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HOW TO BE A DETECTIVE 2009 USM Summer Gifted Grades 4 -6 Teacher: Melissa HOW TO BE A DETECTIVE 2009 USM Summer Gifted Grades 4 -6 Teacher: Melissa Pierce

Taylor’s Multiple Talents Parnes Creative Problem Solving Thinking Skills Renzulli’s Enrichment Triad Career Exploration Taylor’s Multiple Talents Parnes Creative Problem Solving Thinking Skills Renzulli’s Enrichment Triad Career Exploration Self-Directed Learning How To Be A Detective Product Development Research Creativity Communication Sharon and Sharon’s Group Investigations Group Dynamics

How to Be A Detective Day 1: Introduction: Criminal Investigations Grades 4 -6 Teacher: How to Be A Detective Day 1: Introduction: Criminal Investigations Grades 4 -6 Teacher: Melissa Pierce Objective Activities Evaluation Materials 1. 1 The student will identify his/her personal interests and learning styles. (Group Photograph) (Class agenda for the day. ) The students will complete individual interest and learning styles inventories. Student responses on inventory 1. 1 Interest/learning style inventory for each student, pencils 1. 2 The student will demonstrate an understanding of teacher expectations for appropriate classroom behavior. The teacher will guide a class discussion of standards (rules) for appropriate classroom behavior as students brainstorm qualities of a safe and risk free learning environment. These standards will be posted in the classroom for review throughout week. Teacher observation; student participation 1. 2 dry erase board, marker 1. 3 The student will demonstrate prior knowledge of scientific inquiry as it relates to criminal investigations. Students will complete a unit pre-test. Student responses on unit pre-test 1. 3 Unit pre-test for each student, pencils 1. 4 Ice Breaker: The student will participate in a “getting to know you activity”. The teacher will give each student a Clue Sheet and go over the directions for completing the sheet. Students will fill in the blanks in the statements indicating their physical appearance, personal interests, experiences, future goals, etc. The teacher will also instruct students not to write their name anywhere on the paper. After all students turn in their completed Clue Sheet, the teacher will hand an anonymous Clue Sheet to each student. The teacher will introduce the activity by saying “In this activity you will use your sharp detective skills to narrow down the list of suspects until you find the one person who matches all the clues you hold. Each student will then introduce their “suspect” by telling others in the class about that boy or girl. ” Teacher observation; student participation 1. 4 pencils 1. 5 The student will gain an understanding of procedures and terminology used in criminal investigations. The teacher will introduce students to basic topics of discussion surrounding criminal investigations. Students will complete Student Note-taking sheet. Student oral and written responses during class activity 1. 5 Computer, projector, pencils 1. 6 The student will develop a diagram of a crime scene area by observing the location of key reference points. The teacher will divide students into teams and direct their attention to a class simulated crime scene that has been divided into sections. The teacher will then give each group a photograph of their section and explain how they must carefully observe and sketch the fixed points of reference (walls, desks, windows, etc. ) without disturbing the evidence. The teacher will assemble a class crime scene map using group sketches. Group participation group sketches 1. 6 Simulated crime scene(s), pencils, drawing paper for each student, colored pencils, tape, photographs of simulated crime scene

