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Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes Ronald J. Zimmer CAE CABA President & Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes Ronald J. Zimmer CAE CABA President & CEO Continental Automated Buildings Association http: //www. CABA. org Linked. In Profile

About CABA Continental Automated Buildings Association Ø International not-for-profit industry association Ø Dedicated to About CABA Continental Automated Buildings Association Ø International not-for-profit industry association Ø Dedicated to the advancement of intelligent home and intelligent building technologies Ø Membership driven Ø Provides members with networking and market research opportunities Ø Celebrating 25 th anniversary in 2013 Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

CABA Connected Home Council Continental Automated Buildings Association Ø Established in 2004 Ø Initiates CABA Connected Home Council Continental Automated Buildings Association Ø Established in 2004 Ø Initiates and reviews projects that relate to connected home and multiple dwelling unit technologies and applications. Ø Examines industry opportunities that can accelerate the adoption of new technologies, consumer electronics and broadband services within the burgeoning connected home market. Ø Oversees “connected home” research activities Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

CABA Research Program The CABA Research Program offers a range of opt-in technical and CABA Research Program The CABA Research Program offers a range of opt-in technical and advisory research services designed to provide industry stakeholders with collaborative market research and R&D opportunities. Benefits Ø Reduced cost of research by working with other industry leaders in a collaborative research environment. Ø Tailored to member research project development needs and requirements. Ø Completely formatted research reports that are actionable business tools. Ø Reduced workload for participating companies. Ø Collaborative setting without antitrust issues. Ø Organizations direct research objectives. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes Continental Automated Buildings Association CABA and the Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes Continental Automated Buildings Association CABA and the following CABA members funded this project: Emerald Sponsors Diamond Sponsors Prepared by:

Connected Home Overview Defining a Connected Home: Frost & Sullivan’s interactions with the connected Connected Home Overview Defining a Connected Home: Frost & Sullivan’s interactions with the connected home industry, and building upon previous projects undertaken by CABA in the connected home area, the following definition was adopted to define a ‘connected home’: “A residential dwelling unit that uses both technology and process to create a plug-and-play environment that is safe, responsive, adaptive and comfortable for its occupants”. Key characteristics observed by this research: • Transition from ‘digital’ to connected • Interconnected and intercommunicate • Adaptive to a homeowner’s needs and comforts • Wide variations in “connectedness” depending upon sophistication of the ‘connected network’ • • Built ad-hoc by techsavvy consumers Limited or no unifying/connecting presence • • • Evolved into ‘Connected Home Platform’ Customer premise equipment used by service provider to deliver services and applications Controlled by consumers and/or service provider Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Connected Home Segments The connected home, and its interconnection with the smart grid, is Connected Home Segments The connected home, and its interconnection with the smart grid, is being conceived as the convergence of four key segments/layers of the industry: • • Energy resources Physical infrastructure components Data communication Automation and integration interface Telecommunication Services Energy Sources Conventional / Renewable/ Distributed Utility (LAN, WAN, FAN) Smart Meter Communication/ Other Gateway Home Control Systems, Security, Entertainment Home Area Network Energy Management, Monitoring, Others Information Technology Applications and Services Source: Frost & Sullivan Analysis. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Connected Home – Participant Characteristics Participant Key Characteristics Issues to be Addressed Tech-savvy but Connected Home – Participant Characteristics Participant Key Characteristics Issues to be Addressed Tech-savvy but slow to accept new technology Confused by multiple technologies/solutions Privacy concerns regarding data sharing with external parties Can influence technology adoption Enjoy consumer mindshare and trust to a certain extent Products still highly customized and needs professional installations Align technology with actual market needs Actively collaborate on an open-source basis with adjunct industry partners Standardize technology solutions Telcos and Service Providers Established presence with consumers Wide coverage; ubiquitous access Growing participation with standards bodies Technology innovation ahead of actual market adoption needs Achieving better alignment of technology Delivering scalable solutions and interfaces that could work harmoniously Initiatives to move from static to dynamic framework Challenged with embracing culture changes Financial constraints in implementing changes Technology adoption and diversification Collaborative role in policy implementation Dynamic partnerships with technology vendors Consumers Home Products and Technology Suppliers Utilities Simplicity of systems and options Reliability of communication networks Data and personal security vulnerabilities Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Connected Home – Presently Active Areas Home Controls/ Monitoring Energy Management/ Smart Grid Media, Connected Home – Presently Active Areas Home Controls/ Monitoring Energy Management/ Smart Grid Media, Telecom, Managed Services • Providing automation and control of specific home equipment such as HVAC, lighting, security, energy management • Dominated by home automation and controls companies such as ADT, Crestron, AMX, Control 4, Schneider Electric, GE, Honeywell • Estimated market size in North America is $2. 5 Billion I 2012 • Combination of energy management and home control services that allows proactive energy use suggestions, integration with smart meters, driven by utilities or consumer • Key players include Utilities in North America, Smart meter providers such as GE, Itron, etc and associated service providers such as Energent, Energate, etc. • Estimated market size in North America is $ 9. 6 billion in 2012 • Providing communication, multimedia and entertainment services to the consumer, with an increasing range of home management services • Key players include Comcast, Bell, AT&T, Verizon, etc • Subscriber base for broadband alone in Q 3 2011 is estimated at approx. 92. 6 million in North America ($12. 1 billion in revenue) Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Utilities’ Current Decision Making Process – Issues and Changes Required The market is dictated Utilities’ Current Decision Making Process – Issues and Changes Required The market is dictated by a lengthy decision-making process. The following illustrates the typical approval process for investor owned utilities (IOU) IOU Procurement Process 1. Planning Process: Utilities must begin the planning and approval process for new resources years in advance. 2. Financing Arrangements Financing arrangements occur in advance of actual construction. 3. Filing with Public Utility Commission Utilities must file construction plans with the respective PUC for approval. 4. PUC Conduct Public Hearings 5. PUC Approval 6. Request for Proposal Vendor selection occurs by means of a request for proposal (RFP). It takes between six and nine months to create an RFP. 7. Interview and Screening Process It takes 3 months to initiate an RFP and to receive information back. It can take an additional 9 months to close. 8. Supplier Selection The entire RFP process can take between 12 and 16 months. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Utility Initiatives • Full deployment of AMI Long term Medium term Short-term Implementing programs Utility Initiatives • Full deployment of AMI Long term Medium term Short-term Implementing programs to monitor electrcity usage online and transitioning customers to TOU rates. Full deployment of AMI systems will aid the development and availability of micro grid to support growing electricity usage. Using meter data for other then just billing purpose. Gaps Strategies are being deployed to use meter data for voltage conservation strategies and outage management by converging AMI with distribution automation systems. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 systems in order to integrate TOU rates with current and future smart home appliances • Open platforms for meter technology to enable wide adoption • Achieving consensus on communication protocols • Increase customer participation

