Скачать презентацию Fiber Optic Backbones Presented to Presented by Скачать презентацию Fiber Optic Backbones Presented to Presented by

daf713bbf6c854c7333ea89990047cb0.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 43

Fiber Optic Backbones Presented to Presented by Fiber Optic Backbones Presented to Presented by

What is Fiber Optics? In its simplest terms, fiber optics is a medium for What is Fiber Optics? In its simplest terms, fiber optics is a medium for carrying information from one point to another in the form of light. Unlike the copper form of transmission, fiber optics is not electrical in nature. A basic fiber optic system consists of a transmitting device, which generates the light signal; an optical fiber cable, which carries the light; and a receiver, which accepts the light signal transmitted. The fiber itself is passive and does not contain any active, generative properties

Advantages of Fiber Optic Cable? Today fiber optics is either the dominant medium or Advantages of Fiber Optic Cable? Today fiber optics is either the dominant medium or a logical choice for every communication system. 1. Fiber enhances the reliability of networks while simultaneously increasing transport capacity. Telcos (Phone & Cable) use fiber to connect all their central offices and long distance switches because it has thousands of times the bandwidth of copper wire and can carry signals hundreds of times further before needing a repeater Copper wire has limitations and is susceptible to interference. Fiber Optics has virtually unlimited potential and is immune to electromagnetic radiation (EMR). Security is greatly enhanced due to immunity from EMR

Types of Fiber Optics? Single-mode & Multi-mode Similarities Both types of fiber are 125 Types of Fiber Optics? Single-mode & Multi-mode Similarities Both types of fiber are 125 microns in outside diameter Both types of fiber are composed of thin strands of highly transparent glass Both types of fiber use infrared wavelengths which are outside the visible spectrum Fiber Optics

Types of Fiber Optics? Single-mode & Multi-mode Differences – Multimode Differences – Singlemode Light Types of Fiber Optics? Single-mode & Multi-mode Differences – Multimode Differences – Singlemode Light travels in the core in many rays, called modes LED sources at wavelengths of 850 and 1300 nm Bigger core (Almost always 62. 5 microns) Currently – Most common LAN fiber - Used only for short Fiber shrinks the core down so small that the light can only travel in one ray This increases the bandwidth to almost infinity Laser sources at 1300 and 1550 nm Small Core ( 9 microns) Currently – Used for Long Distances applications and outside plant distances and inside buildings Multimode Singlemode

Typical Construction Costs Underground Construction $50, 000 per mile for a 96 fiber cable Typical Construction Costs Underground Construction $50, 000 per mile for a 96 fiber cable Overhead Construction $35, 000 per mile for a 96 fiber cable

Installation Types (Underground vs. Overhead) Advantages/Disadvantages of Underground Installation 1. 2. 3. 4. No Installation Types (Underground vs. Overhead) Advantages/Disadvantages of Underground Installation 1. 2. 3. 4. No Annually Recurring Pole Attachment Fees Initial Construction Costs higher Rodents are a problem (Pulled conduit or armored cable can relieve issue) Earthquakes Advantages/Disadvantages of Overhead Installation 1. Initial Construction Costs less expensive than underground construction 2. Annually Recurring Pole Attachment Fees ($15 -45 per pole per year) 3. Ice Storms 4. Tornados

Fiber Models Fiber to the Curb (FTTC). Depends on copper wires or coaxial cable Fiber Models Fiber to the Curb (FTTC). Depends on copper wires or coaxial cable for last mile delivery Fiber to the Node (FTTN). Depends on copper wires or coaxial cable for last mile delivery

Fiber Models Hybrid fiber coaxial networks (HFC) Depends on copper wires or coaxial cable Fiber Models Hybrid fiber coaxial networks (HFC) Depends on copper wires or coaxial cable for last mile delivery Fiber to the Premises (FTTP). Fiber optic communications delivery in which the fiber is run directly into the premises

Active Optical Networks Active Optical Network (AON). Relies on active electronic equipment to distribute Active Optical Networks Active Optical Network (AON). Relies on active electronic equipment to distribute a signal. Each signal leaving the Central Office is for that particular customers use

Passive Optical Networks (PON) is a point-to-multipoint, fiber to the premises network architecture in Passive Optical Networks (PON) is a point-to-multipoint, fiber to the premises network architecture in which unpowered optical splitters are used to enable a single optical fiber to serve multiple premises PON vs. Point to Point Switched Ethernet 80 to 85 % of all FTTH deployments in North America are PON GPON (ITU standard) versus GE-PON (IEEE standard ) BPON or GPON, V/s GE-PON

