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FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ANALYSIS OF THE 2004 SENIOR CERTIFICATE RESULTS (STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ANALYSIS OF THE 2004 SENIOR CERTIFICATE RESULTS (STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES AND THE WAY FORWARD) FEBRUARY 2005 1

OUTCOMES FOR PRESENTATION The presentation should promote understanding of the following: § The overall OUTCOMES FOR PRESENTATION The presentation should promote understanding of the following: § The overall results § The quality of the results § Equity (including performance of the girl child) § Subject performances § The mentor project § Challenges and solutions § Language issues § The way forward 2

OVERALL RESULTS The results this year were below our target of 85% but this OVERALL RESULTS The results this year were below our target of 85% but this needs to be seen in the context of the national drop from 73. 3% to 70. 7%, a drop of 2. 6%. The drop has caused national media speculation that the national papers were more difficult than in previous years. Whatever the case may be, Free State has risen from fourth province to third on the national rankings. The 79. 90% pass rate of 2003 dropped to 78. 7%, a drop of 1. 2%. The 2003 endorsement rate of 22. 8% also fell slightly to 22. 2%, still 3. 5% above the national figure of 18. 7%. 3

It is very important to note in the context of the results that the It is very important to note in the context of the results that the number of grade 12 learners writing the examination increased from 23 631 learners (2003) to 24 717 learners (2004). This suggests that the incidence of gate-keeping has been reduced, in line with our efforts in that regard. It also means that although the percentage pass was down, from 79. 9% to 78. 7%, more learners actually passed – 19 452 in 2004 as contrasted with 18 881 in 2003. This is an indicator of success as we as a provincial education department should be striving to successfully educate as many learners as possible and not be blinded only by statistical aspects. 4

POSITIVE INTERVENTIONS Once again we can be proud of an extremely professionally run, leak-free POSITIVE INTERVENTIONS Once again we can be proud of an extremely professionally run, leak-free examination. Systems in our province are producing a great measure of stability. We continued with Common Grade 12 exams in June (and in some districts in September as well), coupled with improved management of Continuous Assessment and this helped the stable performance. Easter, Winter and Spring schools continued in all districts, also contributing to the stable performance in relation to national results. 5

The innovative Holistic Intervention Programme continued, concentrating on schools with a pass rate below The innovative Holistic Intervention Programme continued, concentrating on schools with a pass rate below 40% - this has resulted in the province moving from 71 failing schools to only 11 in a period of three years. The mentors continued to bring stability and improved management and results to the schools they worked with. National interventions in the form of special attention given to Mathematics, the Sciences and History as well as various incentive schemes for teachers and scholars were successful in the Free State where we performed above average for these subjects. 6

Other successful interventions were: §Retraining of teachers in key subjects (e. g. Mathematics) § Other successful interventions were: §Retraining of teachers in key subjects (e. g. Mathematics) § Donor-funded interventions supported in terms of finances and human resources by the Flemish, Cuban, Canadian, US, Danish and German governments. § Continued support from Teacher Unions and local NGOs. § Splitting of teacher support into FET and GET sectors and increased numbers of LFs. This has enabled very concentrated and focused LF support, which shows in the continuous improvement in most subject averages. 7

§ Continued involvement of parents through SGBs § Ongoing contributions from Whole School Evaluation. § Continued involvement of parents through SGBs § Ongoing contributions from Whole School Evaluation. § Improved communication with schools. § Improved levels of dedication by thousands of teachers. § Continued improvement in logistical support to the system and more rigorous standards and processes in the appointment of new staff. § Quarterly reports to Umalusi, keeping them informed as to our interventions. As a result of this, they could understand accept various subject improvements. 8

RESULTS OF ALL NINE PROVINCES 9 RESULTS OF ALL NINE PROVINCES 9

THE OVERALL RESULTS Improvement shown by Free State Grade 12’s since 1999 The important THE OVERALL RESULTS Improvement shown by Free State Grade 12’s since 1999 The important aspect to note is the steady improvement against the national average – from 6% below in 1999 to 6. 6% above in 2003 to 8. 0%+ above in 2004. This is the true measure of the improvement. Not only have we improved the pass rate steadily but we have improved to such a point where we have progressed from a well below average province to an above average province. 10

OVERALL RESULTS con The maintenance of sound Free State results, exceeding the national pass OVERALL RESULTS con The maintenance of sound Free State results, exceeding the national pass rate by more and more each year, shows that our overall interventions are being successful as mentioned at the start of this presentation. ü The number of schools under 40% was 71 in 2001, 33 in 2002, 14 in 2003 and 11 in 2004 – a vast improvement indeed. ü It is also noteworthy that even our lowest performing district is above the national bench mark of 70%. ü 11

WORST PERFORMING SCHOOLS The large number of schools falling between 36 and 39% in WORST PERFORMING SCHOOLS The large number of schools falling between 36 and 39% in 2002 and 2003 targeted – a great improvement has been brought about. 12