Smart Grid - Key trends in Implementation Smart grid implementation is nascent stage, but Smart Grid - Key trends in Implementation Smart grid implementation is nascent stage, but has the potential of enabling connected home through wide roll out of TOU rates… In the long run utilities are not interested in branching out in HAN services. Instead their primary role would be to just register HAN devices Some utilities have decided to use a separate communication gateway to trigger demand response events There are very few demand response programs available. Those that exist centers mostly on curtailing HVAC usage during extreme weather condition Key Trends Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Roll out of non-smart grid real time pricing programs

Consumer Perceptions This research shows that residential customers are adopting energy management systems in Consumer Perceptions This research shows that residential customers are adopting energy management systems in the form of… Type of Energy Management System Currently Owned Functions Controlled by Home Automation and Control System • Programmable Thermostat 64% • In-home Display 14% • Home Automation System 4% Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Smart Meter and HAN Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Smart Meter and HAN Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Smart Meter Installations Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Smart Meter Installations Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Integrating Connected Home Devices to the Smart Grid Integrating connected home devices to the Integrating Connected Home Devices to the Smart Grid Integrating connected home devices to the grid is currently met by the following challenges… Selection of hardware devices Large installed base of AMR systems Deployment of smart grid technologies is regulatory driven with a long approval process. Keeping customers engaged Key Challenges Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Fragmented utility sector