Standards in Passive Optical Networks (PON) PONStandards: BPON • Defined in ITU G. 939. Standards in Passive Optical Networks (PON) PONStandards: BPON • Defined in ITU G. 939. 3 • ATM Protocol • 622 Mb/s Downstream • 155 Mb/s Upstream • 20 KM max from CO/HE to subscriber PONStandards: GPON • Defined in ITU G. 984. 2 • ATM or Ethernet (GEM) Protocol • 2. 488 Gb/s Downstream • 1. 244 Gb/s Upstream • 20 KM max from CO/HE to subscriber PONStandards: EPON • Defined in IEEE 802. 3 ah • Ethernet Protocol • 1. 25 Gb/s Downstream • 1. 25 Gb/s Upstream • 20 KM max from CO/HE to subscriber

Multiplexing Fiber Optics (GPON) Optical signal distributed from a central office from an optical Multiplexing Fiber Optics (GPON) Optical signal distributed from a central office from an optical network. At the customer premises optical network terminals (ONT’s) convert the optical signal into a electrical signal

Multiplexing Fiber Optics (GPON) Have two fibers but need more, Technology exists to multiplex Multiplexing Fiber Optics (GPON) Have two fibers but need more, Technology exists to multiplex fibers from one fiber up to 32 fibers with minimal db loss.

Why do Communities need a Fiber Optic Backbone? Provide for offsite backup Offset the Why do Communities need a Fiber Optic Backbone? Provide for offsite backup Offset the costs for future bandwidth needs Provide high speed connectivity by utilizing a combination of proposed fiber segments and wireless hops A number of studies rank the United States from 15 th to 24 th in penetration and broadband speed.

Small to Medium Businesses The status of broadband its impact on small business was Small to Medium Businesses The status of broadband its impact on small business was the subject of a recent Senate hearing. FCC Commissioner Michael Copps testified that in many cases small businesses can’t get connectivity and, when they can, it often is pricey. SOURCE: WWW. REDHERRING. COM

SOURCE: www. voip-news. com Bandwidth Comparison MCI / Verizon Qwest Communication s International Inc SOURCE: www. voip-news. com Bandwidth Comparison MCI / Verizon Qwest Communication s International Inc Sprint Speakeasy Inc Global Crossing DEDICATED T 1 Covad Savis Inc AT&T XO DEDICATED T 1 DEDICATED INTERNET ACCESS DEDICAT ED T 1 AT&T YAHOO HIGHSPE ED ELITE PACKAGE BUSINESS DSL Product DSL 1. 0 M OFFICE PLUS MOBILE BROADBA ND Basic Backbone Supplied DSL Wi. MAX T 1 T 1 DSL Down Speed Stream 1 Mbps 1. 5 to 7 Mbps 1 to 2 Mbps 3 Mbps, 1. 5 Mbps, 768 Kbps 3 Mbps, 1. 5 Mbps, 768 Kbps Up to 6 Mbps 1. 5 Mbps Up Speed Stream 1 Mbps 869 Kbps 500 to 700 Kbps 3 Mbps, 1. 5 Mbps 768 Kbps 1. 5 Mbps Guaranteed Service Commitment Standard SLA NO NO Standard SLA Robust SLA Standard SLA NO Standard SLA slower DSL options, faster solutions in Enterprise lineup T 1 and higher options available Additional Services Multiple network Can add voice Includes voice options Comments Relativel y high price Good Value Wi. MAX DSL, Bonded T 1, Vo. IP options Options Scale up from T 1 to OC 48 and carrier grade Options Scale up from T 1 to OC 192 Good Range of Options Good Service and Clear Options Good Service Robust Backbone Good value

Economic Development Affordable High Speed information access is key to economic development. The proposed Economic Development Affordable High Speed information access is key to economic development. The proposed project will help the Cities by: Attracting new companies into the area Retain existing employers Improve the overall Quality of life of all residents

Why build Fiber Backbones? The connection of the 21 st century The new economic Why build Fiber Backbones? The connection of the 21 st century The new economic generator The new infrastructure The new on / off ramp The connection to the electronic super worldwide highway

Speed Comparison Upload speed Download speed Dial- Up DSL Cable Satellite Fiber Optics 0 Speed Comparison Upload speed Download speed Dial- Up DSL Cable Satellite Fiber Optics 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 SPEED (MEGABITS PER SECOND) 40 45

WI-FI Implementation Key Issues: Bandwidth! As a minimum, provide a fiber optic backbone for WI-FI Implementation Key Issues: Bandwidth! As a minimum, provide a fiber optic backbone for WI-FI back-haul.

