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English Exams An Introduction Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the English Exams An Introduction Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 1

Exams Summary • You will sit 2 papers that will assess your reading and Exams Summary • You will sit 2 papers that will assess your reading and your writing skills. • Paper 1 English in the Daily World – 1 hr exam – Read answer 4 questions based on non fiction texts – Worth 40 marks (30% GCSE Grade) • Paper 2 English in the Daily World – 1 hr exam (straight after paper 1) – Writing information and ideas in various forms such as: newspaper article, leaflet, report, letter etc. – Worth 40 marks (30% GCSE grade) Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 2

Paper 1 - Reading Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the Paper 1 - Reading Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. • In this exam you will have to read 2 examples of non fiction texts – this means it will not be a story. • These could be examples of web pages, news articles, leaflets or advertisements. • You cannot predict what will come up from one year to the next, but the skills needed to answer the questions can be practiced. 3

Main Skills Needed • location and recognition (finding info and putting it in your Main Skills Needed • location and recognition (finding info and putting it in your own words) • Inference (reading between the lines and interpreting what is written. ) • Appreciating style (analysing the way a writer writes) • Comparing Texts (identifying and explaining the similarities and differences between texts. ) Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 4

Question Types • Which skill do you think each of these question types might Question Types • Which skill do you think each of these question types might need? – Compare text A and B using the following headings. – What impression of teenagers does the writer give? – How does the writer make healthy eating sound appealing? – What reason does the article give to show boxing is dangerous? Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 5

1. Locating and retrieving information • List reasons or details/Make a list of. . 1. Locating and retrieving information • List reasons or details/Make a list of. . . • According to this text or writer, how or what or why. . . ? • Explain how and/or why. . . Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 6

 • Questions that ask you to locate and retrieve information are usually opportunities • Questions that ask you to locate and retrieve information are usually opportunities to gain marks quickly, provided you read the passage carefully and closely. If this type of question appears, it is usually the first question in unit 1. Often you will simply be asked to list five or ten relevant details from the passage. • 'List' questions typically. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 7

If you are asked to 'make a list' or 'list’ then you should do If you are asked to 'make a list' or 'list’ then you should do exactly that. If you are asked for ten points, include eleven or twelve if you can. You may have got something wrong or made the same point twice, but an extra point or two gives you a safety net. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 8

Before you start. . . • DO NOT simply copy out the bulk in Before you start. . . • DO NOT simply copy out the bulk in the first paragraph. • DO NOT copy the same thing twice, just in different words. • DO keep it concise • DO choose the information that the question asks you to locate. • DO NOT explain/analyse your points. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 9

List five details from the article that suggest polar bears are dangerous. (5) Outcomes: List five details from the article that suggest polar bears are dangerous. (5) Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 10

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 • Your answer could be written as a bullet point list, as below. • Your answer could be written as a bullet point list, as below. • They are 'among the most dangerous predators on earth'. • They are fast. • They are strong. • They are unpredictable. • They weigh up to 600 kg. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 12

Always check you are answering exactly the question that is being asked. Highlighting the Always check you are answering exactly the question that is being asked. Highlighting the key words or phrase in the question can keep you on track. 13

More Practice • Look at the newspaper article, “Children need risk to thrive. . More Practice • Look at the newspaper article, “Children need risk to thrive. . . ” on the next page. • A 1. List ten facts the article tells the reader about Simon Woodroffe. [10] 14