How to Be A Detective Day 2 : Tools and Techniques for Gathering Evidence How to Be A Detective Day 2 : Tools and Techniques for Gathering Evidence Grades 4 -6 Teacher: Melissa Pierce Objective Activities Evaluation Materials 2. 1 The student will gain an understanding of how deductive skills are used to make inferences and draw conclusions during a criminal investigation. The teacher will introduce the lesson by having students view Dragonfly TV Kids Do Science – Forensics and discuss the tools and techniques used to gather evidence during the investigation. At this time, the teacher will have students begin filling out a Student Identification Card for use in future lessons. Student responses during discussion 2. 1 Computer, projector, internet, Student Identification Card for each student, measuring tape, pencils 2. 2 The student will recognize how each person’s fingerprint patterns are unique and can be used as evidence in a criminal investigation. The teacher will discuss how fingerprints are unique and can be used to connect a suspect to the crime scene. The teacher will then introduce fingerprint types and patterns using the following website: FBI Kids http: //www. cyberbee. com/whodunnit/crime. html http: //www. police. windsor. on. ca/Community%20 Services_new/Just%20 for%20 Kids/csi/fingerprint%20 information. htm The teacher tell children that they will become criminalists during the next activity and introduce students to a method for taking their own fingerprints using a pencil, tape, and paper. The students will practice this technique and make a set of visible fingerprints to include on their individual Student Identification Cards. http: //www. cyberbee. com/whodunnit/prints. html Teacher observation, students’ completed identification cards 2. 2 Pencils, tape, Student Identification Card for each student, computer, projector, internet 2. 3 The student will classify fingerprint patterns as arch, loop, or whorl. The teacher will review three basic fingerprint patterns, whorl, arch, and loop, using the following website: http: //www. cyberbee. com/whodunnit/classify. html. The teacher will then have each student place an inked fingerprint on a balloon and enlarge it to see the print pattern. Each student will then examine his/her fingerprint using a magnifier to identify the fingerprint pattern. Students will then present their identified fingerprint pattern to the class. The teacher tell students that person‘s fingerprint formula is the list of print classifications for one hand, from thumb to pinkie. The students will then find their own fingerprint formula using the “My Fingerprints” sheet. Student responses during class discussion and completed fingerprint formulas 2. 3 Magnifiers, light colored balloon for each student, fingerprinting ink pads, My Fingerprints sheet for each student 2. 4 The student will distinguish between visible and latent fingerprints. The teacher will have each student place one fingerprint on a clear piece of transparency film to create a latent fingerprint and ask students to discuss the difference between visible and latent fingerprints. The teacher will then explain that investigators must lightly dust a surface with a special type of powder in order to find latent fingerprints. The students will then identify, dust, and lift their own latent fingerprints using the procedures listed at the following website: http: //www. cyberbee. com/whodunnit/dusting. html Student participation and responses during class discussion 2. 4 6 sheets of clear transparency film, fingerprinting ink pads, 6 sheets of light colored construction paper, cocoa powder, small soft brush for each student, transparent tape 2. 5 The student will determine which suspect’s fingerprints match the prints found at the scene of an imaginary crime. The students will work in groups of 3 -4 to classify the fingerprint patterns and find the fingerprint formulas of suspects in the imaginary crime, Who Robbed the Safe. The students will determine which suspect’s prints match the prints found at the crime scene. The teacher will have student write a description of the evidence and why they believe it was a certain suspect’s prints on the safe. Student oral and written responses 2. 5 Pencils, paper, magnifiers, Who Robbed the Safe mystery, Suspects student sheet for each student

Arch Arch

Loop Loop

Whorl Whorl

How to Be A Detective Day 3: Forensic Science Careers Grades 4 -6 Teacher: How to Be A Detective Day 3: Forensic Science Careers Grades 4 -6 Teacher: Melissa Pierce Objective Activity Evaluation Materials 3. 1 The student will recognize the role science plays in a criminal investigation. The teacher will introduce the lesson by having students brainstorm topics of discussion from previous day’s lesson. The teacher will then introduce the current lesson by having students watch “Life Science: Forensics” from Discovery Education. While viewing the movie, students will complete the accompanying Discovery Education quiz for future reference. Student responses on quiz; teacher observation, student participation 3. 1 Pencils, computer, projector, internet 3. 2 The student will develop awareness of a variety of careers involving different branches of science within the field of forensic science. The teacher will introduce various Forensic Science Careers. Students will complete Student Note-taking sheets (See PDF). Guest Speaker(s) Teacher observation, student responses 3. 2 Pencils, computer, projector, internet 3. 3 The student will research a chosen forensic science career. For this activity, the teacher will regroup students by forensic interests. Each group will research a branch of forensic science, and prepare a class presentation and poster depicting the tools, techniques, types of evidence, etc. pertaining to that forensic career. Teacher observation, group participation, group product 3. 3 Assorted Forensic Science resource books, large poster board for each group (7), art materials, pencils, 3. 4 The student will demonstrate an understanding of the types of evidence, tools, and procedures used by specific forensic experts. Students will plan and write their own crime story that would involve the expertise of at least three forensic experts discussed in class. Crime stories should describe the evidence found and explain which expert would handle the specific pieces of evidence. Teacher observation, Student Crime Story writing product 3. 4 pencils 3. 5 The students will demonstrate an understanding of the procedures for collecting evidence during a criminal investigation. The teacher will review basic procedures for documenting a crime scene and review the class crime scene map. Student teams will revisit the crime scene to identify, list, and document the location of evidence found. (Evidence Location Chart). Students will carefully collect, store, and label the evidence; and document each object on the class crime scene map. Group participation, teacher observation, completed student work 3. 5 pencils, tape, 22+ unlined index cards tape measure, Ziploc bags

How to Be A Detective Teacher: Melissa Pierce Day 4 : Forensic Investigation Labs How to Be A Detective Teacher: Melissa Pierce Day 4 : Forensic Investigation Labs Grades 4 -6 Students will examine evidence, make inferences, and draw conclusions in order to solve a mock crime as they rotate through the following Forensic Investigation Labs: Document Analysis, Forensic Anthropology, Footprint Analysis, Mystery Powder Analysis, Ink Chromatography, DNA Analysis Open the PDF document below to view lesson plans for labs.

