Скачать презентацию Electrical Therapies p Automated External Defibrillators p Defibrillation Скачать презентацию Electrical Therapies p Automated External Defibrillators p Defibrillation

73482e6187e806768078e0a90eaff44e.ppt

  • Количество слайдов: 31

Electrical Therapies p. Automated External Defibrillators p. Defibrillation p. Cardioversion p. Pacing Electrical Therapies p. Automated External Defibrillators p. Defibrillation p. Cardioversion p. Pacing

Early Defibrillation (1) the most frequent initial rhythm in witnessed SCA is VF, (2) Early Defibrillation (1) the most frequent initial rhythm in witnessed SCA is VF, (2) the treatment for VF is electrical defibrillation, (3) the probability of successful defibrillation diminishes rapidly over time (4) VF tends to deteriorate to asystole within a few minutes.

Electrical Therapies Sudden Cardiac Arrest p The survival rate from CPR alone is 0 Electrical Therapies Sudden Cardiac Arrest p The survival rate from CPR alone is 0 -2% p. CPR will buy you time, it will not stop a VF

New Recommendations to Integrate CPR and AED Use Two critical questions • Whether CPR New Recommendations to Integrate CPR and AED Use Two critical questions • Whether CPR should be provided before defibrillation is attempted ? • The number of shocks to be delivered in a sequence before the rescuer resumes CPR?

Shock First Versus CPR First • Witnessed: an out-of-hospital arrest and an AED is Shock First Versus CPR First • Witnessed: an out-of-hospital arrest and an AED is immediately available on-site, the rescuer should use the AED as soon as possible • Not witnessed : EMS personnel, they may give about 5 cycles of CPR before checking the ECG rhythm and attempting defibrillation (Class IIb)

Shock First Versus CPR First • HCP witnessed cardiac arrest in hospitals and with Shock First Versus CPR First • HCP witnessed cardiac arrest in hospitals and with AEDs on-site should provide immediate CPR and should use the AED/defibrillator as soon as it is available • EMS call-to-arrival intervals were 4 to 5 minutes or longer, victims who received 1 to 3 minutes of CPR before defibrillation

1 -Shock Protocol Versus 3 Shock Sequence • In 2 studies of out-of-hospital and 1 -Shock Protocol Versus 3 Shock Sequence • In 2 studies of out-of-hospital and inhospital CPR by HCP, chest compressions were performed only 51% to 76% of total CPR time • 3 -shock sequence performed by AEDs resulted in delays of up to 37 seconds • the first-shock efficacy of >90% reported by current biphasic defibrillators

1 -Shock AED l Rescuers using monophasic AEDs should give an initial shock of 1 -Shock AED l Rescuers using monophasic AEDs should give an initial shock of 360 J; if VF persists after the first shock, second and subsequent shocks of 360 J should be given l But it is not a mandate to recall monophasic AEDs for reprogramming

Defibrillation • Defibrillation (shock success) is typically defined as termination of VF for at Defibrillation • Defibrillation (shock success) is typically defined as termination of VF for at least 5 seconds following the shock. • VF frequently recurs after successful shocks, but this recurrence should not be equated with shock failure.

Defibrillator – Monophasic Damped Sinusoidal Wave (MDS) – Monophasic truncated Exponential Wave (MTE) – Defibrillator – Monophasic Damped Sinusoidal Wave (MDS) – Monophasic truncated Exponential Wave (MTE) – Biphasic Truncated Exponential (BTE) – Rectilinear Biphasic (RBW)

Damped Sine Wave Unchanged for 30 Years • Requires high energy and current. • Damped Sine Wave Unchanged for 30 Years • Requires high energy and current. • Not highly effective for patients with high transthoracic impedance.

Biphasic Truncated Exponential The First Generation: • Adapted from low impedance ICD applications. • Biphasic Truncated Exponential The First Generation: • Adapted from low impedance ICD applications. • Impedance causes waveform to change shape.

Rectilinear Biphasic Waveform Designed Specifically for External Use: • Constant Current eliminates high peaks Rectilinear Biphasic Waveform Designed Specifically for External Use: • Constant Current eliminates high peaks • Fixed Duration stabilizes waveform in face of varying impedance levels.