Children need risk to thrive as adults, says Dragons’ Den judge We are in Children need risk to thrive as adults, says Dragons’ Den judge We are in danger of creating a generation of children wrapped in cotton wool and afraid to take risks, a leading businessman has claimed. Simon Woodroffe, founder of the Yo! Sushi restaurant chain and a judge on the BBC show Dragons’ Den, has argued that children must be exposed to more danger to help them to cope with the daily risk-taking required in the modern business world. He said that he was in despair when he heard that some schools were no longer taking pupils on challenging activities like canoeing or camping in case they injured themselves. “My greatest fear is our children will grow up expecting to be looked after their whole lives. We need to encourage children to push themselves, to go beyond their limits, in order to build a nation of bold and confident people. We need them to become independent and self reliant. ” Mr Woodroffe, 56, who was awarded the OBE in 2006, is patron of the Go 4 It awards for schools, run by the Heads, Teachers and Industry (HTI) enterprise, to encourage qualities like sensible risk-taking, competitiveness and determination to succeed among pupils. The awards were launched last year in response to concerns of employers over the ‘cotton-wool kids’ culture. HTI leaders were horrified at last year’s Go 4 It awards to discover that one of the winning schools was not allowed to attend because the local authority thought the journey to London would be too risky for the pupils. There is increasing concern that health and safety is stifling schools. Some schools have banned traditional playground games such as conkers, snowball fights and cartwheeling. Some schools have even prohibited pupils from doing the backstroke in swimming lessons. Mr Woodroffe said: “We need to expose ourselves to danger to build the muscles of selfprotection. If you don’t learn to protect yourself when you are young, you may end up in even more danger later on. ” Mr Woodroffe left school at 16 with no qualifications, and spent 30 years in the entertainment business. He was a lighting technician for Led Zeppelin before he went on to help stage the Live Aid concert in 1985. He went into television shows with the BBC and Sky before setting up Yo! Sushi in 1997. A new venture to produce extreme sport videos in the 1990 s was a flop. He said, however, that he had not been afraid to fail and neither should children. His latest business venture has been to open an international chain of hotels called ‘Yotel’. The Go 4 It awards will be presented tonight to schools which have developed a positive approach to risk. One winner is Langdale, a primary school in Cumbria, where pupils have just swum across Lake Windermere, and take geography lessons up mountains. Meanwhile, the Children’s Society has conducted a two-year inquiry about the pressure and restrictions on young people. It found that the average distance a nine-year-old girl is free to wander from her front door has been reduced from 840 metres in 1970 to 280 in 1997. The limit today appears to be the bottom of the garden, the charity said. It also found that today only 9% of primary school-age children make the journey from home to 15 school on their own, compared to 80% in 1970.

Award one mark for each correct fact, up to a maximum of 10. • Award one mark for each correct fact, up to a maximum of 10. • He is a leading businessman • He is the founder of 'Yo! Sushi' restaurant chain • He is a judge on 'Dragon's Den' • He is 56 • He was awarded the OBE in 2006 • He is patron of the Go 4 It awards for schools • He left school at 16 • He gained few qualifications at school • He spent 30 years in the entertainment business • He was a lighting technician for Led Zeppelin • He helped to stage the Live Aid concert in 1985 • He was involved in TV shows with the BBC and Sky • His attempt to produce extreme sports videos was a flop • He has opened an international chain of hotels called 'Yotel' 16

Inference Questions • These questions are usually about a certain impression, image or attitude Inference Questions • These questions are usually about a certain impression, image or attitude created in a text. • They require you to take information from the text and interpret what the writer really means. • Look at the following images – What are your impressions of the people? Why? Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 17

Impressions and images Creating Inferences • What impression do you get of the writer/an Impressions and images Creating Inferences • What impression do you get of the writer/an organisation /people? • What image does this text create of the writer/an organisation /people? • What are the writer’s attitudes to…? Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 18

Hints and Tips • This question is usually asking about the writer’s viewpoint or Hints and Tips • This question is usually asking about the writer’s viewpoint or impression. It is always a good start to state if they have a positive or negative viewpoint or impression. • Always support your answer with evidence from the text, i. e. quotation. • You cannot simply list in this answer you must expand on answers, picking out the relevant info and showing that you understand the text. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 19

Jamie Oliver • Read the extracts about Jamie Oliver on the following slide, and Jamie Oliver • Read the extracts about Jamie Oliver on the following slide, and try to answer this question: What impressions of Jamie Oliver do you get from these 2 extracts? Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 20

 • • • Why we all hate Jamie Oliver - by Mecca Ibrahim • • • Why we all hate Jamie Oliver - by Mecca Ibrahim Who is Jamie Oliver? Well, if you live in the USA there’s a fair chance you haven’t heard of him. If you live in the UK and you have a TV, you will see this cockney ‘chef’ appearing on countless adverts for Sainsbury’s supermarket as well as in his own food programmes. Jamie has this great ability to cause emotions in people. Love him or hate him, you can’t really be indifferent to him. My husband liked his first TV series and I really liked his second TV series. By the third series we both wanted to throw the trusty food mixer at the TV. • • How Jamie saved me, by a new-born chef TV chef Jamie Oliver taught 15 jobless teenagers how to run a restaurant. Tim Siadatan was one of the nine star pupils. Oliver has gambled £ 1. 3 million of his own money to make the scheme a success, and the programme showed all the qualities that make the chef admirable: he is hard-working, loyal, responsible, generous and sympathetic, but even these qualities did not guarantee success. Viewers watched in incredulity as the students appeared to rebel against 27 -year-old Oliver’s attempts to persuade them into working, opting instead to accuse him of using them to forward his own career, and often not turning up for work at all. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 21

