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England EAAL Impact Forum Adult learning and Technology 23 rd April 2015 Susan Easton England EAAL Impact Forum Adult learning and Technology 23 rd April 2015 Susan Easton Head of Digital Learning

NIACE’s work as UK coordinator • National and international webinars, learner and provider surveys NIACE’s work as UK coordinator • National and international webinars, learner and provider surveys • Identified barriers to use of technology for learners, tutors and providers • Developed resource kit for self organised learning groups.

Digital Learning and Digital Skills: Landscape § § The Programme of International Assessment of Digital Learning and Digital Skills: Landscape § § The Programme of International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC, 2013) found that an average of 14. 9% of adults across OECD countries possessed either no or basic levels of ICT competence. https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v= QO-vnw 1 z 2 k 8

Digital Skills for Life § § § In the UK, approximately 9. 5 million Digital Skills for Life § § § In the UK, approximately 9. 5 million people aged 15 and over, do not have Basic Online Skills Cannot use technology to communicate, find, retrieve and publish information, while keeping safe online - essential skills to participate in 21 st century society Less likely to manage their finances and access cheaper products and services. More likely to suffer from isolation, have lower incomes, be disenfranchised and have children who underachieve at school. More likely to be socially disadvantaged. Impacts on them, their communities and families, democracy, public services and the UK’s economic and social health. Digital Skills for Tomorrow’s World UK Digital Skills Taskforce, July 2014 "Internet use and Loneliness in Older Adults, Sum et al. , Cyber. Psychology and Behavior, Vol 11 No 2, 2008 Livingstone, S. , and Helsper, E. J. (2007): Gradations in digital inclusion: Children, young people and the digital divide. New Media & Society, 9: 671 -696. Scottish Government, Digital Participation in Scotland: Review of Evidence, 2011

Digital skills for employment • Range from generic to specialist skills for specific occupations. Digital skills for employment • Range from generic to specialist skills for specific occupations. • More advanced digital skills – can build and create • Without digital skills, less likely to find, gain and sustain employment. • By 2015, 90% of jobs in the EU will need at least basic computer skills and over half the UK workforce will require more than basic digital skills. Around half of adults lack these • 62% of employers concerned about the IT skills of the current workforce § By 2015, 90% of jobs in the EU will need at least basic computer skills Digital Skills for Tomorrow’s World UK Digital Skills Taskforce, July 2014 "Internet use and Loneliness in Older Adults, Sum et al. , Cyber. Psychology and Behavior, Vol 11 No 2, 2008 Livingstone, S. , and Helsper, E. J. (2007): Gradations in digital inclusion: Children, young people and the digital divide. New Media & Society, 9: 671 -696. Scottish Government, Digital Participation in Scotland: Review of Evidence, 2011 Across the divide. Tackling digital exclusion in Glasgow. Carnegie Trust, April 2013

Digital Skills for employment § The House of Lords calls for improvement in careers Digital Skills for employment § The House of Lords calls for improvement in careers advice and recommends connections between digital skills providers and employers to “future-proof young people” § Report identifies importance of higher level digital skills for employment, for those in work as well as those seeking employment Select Committee on Digital Skills (2015) Make or break: The UK’s Digital Future p. 44

Digital skills for learning • Many adults without basic digital skills have had little Digital skills for learning • Many adults without basic digital skills have had little formal education or achieved little educational success in earlier life. • Technology could transform their access to learning, overcoming geography, physical condition and finance and changing what, where, when and how they learn. • Technology could also present barriers. As more learning moves online, many who could benefit most from learning could be left behind. Ox. IS 2011 Report: Next Generation Users

Digital skills and community learning • Adult learning has a good track record of Digital skills and community learning • Adult learning has a good track record of delivering basic digital skills to marginalised learners • Community learning uses multiple approaches to digital inclusion, which have been effective in overcoming barriers to digital participation • What then? Progression pathways through partnership

Example: Family learning Example: Family learning

Adult learning – potential for learning technologies • Widens engagement and reach • Increases Adult learning – potential for learning technologies • Widens engagement and reach • Increases participation with large scale online learning e. g. MOOCs • Personalised learning • Increased learner autonomy • Different models of learning – self directed, flipped classroom etc • Different support models – peer support, virtual support etc • Different models of course development e. g. Open Educational Resources

NIACE’s work as UK coordinator • Webinar polls, surveys • Identified barriers to use NIACE’s work as UK coordinator • Webinar polls, surveys • Identified barriers to use of technology: access and support for staff development • Developed resource kit for self organised learning groups. • NIACE (2014) Self Organised Learning http: //www. xtlearn. net/p/sol

Communication Communication

Run a SOL group Run a SOL group

Exchanging practice https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=GJMQNiajm. Ho Exchanging practice https: //www. youtube. com/watch? v=GJMQNiajm. Ho

Questions to the Forum § Community learning providers and practitioners are keen to increase Questions to the Forum § Community learning providers and practitioners are keen to increase their use of learning technologies. However they have identified barriers including those of lack of staff capability, resource and support. What are the views of delegates and how should these issues be addressed? § Are forum members aware of any further examples of technology use by Self Organised Learning Groups? What are these and how effective is that use? How would forum members use / adapt the SOL online toolkit? § Adult learning providers have a good track record of delivering basic digital skills to marginalised learners, but lack institutional support, resources and connectivity. How could this be addressed to ensure learners progress their skills and what partnerships would help?

Produced by NIACE 2015 Shared Under Creative Commons 4. 0 BY-NC-ND Susan Easton susan. Produced by NIACE 2015 Shared Under Creative Commons 4. 0 BY-NC-ND Susan Easton susan. [email protected] org. uk @susaneaston www. niace. org. uk @niace. HQ Thank you for watching