emphasized over “reason. ” v This was a backlash against the rationalism characterized by the Neoclassical period or “Age of Reason. ” v Imagination was considered necessary for creating all art. v British writer Samuel Taylor Coleridge called it “intellectual intuition. ”

Intuition v Romantics placed value on “intuition, ” or feeling and instincts, over reason. Intuition v Romantics placed value on “intuition, ” or feeling and instincts, over reason. v Emotions were important in Romantic art. v British Romantic William Wordsworth described poetry as “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings. ”

Idealism v Idealism is the concept that we can make the world a better Idealism v Idealism is the concept that we can make the world a better place. v Idealism refers to any theory that emphasizes the spirit, the mind, or language over matter – thought has a crucial role in making the world the way it is. v Immanuel Kant, a German philosopher, held that the mind forces the world we perceive to take the shape of space-and-time.

Inspiration v The Romantic artist, musician, or writer, is an “inspired creator” rather than Inspiration v The Romantic artist, musician, or writer, is an “inspired creator” rather than a “technical master. ” v What this means is “going with the moment” or being spontaneous, rather than “getting it precise. ”

v Individuality Romantics celebrated the individual. v During this time period, Women’s Rights and v Individuality Romantics celebrated the individual. v During this time period, Women’s Rights and Abolitionism were taking root as major movements. v Walt Whitman, a later Romantic writer, would write a poem entitled “Song of Myself”: it begins, “I celebrate myself…”

Origins v Romanticism began to take root as a movement following the French Revolution. Origins v Romanticism began to take root as a movement following the French Revolution. v The publication of Lyrical Ballads by William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1792 is considered the beginning of literary Romanticism.

The Arts v Romanticism was a movement across all the arts: visual art, music, The Arts v Romanticism was a movement across all the arts: visual art, music, and literature. v All of the arts embraced themes prevalent in the Middle Ages: chivalry, courtly love. Literature and art from this time depicted these themes. Music (ballets and operas) illustrated these themes. v Shakespeare came back into vogue.

Visual Arts: Examples Romantic Art Neoclassical Art Visual Arts: Examples Romantic Art Neoclassical Art

John Keats Father died in riding accident and mother died from tuberculosis Engaged to John Keats Father died in riding accident and mother died from tuberculosis Engaged to Fanny Brawne but never married due to poor health and poverty Died at 25 after long fight against tuberculosis and therefore wrote of death often in last days

Backstory to Poem Every good British Poet knew his Ovid (Roman) just like every Backstory to Poem Every good British Poet knew his Ovid (Roman) just like every good rock n’ roll artist knows his Beatles. The story of Tereus, Philomela and Pronce Rape, cuts out tongue, weave the truth, sick idea, attempted murder, Greek Gods step in. Irony behind Philimela’s new state Nightingale Desire to flee pressures of the world much like Philomela did Written in 1819 while visiting a friend and having breakfast under a tree Song of bird is affecting him like a drug as he drifts off from reality Nature is Keat’s drug, no need to real drugs Setting is deep in the heart of the forest and at night 55

Ode to a Nightingale My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, Ode to a Nightingale My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains One minute past, and Lethe-wards had sunk: 'Tis not through envy of thy happy lot, But being too happy in thine happiness, — That thou, light-winged Dryad of the trees In some melodious plot Of beechen green, and shadows numberless, Singest of summer in full-throated ease.

Ode to a Nightingale O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Cool'd Ode to a Nightingale O, for a draught of vintage! that hath been Cool'd a long age in the deep-delved earth, Tasting of Flora and the country green, Dance, and Provençal song, and sunburnt mirth! O for a beaker full of the warm South, Full of the true, the blushful Hippocrene, With beaded bubbles winking at the brim, And purple-stained mouth; That I might drink, and leave the world unseen, And with thee fade away into the forest dim:

Ode to a Nightingale Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget What thou among Ode to a Nightingale Fade far away, dissolve, and quite forget What thou among the leaves hast never known, The weariness, the fever, and the fret Here, where men sit and hear each other groan; Where palsy shakes a few, sad, last gray hairs, Where youth grows pale, and spectre-thin, and dies; Where but to think is to be full of sorrow And leaden-eyed despairs, Where Beauty cannot keep her lustrous eyes, Or new Love pine at them beyond to-morrow.

Ode to a Nightingale Away! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted Ode to a Nightingale Away! away! for I will fly to thee, Not charioted by Bacchus and his pards, But on the viewless wings of Poesy, Though the dull brain perplexes and retards: Already with thee! tender is the night, And haply the Queen-Moon is on her throne, Cluster'd around by all her starry Fays; But here there is no light, Save what from heaven is with the breezes blown Through verdurous glooms and winding mossy ways.

Ode to a Nightingale I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Nor Ode to a Nightingale I cannot see what flowers are at my feet, Nor what soft incense hangs upon the boughs, But, in embalmed darkness, guess each sweet Wherewith the seasonable month endows The grass, the thicket, and the fruit-tree wild; White hawthorn, and the pastoral eglantine; Fast fading violets cover'd up in leaves; And mid-May's eldest child, The coming musk-rose, full of dewy wine, The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves. .

Ode to a Nightingale Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have Ode to a Nightingale Darkling I listen; and, for many a time I have been half in love with easeful Death, Call'd him soft names in many a mused rhyme, To take into the air my quiet breath; Now more than ever seems it rich to die, To cease upon the midnight with no pain, While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad In such an ecstasy! Still wouldst thou sing, and I have ears in vain— To thy high requiem become a sod. .

Ode to a Nightingale Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry Ode to a Nightingale Thou wast not born for death, immortal Bird! No hungry generations tread thee down; The voice I hear this passing night was heard In ancient days by emperor and clown: Perhaps the self-same song that found a path Through the sad heart of Ruth, when, sick for home, She stood in tears amid the alien corn; The same that oft-times hath Charm'd magic casements, opening on the foam Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn.

Ode to a Nightingale Forlorn! the very word is like a bell To toll Ode to a Nightingale Forlorn! the very word is like a bell To toll me back from thee to my sole self! Adieu! the fancy cannot cheat so well As she is fam'd to do, deceiving elf. Adieu! adieu! thy plaintive anthem fades Past the near meadows, over the still stream, Up the hill-side; and now 'tis buried deep In the next valley-glades: Was it a vision, or a waking dream? Fled is that music: —Do I wake or sleep?

Ode to a Nightingale Speaker envies the happiness and longevity of a nightingale The Ode to a Nightingale Speaker envies the happiness and longevity of a nightingale The speaker is excited to pass into next life but is unsure if it is even real. http: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=Hr AGCJJk. Nb. E

Write an Ode: Something in Nature 1. Choose something in nature to write an Write an Ode: Something in Nature 1. Choose something in nature to write an "Ode" much like the Romantics 2. Write 1 Stanza of 12 lines using ABAB , AABB rhyming 3. Include metaphor, simile, onomontepea and personification. Daylight dawns and begins to say hello As a baby opens his eyes and greets the day The burning star becomes a friend and foe It is fire on my skin and my thoughts do not delay