Practice • Read the article on reality TV and follow the guide to answer Practice • Read the article on reality TV and follow the guide to answer this question: What impressions of reality television shows does the writer create? • The writer creates a negative impression of these shows. Having read the article, list any words or phrases (including the headline) of the article that help to create this impression, and say what image they suggest. For example, the use of the word ‘artificial' in the headline suggests they are fake, false and not a true representation of ‘real’ people. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 22

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Word/Phrase from Text ‘instantly forgettable wannabes. ’ Impression it gives to the reader. Suggests Word/Phrase from Text ‘instantly forgettable wannabes. ’ Impression it gives to the reader. Suggests that they have no skill or talent and simply want to be famous. Also implies that they are have nothing unique or special about them. ‘Limited shelf life. ’ Suggests that the so called ‘celebrity’ programmes are for washed up celebrities. They have no worth. 24

Hints and Tips • To answer this question you should state what is said Hints and Tips • To answer this question you should state what is said in the text and how it is said by the writer. This will ensure that you have interpreted the language and shown the examiner inference skills. • Starter: The writer gives a negative impression of reality t. v. shows and does not agree with people becoming celebrities because they are in a show. He calls these people ‘instantly forgettable wannabes. ’ This suggests that he dislikes these people and they simply want to be celebrities, but do not have the qualities or talent of any kind to be remembered. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 25

Now you try… • Finish the answer I have started for you. • Remember Now you try… • Finish the answer I have started for you. • Remember to track the text (use connectives: firstly, secondly etc) • Use the key word from the question – Impression! • For a C grade you are looking to get 5 – 7 explained points from the text. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 26

2 Skills Down, 2 to Go! • Now you know how to successfully track 2 Skills Down, 2 to Go! • Now you know how to successfully track a text for clues and evidence and how to interpret ideas in a text, you are now going to work on your timing. • Read answer the first 2 questions of this past paper. • You will have a total of 30 mins to answer both. Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 27

Questions • Look at the first page of the magazine article, ‘The very special Questions • Look at the first page of the magazine article, ‘The very special young lady in Simon Cowell’s life’. • 1. List ten things that you find out about Sian Tolfree. [10] • Now look at the second page (from ‘Joining Sian in her chat. . ’). • 2. What do you learn about Simon Cowell’s friendship with Sian and her family? [10] 28

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Assessment – – – – – Award one mark for each correct answer. • Assessment – – – – – Award one mark for each correct answer. • Simon Cowell calls her `Trouble` • She shares a ‘special bond’ with Simon Cowell / good friend • she is 14 years old • she first met Simon Cowell when she was seven / known him for seven years • she met Cheryl Cole, Kate Moss, Leona Lewis • she was treated like 'the belle of the ball' at Simon’s party / was invited to Simon Cowell’s party • she spends time at a children’s hospice • she spent five months at London’s Royal Brompton Hospital • she has spent four months on a life support machine • she has had 15 heart operations / major heart surgery • she spent a lot of time watching Pop Idol whilst recovering / enjoys Simon Cowell’s antics / Simon Cowell was her favourite judge • she asked Simon Cowell if she could audition / sang `Reach for the Stars` • she has Di. George syndrome • she suffers from major heart and lung problems • she was invited to choose any clothes she wanted, to go to Simon’s 50 th birthday party • she chose to go to the party in 'something glittery' Outcomes: To know and practice the skills needed for the exams. 30