DISTRICT PERFORMANCES District 2003 Pass % 2004 Pass % % Drop 2004 + or DISTRICT PERFORMANCES District 2003 Pass % 2004 Pass % % Drop 2004 + or – Free State Northern Free State 84. 48% 83. 34% -1. 14% +4. 64% Motheo 83. 40% 82. 46% -0. 94% +3. 76% Lejweleputswa 82. 13% 79. 76% -2. 37% +1. 06% Xhariep 80. 87% 77. 12% -3. 75% -0. 68% Thabo Mofutsanyana 70. 64% 70. 99% +0. 35% -6. 81% 13

QUALITY OF THE RESULTS The most important indicator of quality results is of course QUALITY OF THE RESULTS The most important indicator of quality results is of course the endorsement rate. This is has dropped from 22. 8% in 2003 to 22. 2% in 2004. This is not a good sign – the figure is too low for a stabilisation at this point to be healthy. The national figure also dropped from 19. 2% to 18. 7%. However, Umalusi have conceded that the national papers could have been more difficult this year – moderators and examiners were given such instructions. Only thorough research will indicate if this is so. 14

EQUITY - Girl Child: Mathematics (participation rate) Girls – increased from 48% in 2002, EQUITY - Girl Child: Mathematics (participation rate) Girls – increased from 48% in 2002, 49. 4% in 2003, to 51% in 2004 15

GIRL CHILD IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (participation rate) Girls have increased from 41% in 2002 GIRL CHILD IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE (participation rate) Girls have increased from 41% in 2002 to 43. 9% in 2003 and up to 47. 2% in 2004 16

GIRL CHILD IN BIOLOGY (participation rate) Girls have decreased from 52% (in 2002 and GIRL CHILD IN BIOLOGY (participation rate) Girls have decreased from 52% (in 2002 and 2003) to 50. 3% in 2004. 17

EQUITY – PERFORMANCE OF TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS An exciting development in 2003 and 2004 has EQUITY – PERFORMANCE OF TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS An exciting development in 2003 and 2004 has been the vastly improved performance of township schools. In 2003, of the 49 schools in the province that obtained a 100% pass rate (up from 23 in 2001), 9 were from the townships (3 in 2002). In 2004, 45 schools obtained 100%, with 8 from the townships. In 2003, of the 126 schools which obtained 90% or more (up from 72 in 2002), 54 were from the townships (up from 8 in 2002). In 2004, 129 schools obtained more than 90%, with 47 from the townships. This situation has stabilised. 18

SCHOOLS ABOVE 90% 19 SCHOOLS ABOVE 90% 19

This graph shows the subject averages of the three important commercial subjects, taken by This graph shows the subject averages of the three important commercial subjects, taken by a large proportion of the learners (12280 sat for Business Economics, 10967 for Accounting and 8694 for Economics – both grades). These subjects showed a phenomenal 20% average growth rate from 2003. 20

History showed a marked improvement from 2002 to 2003. It has stabilised at the History showed a marked improvement from 2002 to 2003. It has stabilised at the high 40% level. Geography continued with a somewhat disappointing average. A concentrated effort by all is required here as Geography remains an important subject for endorsement as it is found in two groups. Thus an improvement in this average and pass rate will see a further increase in the endorsement rate of the province. 21

MORE SUBJECT DETAILS Average %: Mathematics, Phys. Science, Biology 22 MORE SUBJECT DETAILS Average %: Mathematics, Phys. Science, Biology 22

THE MENTORS The province continues to be grateful to these 22 principals who took THE MENTORS The province continues to be grateful to these 22 principals who took 49 schools under their wing, while still guiding their 22 schools to excellent results. n They assisted 40 of these 71 schools (including their own schools) to continue to improve. n The schools they assisted achieved an average pass rate of 67. 8% - up from the low forty percents when the initiative started. n 23

MENTORS continued Of the 49 schools, 40 were above 50% and those below 50% MENTORS continued Of the 49 schools, 40 were above 50% and those below 50% mostly showed sound improvement. n Some schools e. g. Libertas Combined, Masopha SS, Lekgulo SS and Thapelong SS improved by more than 40%. n The province is truly proud of the improvement in these schools which started below 40% in 2001. n 24

GRADE 12 NUMBERS – MENTOR SCHOOLS It should be noted however that although the GRADE 12 NUMBERS – MENTOR SCHOOLS It should be noted however that although the general tendency in Free State schools was a 4. 6% increase in numbers, 38 mentor schools decreased in Grade 12 numbers while only 29 increased and 4 stayed constant. This could be as a result of learners naturally migrating to more successful schools, but could also be a perpetuation of gate-keeping. This will have to be carefully monitored over the next few years. 25

AFTER THE MENTORS It is of vital importance that the good work done by AFTER THE MENTORS It is of vital importance that the good work done by the mentors is perpetuated as part of the system. n It is thus essential that a skills transfer takes place and that the principals of the schools being assisted develop the skills to carry on once the mentors have left. n That this is taking place needs to be carefully monitored during the course of 2005. n If it is established that principals who have been guided for two or three years have not developed the necessary skills, firm action will need to be taken to ensure that the relevant learning community does not suffer once the mentors have been withdrawn. n 26

CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS The number of Grade 12 learners increased in 2004. The 7. CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS The number of Grade 12 learners increased in 2004. The 7. 5% drop of 2002 decreased to 4. 4% in 2003 which turned into a 4. 6% increase in 2004. This is an encouraging sign. n It would appear that the efforts to curb gatekeeping in Grades 11 and 10 which began in 2002 are starting to bear fruits. n However the drop out rates in grades 10 and 11 are still unacceptably high and much work needs to be done here to ensure that the system does not create a social problem in the striving for statistical improvements. n 27

FLOW THROUGH RATE n Although the number of grade 12 learners passing has increased, FLOW THROUGH RATE n Although the number of grade 12 learners passing has increased, it is alarming to note, from the EMIS Pass Rate per Grade survey that there are 62 424 learners at the start of Grade 10 but only 19 452 who pass Grade 12. n This indicates a flow through rate of only 31%, or a drop out rate of 69% from Grade 10 to the end of Grade 12. 28

CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS The subjects taken by more than 1 000 learners where the CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS The subjects taken by more than 1 000 learners where the average is less than 40% are as follows: Agricultural Science HG / SG; Biology SG; Economics HG / SG; Geography HG / SG; Physical Science SG; and Physiology SG. n These subjects will need very special inputs and interventions by all concerned, particularly Biology SG (7 500 learners), Economics (8 600 learners) and Geography (7 700 learners). n 29

Mathematics and the Sciences seem to be stabilising as a result of ongoing interventions. Mathematics and the Sciences seem to be stabilising as a result of ongoing interventions. n This however has not been the case with Geography. As this is an important subject for endorsement, we must come with innovative and creative solutions in 2005 as almost a third of our learners take Geography. n Biology and Physiology SG also need concerted attention during 2005 as these are popular choices. n Economics too needs special attention as the average dropped and the commercial subjects are growing in popularity. n 30

LANGUAGE OF LEARNING n There was a significant drop in both the average (48% LANGUAGE OF LEARNING n There was a significant drop in both the average (48% down to 42%) and the pass rate (98. 7% down to 93. 8%) in English Second Language. n This means that 93. 8% of the learners got above 75 / 300 – in other words, 6. 2% of the learners failed English SL outright in 2004 in comparison with 1. 3% in 2003. This had a negative effect on the overall pass rate of the province. 31

Lo. LT continued It is clear from research that stricter standards were applied in Lo. LT continued It is clear from research that stricter standards were applied in the national memorandum n Also the approach to CASS has played a major role – the mark allowed for the school by the LF is often based on the June common exam instead of on a school profile for that subject calculated over the last few years. n Concerted attention must be paid to English as a subject this year as a big drop in its pass rate will negatively affect the provincial pass rate. n 32

LANGUAGE OF LEARNING con English remains a provincial and a national problem in that LANGUAGE OF LEARNING con English remains a provincial and a national problem in that the vast majority of learners do not have the language skills to deal adequately with writing examinations in their second or third language. n The improvement of English for the purpose of teaching and learning is not just the responsibility of the language teachers but of every Grade 12 teacher. This needs to be reiterated on an annual basis. n 33

n n n English across the curriculum needs drastic attention in all schools. It n n n English across the curriculum needs drastic attention in all schools. It is recommended that schools draw up vocabulary lists for all subjects and that subject teachers test this vocabulary on a regular basis. Regular longer pieces of writing in English need to be given in all subjects and marked for language proficiency. The context of English teaching should be cross-curricular. The vocabulary and style of questions used in examination papers must be studied during the FET years (e. g. what exactly is meant by words such as `explain’, `compare’, `describe’ 34 etc. )

THE WAY FORWARD It is clear that the improvement we experienced during 2003 and THE WAY FORWARD It is clear that the improvement we experienced during 2003 and the stabilisation in 2004 is the result of outstanding teamwork with participation by all sectors of the system. n The stable results around 80% show that we now have the systemic capability and enough person power to produce quality results. n The question is – what should the Department do to maintain the momentum? n 35

WAY FORWARD continued § § § Continue giving subject and management support to all WAY FORWARD continued § § § Continue giving subject and management support to all schools with the necessary curriculum guidance. The problem subjects are being analysed and action plans developed. Ensure that all school timetables are according to national policy (this was identified as a problem area during the investigation into Section 21 schools). The necessary support in terms of textbooks ordered and delivered timeously. Continued high level of logistical support. The CASS Improvement Plan will sharpen and focus the application of CASS in all our schools. 36

Way Forward continued § § § § Continued focused support in terms of the Way Forward continued § § § § Continued focused support in terms of the Holistic Intervention Programme. Continued successful District interventions. Constant streamlining and improvement of subject packages offered. Move Grade 12 in an OBE direction by stressing insight. Constant linkage with and support for national and international interventions. Particular support for those schools identified as being at risk. Continue to run a quality assessment system with a secure Grade 12 examination of a high standard as was the case in 2004. 37

The End n. Questions n. Comments n. Queries 38 The End n. Questions n. Comments n. Queries 38