Connected Home – Non-adoption Issues • • • Cost appears to be one of Connected Home – Non-adoption Issues • • • Cost appears to be one of the most important reasons behind non-adoption or delayed adoption. Cost-related factors will continue to impose a potential risk to adoption, although the perception of inconvenience has waned since 2009. Others include: o Limited clarity on energy savings o Inability to justify the cost of new hardware or services. Investment is either deferred until replacement needs, or availability of incentives. Upfront the price quoted appears to be a key criterion for customers in deciding which provider to select. Complexity of solutions made this criterion very important for decisionmaking. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Connected Home – Technology Initiatives Industry Segment Tech. Initiatives Zig. Bee, Z-Wave, Home devices, Connected Home – Technology Initiatives Industry Segment Tech. Initiatives Zig. Bee, Z-Wave, Home devices, smart Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, metering, security, remote Home. Plug, IEEE 1901 monitoring (Device Connectivity) Home devices, Entertainment, Consumer Electronics Entertainment, Communication devices Laptops and PCs, consumer electronic devices, home control devices Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) (Interoperability) Universal Plug and Play (UPn. P) (Interoperability) Areas of Focus Wi-Fi Alliance (Network Connectivity) Home. Plug. AV, Entertainment, consumer Home. PNA, electronics, home Home. Grid/G. hn appliances, home security (Interoperability; Device and controls Connectivity) Focus on home automation, controls, security, lighting, HVAC, etc; Zig. Bee and Z-Wave has relatively more endorsement and support for the industry participants Preferred standards for delivering products and services Consumer electronic, computing, and mobile device industries; Focus is on making connected, interoperable devices, including set-top boxes, PCs and handheld devices, work together over wired and wireless networks in the home; Supports underlying standards, including the Universal Plug and Play Defines how devices in the digital home interconnect and interoperate, including discovery and control of devices Can run on any network technology including Wi-Fi, coax, phone line, power line, Ethernet Driving the adoption of high-speed wireless local area networking, including certification of devices Wi-Fi Direct enables devices in a personal area network (PAN) to make secure, direct connections to one another Goal is to help service providers cost-effectively deploy new offerings, including Internet TV, allow consumer electronics manufacturers to network all types of entertainment, home automation, and security products throughout the house; and simplify consumers purchasing and installation processes; Network connectivity includes a range of networking standards encompassing IEEE 802. 3 and 802. 11, Home. PNA 3. 0, Mo. CA, Home. Plug. AV Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Connected Home – Opportunity Areas Consumer Opportunities Value Proposition to Participants Energy savings and Connected Home – Opportunity Areas Consumer Opportunities Value Proposition to Participants Energy savings and security Actionable data Multiple value-based solutions Rich set of functionalities Efficient and comfort-driven lifestyle Add-on services and Upgradeability Manage multiple services via one framework Participant Providing technologically upgraded solutions and more managed services and devices Revenue generation from partnerships Up-selling ability and reducing support cost Convergence of Telcos and service providers in delivering multi-screen experience Innovation and R&D prospects Creating parallel revenue streams and potentially new ones Expanding engagement terms with existing consumers Connected Home Technology, Product, and Service Provider • • • Take advantage of “sticky” nature of connected home services Use residential gateway as pass-through point for additional solutions Other usage - media servers, home management & support Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Whirlpool Smart Device Network Architecture Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Whirlpool Smart Device Network Architecture Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Motivating Factors There are very few residential customers on demand response programs. However, this Motivating Factors There are very few residential customers on demand response programs. However, this research shows that potential customers are drawn to demand response due to the prospects of cost savings… Motivating Factors for Using Demand-Response or Energy Management Devices (N=1, 013) Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Delivering to the Connected Home Active Market Participants Home Automation; Appliances, Other Home Devices; Delivering to the Connected Home Active Market Participants Home Automation; Appliances, Other Home Devices; EMS ISP; Communication Services; Entertainment Prevalent Model o o o Piecemeal service collaboration Traditional delivery network Limited or no-collaboration in technology Upfront product/technology pricing and some subscription-based Traditional recurrent revenue – repair/upgrades Subscription based model Bundled service delivery Duration-linked/contractual pricing Aggressively adding security and home monitoring Downward price pressures Active collaboration amongst players Convergence services slowly gaining importance Expected Changes o o Open collaboration for technology development Revenue share arrangements Centralized service delivery model Potential migration to subscription based pricing o o o Deliver more to retain customer loyalty Up-selling/adding services Mitigate challenges with partnership-based service delivery Steady revenue generation from convergence services o Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Achieving the Connected Home Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Achieving the Connected Home Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

The Home and Beyond from a Telecom perspective Impact of Smart Grid on Connected The Home and Beyond from a Telecom perspective Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Courtesy: Zig. Bee Alliance

Emerging Ecosystem Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Emerging Ecosystem Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Implementing Changes Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012 Implementing Changes Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

Key Takeaways The key takeaways of this research are the following: • Limited customer Key Takeaways The key takeaways of this research are the following: • Limited customer engagement and lack of personalization of solutions, as well as the lack of predictive and self-sensing capability of solutions, will continue to hinder value demonstrations in the connected home industry. • The industry horizon will continue to be dotted by both pure-play and turnkey players. Competitive advantages will, however, depend upon scalability of solutions to accommodate the emerging demand in technology integration. • The connected home’s relationship with energy is likely to be further stressed with the ability of such a home to integrate with the smart grid; however, optimized solutions in this area are currently only demonstrative in nature, with limited initiatives undertaken by the utility industry. • At present, the full service capabilities can be expected to come from Telcos and convergence service providers that are already well-entrenched within the connected home market by way of offering multi-point services to consumers. • Industry participants need to collaborate in a cohesive manner to make smart home solutions work together; however, both conceptual frameworks and technology development initiatives should work simultaneously toward this end. Impact of Smart Grid on Connected Homes 2012

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