What do you learn about Simon Cowell’s friendship with Sian and her family? [10] What do you learn about Simon Cowell’s friendship with Sian and her family? [10] 0 -1 mark - Question not attempted or candidates struggle to engage with the text and/or question. Give 2 -4 marks, according to quality, to those who copy unselectively, make unsupported assertions or make simple comments with occasional references to the text. Give 5 -7 marks, according to quality, to those who will make some simple comments/inferences and some appropriate selection from the text. Give 8 -10 marks, according to quality, to those who make valid comments based on appropriate detail from the text. These responses will track the text securely. Some points candidates may explore: Overview/Comments/Inferences The relationship they have is: • close / strong / good; • fun / playful; • important to Sian and the family etc. His behaviour towards her and her family is: • caring / kind / thoughtful / concerned; • helpful / generous / supportive; • reliable / loyal / always there for her etc. Textual details candidates may use and/or explore: • he has a 'natural, jokey relationship' with them; • he had given Sian his dressing room when she went to see X Factor; • he regularly sent emails and cards to ask how she was – showed his concern; • Sian now goes to watch the X Factor every year – sometimes twice a year; • they tease each other when they are together; • he told Sian’s mother to ask if she needed anything – he wanted to help; • he has never let her down; • he always responds quickly to Sian’s phone calls or texts; • he’s shown 'huge generosity' to the family; • he’s prepared to pay for Sian’s treatment in the US if it becomes necessary; • he’s told the family he 'will do anything' to help them; • his friendship has helped Sian’s `spirit`; • his friendship with the family has touched others too – godparents and locals; 31 • his friendship has made the family 'feel like millionaires'.

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Homework • Write an identify and retrieve question on the Bananas article – worth Homework • Write an identify and retrieve question on the Bananas article – worth 10 marks • Answer the question! 33

Analysis of Writer’s Style. How Questions • In this unit I will: • learn Analysis of Writer’s Style. How Questions • In this unit I will: • learn the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to influence readers • learn the various forms of persuasion • analyse answers from other students • practice answering this type of question. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 34 influence readers

How Questions • These questions in the exam will require you to analyse the How Questions • These questions in the exam will require you to analyse the methods used by the writer who is trying to convey a certain point of view or attitude. • Typical questions: – How does the writer/article/leaflet encourage/persuade…? – How does the writer convey a certain attitude/idea/image? • The key word in this question is how and it means P. E. E. ING on your work. 35

 • Persuasive writers can use a variety of techniques. • The exam questions • Persuasive writers can use a variety of techniques. • The exam questions will almost certainly require analysis of how a particular text is attempting to influence its audience. It could be selling a product or promoting an idea or a point of view, but writing is never really neutral, particularly this kind of writing. • As you read each text, try to establish a sense not only of its topic (what it is about) but also of the writer's viewpoint (what the writer really thinks about the topic). Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 36 influence readers

The best way to proceed is to 'track' the text, taking each paragraph or The best way to proceed is to 'track' the text, taking each paragraph or section in turn. The most important thing is to ask yourself: 'What is the intention behind this detail? ', 'What is the effect? ' Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 37 influence readers

Approach • Consider: - – What is written + How it is written + Approach • Consider: - – What is written + How it is written + intended effect of the words/image/headline. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 38 influence readers

This is intended to be an analysis of how a writer tries to persuade. This is intended to be an analysis of how a writer tries to persuade. It is not asking whether you agree or not. You must look at what the writer is doing and resist the temptation to give your own views on the issue. The question is not: 'How does the writer make you want to read on? ' So don't answer that question instead of the actual one. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 39 influence readers

Approach • You should look at 3 things when answering this question: – Headline Approach • You should look at 3 things when answering this question: – Headline – Images – Language Content • Have a look at this advert and let’s see what we can analyse. • Q. How does the advertisement make the car sound appealing? Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 40 influence readers

Headlines and titles • All headlines and titles try to `catch the eye' or Headlines and titles • All headlines and titles try to `catch the eye' or 'grab the attention', so you will get little or no credit given if that is all you say in an exam answer. • It is true that headlines are used to draw the reader in, but you must describe how a particular headline or title makes its impact. You should be making points that apply only to the particular headline you are referring to. • You need to think about its intended effect on the reader. Ask yourself: Why this headline? What is it achieving? How? Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 41 influence readers

 • Headlines are often used to clearly introduce a topic, but sometimes they • Headlines are often used to clearly introduce a topic, but sometimes they withhold information in an attempt to intrigue, or even mislead, the reader. • Some common features of headlines and titles are: • direct address (the use of 'you' to engage the reader as an individual) • questions (sometimes rhetorical but often direct) • sensational, dramatic or emotive language for impact • play on words (often witty: puns, alliteration, rhyme, etc). Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 42 influence readers