How to Be A Detective Teacher: Melissa Pierce Day 5 : Evaluations and Fingerprint How to Be A Detective Teacher: Melissa Pierce Day 5 : Evaluations and Fingerprint Art Grades 4 -6 Objective Activities Evaluation Materials 5. 1 The student will demonstrate knowledge gained during the unit by completing a post-test. The student will complete a unit post-test. Student responses on Unit post-test 5. 1 pencils, unit post-test for each student 5. 2 The student will reflect on their own effort and learning during the unit The student will complete a self-evaluation of unit progress. Student Selfevaluation 5. 2 student self-evaluation for each student, pencils 5. 3 The student will evaluate the Saturday Gifted Studies Program. The student will complete the program evaluation. Program evaluation 5. 3 program evaluation for each student, pencils 5. 4 The student will be recognized for his/her participation in the Saturday Gifted Studies Program. The teacher will present each student with a certificate recognizing program participation. Student participation 5. 4 Program Certificate for each child 5. 5 The student demonstrate flexibility and fluency by creating unique designs using his/her fingerprints. Students will decorate class photo mats by creating and applying unique fingerprint designs for each classmate. Group product 5. 5 heavy weight art paper for each student, ink pads, wet wipes, group photograph for each student (taken on first day)

Internet Resources http: //www. mysterynet. com - Online mysteries, mystery games, books, and resources Internet Resources http: //www. mysterynet. com - Online mysteries, mystery games, books, and resources http: //www. courttv. com/forensics_curriculum/index_registered. html - Court TV’s Forensics in the Classroom (FIC) Program http: //www. police. windsor. on. ca/Community%20 Services_new/Just%20 for%20 Kids/csi/fingerp rint%20 information. htm - Fingerprint match game http: //www. fbi. gov. /kids/6 th 12 th. htm - FBI for kids / online activities http: //www. yesnet. yk. ca/schools/webquests_themes/detectives_claire/detectives. html Resources links http: //library. thinkquest. org/04 oct/00206/index 1. htm - Reference site http: //www. virtualmuseum. ca/Exhibitions/Myst/en/rcmp/overview. html - Interactive Investigator http: //www. geocities. com/Athens/Atrium/5924/forensicscienceactivites. htm? 20098 http: //science. pppst. com/forensics. html - Forensic Science powerpoints http: //www. cyberbee. com/whodunnit/crime. html - Webquest http: //www. discoverychannel. co. uk/crime/what_is_forensics/index. shtml http: //www. nclark. net/Forensic. Chem#Links http: //221 bakerstreet. org/ - Sherlock Holmes American Academy of Forensic Science Millennium Mystery Madness - Mystery Writing http: //www. aafs. org/yfsf/index. htm - Young Forensic Scientist Forum http: //science. howstuffworks. com/forensic-science-channel. htm http: //science. uniserve. edu. au/school/resource/forensic. html http: //sciencespot. net/Media/Frns. Science/usforensics. pdf www. discoveryeducation. com

Teacher Resources Bibliography Carr, M. A. (2005). One-Hour Mysteries. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc Carr, Teacher Resources Bibliography Carr, M. A. (2005). One-Hour Mysteries. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc Carr, M. A. (1996). The Great Chocolate Caper. San Luis Obispo: Dandy Lion Publications. Gatlin, C. (2002). Mystery Science Case of the Missing Lunch. San Luis Obispo: Dandy Lion Publications. Hein, E. (2005). Partners in Crime. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Helen Hoffner, E. (2006). Writing and Reading Mysteries. (T. Edmunds, Ed. ) Westminster: Teacher Created Resources, Inc. Lawrence Hall of Science. (1994). Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) Mystery Festival. Berkeley: The Regents of the University of California. Schulz, K. (2006). Crime Scene Detective. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc. Schulz, K. K. (2007). Crime Scene Detective Arson. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc. Schulz, K. K. (2008). Crime Scene Detective Theft. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc. Schulz, K. L. (2008). CSI Expert! Forensic Science for Kids. Waco: Prufrock Press, Inc. Walker, P. , & Wood, E. (1999). Crime Scene Investigations. West Nyack, NY: The Center for Applied Research. Walker, P. , & Wood, E. (2006). Science Sleuths. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Wiese, J. (1996). Detective Science. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Life Science: Forensics http: //streaming. discoveryeducation. com/ http: //sciencespot. net/Media/Frns. Science/usforensics. pdf Life Science: Forensics http: //streaming. discoveryeducation. com/ http: //sciencespot. net/Media/Frns. Science/usforensics. pdf