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Every Child Ready to Read @ Your Library® Early Literacy Workshop For Four- and Every Child Ready to Read @ Your Library® Early Literacy Workshop For Four- and Five-Year-Olds

For the Presenter This powerpoint presentation has been developed to serve two purposes: – For the Presenter This powerpoint presentation has been developed to serve two purposes: – To help you, the presenter in developing your presentation, to see how it flows – To use with participants in your workshop if you feel it is appropriate. In some settings a powerpoint presentation can be overwhelming or off-putting. Know your group; use your judgment. • • You are encouraged to change examples of books and rhymes to ones that illustrate the point and are comfortable to you. [ ] = note to presenter “Supplemental Information” noted in the Notes Area of the presentation. You’ll find additional ideas and information which you may include if you have time, or if the participants show particular interest in that area. Supplemental slides can be hidden. Then they will not be seen during the presentation, but remain in the file.

Materials Needed For Presenter: • • • Overhead (optional) DVD Projector or VCR player Materials Needed For Presenter: • • • Overhead (optional) DVD Projector or VCR player Video/dvd of Phonological Awareness games Foam letters (optional) 3 items, two alike, one different (optional) Say It Slow/Fast demonstration cards Supplemental (Choose your own to illustrate what is in the script) • Flannel board of Mother, Mother I Want Another • Mother, Mother I Want Another (Polushkin) • Alphabatics (Mac. Donald) • Lot at the End of the Block (Lewis) • Gunniwolf (Harper) Examples: (Choose your own to illustrate what is in the script) • • • Something from Nothing (Gilman) Napping House (Wood) Jump, Frog, Jump (Kalan) Turtle Splash! Countdown at the Pond (Falwell) Busy Buzzing Bumblebees and Other Tongue Twisters (Schwartz) Chicka Boom (Martin Jr. ) Potluck (Shelby) I Love Trains (Sturges) Name Game on album Shakin’ a Tailfeather by Taj Mahal Handouts: • Parent's Guide to Early Literacy: Pre-Readers, 4 and 5 -Year Olds • Language of Literacy (optional) • Letter-Sounds for Letter Day Activities (optional) • Letter Day sheet • Say It Slow—Say It Fast • Willowby, Wallowby (or other rhyme)

The More We Get Together Oh, the more we get together, together Oh, the The More We Get Together Oh, the more we get together, together Oh, the more we get together The happier we’ll be. For your friends are my friends And my friends are your friends. Oh, the more we get together The happier we’ll be.

YOU are your child’s first teacher • Children begin to get ready to read YOU are your child’s first teacher • Children begin to get ready to read long before they start school. • You know your children best. • Children learn best by doing things, and love to do things with YOU. • Young children often have short attention spans and enjoy repeating favorite activities. • YOU know your children well and can take advantage of times when the child is “in the mood, ” ready to learn.

What Do Four- and Five-Year-Olds Do? What Do Four- and Five-Year-Olds Do?

WHAT IS EARLY LITERACY? WHAT IS EARLY LITERACY?

EARLY LITERACY Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they EARLY LITERACY Early literacy is what children know about reading and writing before they can actually read or write.

SIX SKILLS TO GET READY TO READ • • • Print Motivation Phonological Awareness SIX SKILLS TO GET READY TO READ • • • Print Motivation Phonological Awareness Vocabulary Narrative Skills Print Awareness Letter Knowledge

Print Motivation child’s interest in and enjoyment of books Children who enjoy books and Print Motivation child’s interest in and enjoyment of books Children who enjoy books and reading will read more. Children become good readers by practicing.

? ? ? Vocabulary ? ? ? knowing the names of things helps children ? ? ? Vocabulary ? ? ? knowing the names of things helps children understand what they read helps children recognize words when they try to sound them out

Narrative Skills the ability to describe things and events, and to tell stories helps Narrative Skills the ability to describe things and events, and to tell stories helps children understand what they read

Supplemental Information Supplemental Information

Dialogic or “Hear and Say” Reading Dialogic or “Hear and Say” Reading

Print Awareness noticing print everywhere knowing how we follow the words on a page, Print Awareness noticing print everywhere knowing how we follow the words on a page, knowing how to handle a book helps children feel comfortable with books so they can concentrate on reading

Letter Knowledge knowing that letters are different from each other, that they have different Letter Knowledge knowing that letters are different from each other, that they have different names and sounds helps children understand that words are made of smaller parts, and to know the names of those parts

Supplemental Information Supplemental Information

Phonological Awareness the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words Phonological Awareness the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words helps children sound out words as they begin to read