Avoid saying 'it makes you want to read on'. The effect of a headline Avoid saying 'it makes you want to read on'. The effect of a headline can be better described using words such as 'provocative', 'arresting', 'challenging', 'intriguing', 'tasteless', 'funny' or 'sensational'. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 43 influence readers

Analysing Pictures When looking at pictures, ask yourself the following. Why this picture? What Analysing Pictures When looking at pictures, ask yourself the following. Why this picture? What is its effect? Is each picture giving the same message? Do the pictures work together to reinforce the message of the text? 4. Do the pictures give different messages? If so, why? 5. Remember, a picture will usually link to the headline and the main text. • 1. 2. 3. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 44 influence readers

Analysing. Language • When asked ‘How’ does an article or writer do something the Analysing. Language • When asked ‘How’ does an article or writer do something the examiners are looking for you to analyse the content of the text. • That means you must use P. E. E. • Identify what is stated in the article/leaflet/text that you think is particularly useful to the question. • Back this up with evidence in the form of a quotation • Analyse your quotation by explaining what effect the writer is trying to achieve and identify one word or phrase and explore the connotations that word/phrase has for the reader. Outcomes: learn and analyse the techniques used to analyse the ways in which writers try to 45 influence readers

Practice • Find 3 quotations from the hydroxatone advert that you think show off Practice • Find 3 quotations from the hydroxatone advert that you think show off the product as being appealing. • What can you say about these quotations? What do they show off about the product? • What word would you pick out of these quotations? Now explore their connotations. You now have 5 different points to make about this article that shows the examiner that you have considered all the ways in which this article advertises their product. 46

Model Paragraph • This advert appeals to the audience as it states that hdroxatone Model Paragraph • This advert appeals to the audience as it states that hdroxatone is effective. ‘scientifically advanced wrinkle reducing…. ’ this makes this product sound cutting edge and the word ‘scientific’ gives the impression that it is a researched and trustworthy product that helps make the audience feel it is going to work. 47

More Practice. . . • Now look at the extract from Simon Cowell’s autobiography More Practice. . . • Now look at the extract from Simon Cowell’s autobiography on the opposite page. • Look at the first two paragraphs of the passage. • 3. Simon Cowell admits he’s rude. What explanations does he give for his behaviour? [5] 48

The following is the opening from Simon Cowell’s autobiography, “I don’t mean to be The following is the opening from Simon Cowell’s autobiography, “I don’t mean to be rude, but…” I don’t mean to be rude, but. . . since the birth of Pop Idol and the X Factor, and their explosive success, both here and in America, people have expected nothing less of me. You see, I have become famous for being rude. At first, I was ‘the record executive’, but in no time I became ‘the nasty judge’, or ‘the brutal one’. Well, in my mind, I’m the honest one. That’s all. On X Factor, I only ever say what I am thinking at the time. That’s the only way I can describe what I’m doing. My statements are genuine. Nothing is rehearsed. When a woman walks in to audition, I might think, ‘God, she’s ugly. ’ And this, as luck would have it, is the one show on television where I can actually say to someone, “God, you’re ugly. ” To me, it’s not being rude. It’s being honest. And it’s being myself. Giving the X Factor contestants a reality check is part of the entertainment. Without it, the show wouldn’t be half as much fun, either for me or the viewers. But there’s a more serious side to my honesty. Currently, the record business is harder to break into than ever before. Labels are less willing to invest money in a new artist unless they have something really special. That’s why I prefer to tell it like it really is. We set out to make a show that honestly reflects the music business. And trust me, the record industry is not particularly nice. 49

Comparing Texts in Paper 2 L. O. TO PRACTISE USING CONNECTIVES FOR COMPARING. 50 Comparing Texts in Paper 2 L. O. TO PRACTISE USING CONNECTIVES FOR COMPARING. 50

Write a list of as many connectives as possible under each of the headings. Write a list of as many connectives as possible under each of the headings. Contrasting Connectives Similarity Connectives Paragraph Linking 51