Effect of Patient Impedance on Biphasic Waveforms Low Impedance High Impedance 50 40 30 Effect of Patient Impedance on Biphasic Waveforms Low Impedance High Impedance 50 40 30 30 20 20 10 10 0 0 -10 -20 First Generation Biphasic 50 40 -20 0 4 8 12 0 50 Rectilinear Biphasic -10 -20 12 0 -10 8 10 0 4 20 10 0 30 20 12 40 30 8 50 40 4 -20 0 4 8 12

Biphasic • Defibrillation with biphasic waveforms of relatively low energy ( 200 J) is Biphasic • Defibrillation with biphasic waveforms of relatively low energy ( 200 J) is safe and has equivalent or higher efficacy for termination of VF than monophasic waveform shocks of equivalent or higher energy (Class IIa). • None of the available evidence has shown superiority of either nonescalating or escalating energy

Biphasic • Current research confirms that it is reasonable to use selected energies of Biphasic • Current research confirms that it is reasonable to use selected energies of 150 J to 200 J with a biphasic truncated exponential waveform or 120 J with a rectilinear biphasic waveform for the initial shock • For second and subsequent biphasic shocks, use the same or higher energy (Class IIa).

AED • Survival rate of 41% to 74% from out-of-hospital witnessed VF SCA when AED • Survival rate of 41% to 74% from out-of-hospital witnessed VF SCA when immediate bystander CPR is provided and defibrillation occurs within about 3 to 5 minutes of collapse • Reviewers found no studies that documented the effectiveness of home AED deployment, so there is no recommendation for or against

AED • Implantable medical device • Transdermal medication patch • Lying in water • AED • Implantable medical device • Transdermal medication patch • Lying in water • Hairy chest

AED in Children • Biphasic shocks appear to be at least as effective as AED in Children • Biphasic shocks appear to be at least as effective as monophasic shocks and less harmful • Dose: 2 J/kg for the first attempt and 4 J/kg for subsequent attempts (Class Indeterminate). • If CPR to a child in cardiac arrest and does not have an AED with a pediatric attenuator system, the rescuer should use a standard AED • Not used for infants<1 y/o

In-Hospital Use of AEDs • AEDs should be considered for the hospital setting as In-Hospital Use of AEDs • AEDs should be considered for the hospital setting as a way to facilitate early defibrillation (a goal of 3 minutes from collapse)

Biphasic defibrillator • Manufacturers should display the device-specific effective waveform dose range on the Biphasic defibrillator • Manufacturers should display the device-specific effective waveform dose range on the face of the device, and providers should use that dose range when attempting defibrillation with that device

Biphasic defibrillator • BTE: 150 J to 200 J for initial shock • RBW: Biphasic defibrillator • BTE: 150 J to 200 J for initial shock • RBW: 120 J for initial shock • For second and subsequent shocks, use the same or higher energy (Class IIa). • If unaware dose range, 200 J for the first shock and an equal or higher dose for the second and subsequent shocks

Synchronized Cardioversion • shock delivery that is timed (synchronized) with the QRS complex • Synchronized Cardioversion • shock delivery that is timed (synchronized) with the QRS complex • avoid shock delivery during the relative refractory portion of the cardiac cycle, when a shock could produce VF • If impossible to synchronize a shock (eg, the patient’s rhythm is irregular), use high-energy unsynchronized shocks.

Synchronized Cardioversion • Recommended : SVT due to reentry, Af, and atrial flutter • Synchronized Cardioversion • Recommended : SVT due to reentry, Af, and atrial flutter • Not recommended: (automatic focus)MAT. Atrial Tach, Sinus Tachycardia

Synchronized Cardioversion • Af : 100 J to 200 J (Monophasic) • AF and Synchronized Cardioversion • Af : 100 J to 200 J (Monophasic) • AF and other SVT: 50 J to 100 J (Monophasic) • Cardioversion with biphasic waveforms is now available: 100 J to 120 J(Biphasic) • Monomorphic VT: 100 J, 200 J, 360 J). • Unstable polymorphic (irregular) VT with or without pulses is treated as

Pacing • Not recommended: asystolic cardiac arrest • Considered: symptomatic bradycardia • Immediate pacing Pacing • Not recommended: asystolic cardiac arrest • Considered: symptomatic bradycardia • Immediate pacing is indicated if the patient is severely symptomatic, especially when the block is at or below the His Purkinje level • If the patient does not respond to transcutaneous pacing