Language of Literacy Phoneme The smallest part of spoken language that makes a difference Language of Literacy Phoneme The smallest part of spoken language that makes a difference in the meaning of words. English has about 41 phonemes. The word “if” has two phonemes (/i/ /f/). The word “check” has three phonemes (/ch/ /e/ /ck/). Sometimes one phoneme is represented by more than one letter. Phonemic Awareness The ability to hear, identify, and manipulate the individual sounds (phonemes) in spoken words. Phonological Awareness The understanding that spoken language is made up of individual and separate sounds. A broad term that includes phonemic awareness in addition to work with rhymes, words, syllables, and beginning sounds. Grapheme The smallest part of written language that represents a phoneme in the spelling of a word. A grapheme may be just one letter, such as b, f, p, s, or several letters such as ch, sh, ea, igh. Phonics The understanding that there is a predictable relationship between phonemes (the sounds of the spoken language) and graphemes (the letters and spellings that represent those sounds in written language). Syllable A word part that contains a vowel or, in spoken language, a vowel sound. From Put Reading First: The Research Building Blocks for Teaching Children to Read , U. S. Department of Education, 2001. Downloadable at National Institute for Literacy www. nifl. gov

Print Motivation Phonological Awareness a child’s interest in and enjoyment of books. Vocabulary the Print Motivation Phonological Awareness a child’s interest in and enjoyment of books. Vocabulary the ability to hear and play with the smaller sounds in words. Narrative Skills the ability to describe things and events and to tell stories. knowing the names of things. What you do helps your child get ready to read. Letter Knowledge learning to name letters, knowing they have sounds, and recognizing them everywhere. Print Awareness noticing print, knowing how to handle a book, and how to follow the written words on a page.

Games for Phonological Awareness Games for Phonological Awareness

Say It Slow Say It Fast Puzzle Game Say It Slow Say It Fast Puzzle Game

Say It Slow/Say It Fast Level 1: Imitation GOAL: To improve your child’s ability Say It Slow/Say It Fast Level 1: Imitation GOAL: To improve your child’s ability to “take words apart” (say it slowly) and put them “back together” (say it fast). STEPS: 1. Choose a two-syllable word puzzle. Show your child the whole picture and say word. Have your child imitate the word. 2. Break word apart; say it slowly. Separate the two pieces as you say the word again slowly. 3. Point to each part of the picture as you say the parts. Be sure the picture is facing the child. 4. Ask your child to say each part after you as you hold up piece of picture. When your child says the syllable, hand him or her that piece of the puzzle. 5. Practice saying the word “fast” (normally) and then “slowly” (broken apart) as you take apart and put the puzzle together. 6. After your child can imitate one word this way, practice all the two-syllable words this way, one at a time.

Say It Slow/Say It Fast Level 2: Production STEPS 1. Lay out the puzzle Say It Slow/Say It Fast Level 2: Production STEPS 1. Lay out the puzzle of a word that your child has already practiced and say, “Can you say this word slowly? ” 2. Take the puzzle apart and ask your child to say the word “broken apart”. Give help as needed. 3. When your child is able to say the words “broken apart” without your help, try some of the following: * * * Lay out three puzzles of two-syllable words that your child has practiced. Mix up the pieces and ask him/her to put the puzzles together and tell you the word normally and broken apart. Lay out three two-syllable word puzzles (put together) and have your child say one of the words slowly while you try to “guess” which one your child is saying. Ask your child to put the words together backwards and make a “silly” word out of it. Introduce three-syllable word picture puzzles.

Letter Day Game Letter Day Game

Same or different? Same or different?

LETTER-SOUNDS FOR LETTER DAY ACTIVITIES The following is the rough order of sounds as LETTER-SOUNDS FOR LETTER DAY ACTIVITIES The following is the rough order of sounds as they develop in children’s speech. Start with these letter-sounds: w, p, b, d, t, m, n, h, y Do these letter-sounds last: j, l, r Remember that this activity is teaching your child to listen for the sounds in words. Often alphabet books choose pictures to depict a letter by the way it is spelled not the way it sounds.

Letter. Sound Sample Words W water, worm, wet, window F food, fork, fox, fan Letter. Sound Sample Words W water, worm, wet, window F food, fork, fox, fan P pot, paint, pear, pool V B boy, bed, bike, ball S violin, vase, vacuum sock, soap, sun, spoon D T door, dime, doll, dog toe, toy, truck, tree Z G M mop, mail, milk, man K N H net, nap, neck, nose house, hill, horse, C J zoo, zebra, zipper goat, gate, game, grass kite, kangaroo, king, kiss cat, cake, cookie, car juice, jar, jacks, jelly

More Letter Sound Games More Letter Sound Games

Helpful Hints Keeping It Fun • Children will enjoy these games most if they Helpful Hints Keeping It Fun • Children will enjoy these games most if they are not too easy or too difficult. • Pay close attention to what your child can and cannot do. • Follow your child’s lead. Use toys, books, and words that interest your child. • Have fun! Always stop before you or your child become frustrated. • Be helpful. Praise your child for all efforts even if the answers are not always correct. Teach the correct answer but do not expect perfection. • Do not correct speech errors at this time. The goal is to learn that words can come apart, not perfect speech. • Encourage the whole family to play!

Supplemental Information Supplemental Information

Have fun! Have fun!