Write a list of as many connectives as possible under each of the headings. Write a list of as many connectives as possible under each of the headings. Contrasting Connectives Similarity Connectives Paragraph Linking Unlike Both Furthermore However Similarly Firstly On the other hand As well as Next Although Like Finally Contrastingly Also Pen ultimately In contrast to Similar to Moreover But Liking to 52

write a comparative sentence about each of the images. What do each of the write a comparative sentence about each of the images. What do each of the images have in common? What is different about their content and purposes? 53

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TYPICAL QUESTIONS • Compare the ways the two texts tell you about… • Which TYPICAL QUESTIONS • Compare the ways the two texts tell you about… • Which of the 2 texts is more convincing and why? • In what ways are the 2 texts different in presenting the image/topic of…? 58

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Planning • Planning is the key to scoring top marks on this answer. • Planning • Planning is the key to scoring top marks on this answer. • It is important to remember that you must follow a P. E. E. Structure but compare both texts. • P. E. E. C. E. E. • The best way to do this is to create a planning grid. . . 61

Points to Consider Text A Text B Purpose of the text. Content of each Points to Consider Text A Text B Purpose of the text. Content of each text. Language used in each text. Overall presentation. 62

Practise Time! Read the article and Campaign leaflet on the topic of bananas. • Practise Time! Read the article and Campaign leaflet on the topic of bananas. • To answer the next question you will need to consider both texts. • A 4. Compare the newspaper article and the campaign sheet, using these headings: • the purpose of each text; • the layout/presentation of each text; • the content of each text. 63

Tip! • If you get bullet points to help guide you in a question, Tip! • If you get bullet points to help guide you in a question, USE THEM! • Divide your answer into paragraphs linked to the bullet points. This will show the examiner you are keeping the question in mind and will ensure you compare in every paragraph. 64

Do it on your own! • Read the report and the website advert about Do it on your own! • Read the report and the website advert about the moon landings • Compare and contrast what the writers say about the American moon landings. • TIP – Just because you do not have bullet points to help you doesn’t mean you should ignore comparing the content, language and presentation of texts. 65

Fill this table on your white board Points to Consider Text A Article Text Fill this table on your white board Points to Consider Text A Article Text B Website Purpose of the text. Content of each text. Language used in each text. Overall presentation. 66

Tying it up together • We have now explored all 4 skills you will Tying it up together • We have now explored all 4 skills you will need to be successful in paper 1. • We still need to time ourselves for the how questions and comparison question. • Look at the 2 articles on disciplining children. • You will have 30 mins to answer the following questions: • How does the leaflet try and persuade you that smacking is not a good way to discipline children? • Compare and Contrast both texts using the following headings: Remember – – Content you need 5 -7 explained – Language points for C-A – presentation grade. 67

Marking • You are going to assess each others’ work using a GCSE mark Marking • You are going to assess each others’ work using a GCSE mark scheme. • Give a tick with your red pen to every point that relates to the question. • Give a tick for evidence/quotations that are used only to back up points and have an explanation of what the quotation tells us about the text. • Give a double tick to explanations that are really detailed and relevant. • For the compare question, give a tick when a connective is used. 68

Grades • 5 -7 (C/B) according to • 1 (U) to those who make Grades • 5 -7 (C/B) according to • 1 (U) to those who make quality, to those who make simple comments with valid comments/inferences occasional reference to the based on appropriate detail text, or copy unselectively. from the text. • 2 -4 (E/D) marks, according • 8 -10 (A/A*) marks, to quality, to those who according to quality, to those make simple comments based who explore the text in on surface features of the detail and make valid text and/or show awareness comments/inferences. These of more obvious implicit answers should combine meanings. specific detail with overview. 69

Points to Look Out For How Question • Title – “unbeatable” suggests that smacking Points to Look Out For How Question • Title – “unbeatable” suggests that smacking is not good to children. • Sub headings – break up information, use words such as “dangers” and “smacking doesn’t work” shows they are against smacking and want to outline the negative things might make reader feel bad about themselves. • Image of a happy family – makes people think if you don’t smack then you will be happy too. • Language – harsh negative words that emphasise smacking is wrong. Emotive language that makes parents feel bad if they do smack. • • Compare Question Leaflet – Purpose of persuading against smacking • Article – Informs and explains with humour the problems with children who are not disciplined – Uses a personal story to get his point across – Uses humorous language to describe the children and their non – smacking parents 70