CASE STUDY HENDRICKS REGIONAL HEALTH (HRH) HOSPITAL DANVILLE, INDIANA CASE STUDY HENDRICKS REGIONAL HEALTH (HRH) HOSPITAL DANVILLE, INDIANA

Hendricks Regional Health Project The project was divided into three parts: Connect all four Hendricks Regional Health Project The project was divided into three parts: Connect all four campuses with a fiber optic backbone Connect backbone to the Data Center or Point of Presence (POP) for offsite backup and Internet access Procure system electronics

Henry Street Data Center - Point of Presence (POP) WORLDCOM GLOBAL CROSSING AT&T MCLEOD Henry Street Data Center - Point of Presence (POP) WORLDCOM GLOBAL CROSSING AT&T MCLEOD WILLIAMS TIME WARNER QUEST

Education Children must be given the tools to adequately prepare for entry into highly Education Children must be given the tools to adequately prepare for entry into highly competitive global market. Connecting Public Libraries Research Distance Learning

Security & Coordination Improving Public Safety (POLICE) Monitor Parks, Traffic, Schools Monitor Water Treatment Security & Coordination Improving Public Safety (POLICE) Monitor Parks, Traffic, Schools Monitor Water Treatment Plants Increase Coordination between various departments Hospitals Schools Fire / Water Government Offices Utilities

Electronics Connect HRH sites with a High-Speed Backbone ( 10 Giga bits/sec) Provide High Electronics Connect HRH sites with a High-Speed Backbone ( 10 Giga bits/sec) Provide High Speed data communications for: Medical imaging Radiology Telemedicine MRI

Hurdles in Building or Leasing dark Fibers Most providers will only lease bandwidth Some Hurdles in Building or Leasing dark Fibers Most providers will only lease bandwidth Some providers will Build fibers at your cost, give you a small number of fibers and keep the rest

Hurdles in Building or Leasing dark Fibers Must have a Competitive Local Exchange Carrier Hurdles in Building or Leasing dark Fibers Must have a Competitive Local Exchange Carrier License (CLEC) to be in the Public Right of Way Maximum IRU obtained will be 20 years, although the life of a fiber optic cable is 30 years Contract may be very restrictive

Competitive Local Exchange Carrier License (CLEC) State laws prohibit building fibers in the Public Competitive Local Exchange Carrier License (CLEC) State laws prohibit building fibers in the Public Right of Way unless you have a CLEC license Cannot Co-locate in central office of a telephone company

Disadvantages of not being a CLEC Cannot Build your own backbone; you can get Disadvantages of not being a CLEC Cannot Build your own backbone; you can get a 20 year IRU under a third party CLEC License. At the end of the IRU agreement the fiber reverts back to the original owner and the Organization has to then re-negotiate for use of the fiber. Every time you want to build a new segment of fiber, you will have to pay a CLEC licensed company for use of their license

Recommendations for building or leasing dark fibers Do your home work. Some providers with Recommendations for building or leasing dark fibers Do your home work. Some providers with excess fibers will lease you dark fibers Hire an experienced Telecommunications Attorney Hire an experienced consultant

Other Issues Co-locate agreement Bandwidth Purchase Maintenance Agreements Other Issues Co-locate agreement Bandwidth Purchase Maintenance Agreements

The HRH Business Model The HRH Business Model

HRH Business Model - Objectives Expand existing bandwidth for present and future needs Offset HRH Business Model - Objectives Expand existing bandwidth for present and future needs Offset costs for future bandwidth needs Enhance information security by providing offsite data storage

The HRH Business Model Purchase Bandwidth or buy/install fiber optics for the primary communication The HRH Business Model Purchase Bandwidth or buy/install fiber optics for the primary communication between campuses? ? ?

The HRH Business Model Cost of 96 fibers vs. 12 fibers Construction costs identical The HRH Business Model Cost of 96 fibers vs. 12 fibers Construction costs identical Cost/mile 96 fibers @ $. 90/ft $ 4, 752 Cost/mile 12 fibers @ $. 41/ft $ 2, 165 Cost differential for 18 miles $ 46, 566

Benefits of Business Model Allay construction costs by leasing spare fiber capacity to governmental/commercial Benefits of Business Model Allay construction costs by leasing spare fiber capacity to governmental/commercial entities Local governments can provide public safety and educational broadband access Commercial access to broadband can spur econom development Providing reasonable fiber optic access creates community good will.

Connect all HRH Hospitals 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. HRH (Danville, IN) HRH Connect all HRH Hospitals 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. HRH (Danville, IN) HRH (Plainfield, IN) HRH (Avon, IN) HRH (Brownsburg, IN) New HRH (Lizton, IN) Point of Presence (Indianapolis, Indiana) Hendricks Regional Health (Existing Fiber Optic System) Proposed New Fiber Optic Construction

How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE INDIVIDUAL TOWN How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE INDIVIDUAL TOWN BACKBONES USING HRH FOR TRANSPORT TO POP FUTURE CONSTRUCTION

How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE Danville Fiber How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE Danville Fiber Optic Backbone FUTURE CONSTRUCTION

How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE Plainfield Fiber How the HRH Model has become a County Wide Network HRH BACKBONE Plainfield Fiber Optic Backbone FUTURE CONSTRUCTION

Questions? Questions?