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Developmental Education Faculty Certification Program Lori Walker and Rick Stepp-Bolling Developmental Education Faculty Certification Program Lori Walker and Rick Stepp-Bolling

Today’s Agenda. . . * * * * * Check-in: 3 x 5 Cards/Debrief Today’s Agenda. . . * * * * * Check-in: 3 x 5 Cards/Debrief Review History/Creation of Program Introduce Program Modules Triune Brain Theory Project/Problem-based Learning Communities Integration of DE Principles Program Participants Survey Results Questions and Answers Wrap-up

In the beginning. . . A cross-disciplinary team of faculty met in the Fall In the beginning. . . A cross-disciplinary team of faculty met in the Fall of 1999 to assess the understanding, awareness, and integration of developmental education pedagogy at Mt. SAC and beyond. * Sponsored by Continuous Quality Improvement Network (CQIN) and American Productivity and Quality Center (APQC) * Nationwide study of best practices * Visited five national model programs * Studied key elements of nationally recognized successful developmental education programs

Defining our perspective. . . Developmental education is a field of practice and research Defining our perspective. . . Developmental education is a field of practice and research within higher education with a theoretical foundation in developmental psychology and learning theory. It promotes the cognitive and affective growth of all postsecondary learners, at all levels of the learning continuum. Developmental education is sensitive and responsive to the individual differences and special needs among learners. -Adopted from NADE (National Association of Developmental Educators)

Defining our Educational Philosophy. . . Remedial Perspective * Focuses on the skills that Defining our Educational Philosophy. . . Remedial Perspective * Focuses on the skills that need to be learned * Assumes that students lack certain skills, and are at one particular level * Considers only the cognitive dynamic of learning * Includes outside services designed to meet only the cognitive needs of students * Focuses on learning strategies related to the specific skills that need to be learned * Helps students master specific academic skills Developmental Perspective * Focuses on how the learner learns * Assumes students are at a variety of levels simultaneously * Considers the cognitive and affective dynamics of learning * Includes outside services designed to meet the cognitive and affective needs of students * Focuses on the development of a variety of learning strategies * Helps students master their educational/life goals and objectives

DE Faculty Certificate Program. . . * Three Module/Semester program * Six units of DE Faculty Certificate Program. . . * Three Module/Semester program * Six units of crossover credit is granted (two units per Module/Semester) * After completing all three modules, a Certificate is granted to the student * Each Module = eight classes, two hours each * Certificate of Completion = 48 hours of class time, 48 hours of “homework”

Module I: The History and Philosophical Foundations of Developmental Education First semester/module topics include: Module I: The History and Philosophical Foundations of Developmental Education First semester/module topics include: • brain-based learning/Triune Brain Theory • understanding modalities • multiple intelligences • emotional intelligence

Module Two: Integrating a Developmental Approach within the Classroom Second semester/module topics include: • Module Two: Integrating a Developmental Approach within the Classroom Second semester/module topics include: • project-based learning • problem-based learning • the development of study skills within content areas • classroom-based assessment

Module Three: Learning Communities This module has two objectives. The first one relates to Module Three: Learning Communities This module has two objectives. The first one relates to “new” knowledge: • Introduce participants to the background and opportunities for leaning community experiences on campus The second is developing knowledge acquired during the first two modules: • Assist participants in developing a personalized portfolio for one of their classes in which they can develop a comprehensive approach to the creation, development and delivery of developmental education principles within their own courses

Module IV: Integrating Developmental Ed Principles into the Classroom • As a result of Module IV: Integrating Developmental Ed Principles into the Classroom • As a result of surveying past participants, Module 4 was created • Designed to help faculty integrate what they have learned from the previous modules into their classrooms

Module I: Triune Brain Theory Module I: Triune Brain Theory

The Reptilian Brain - the The Reptilian Brain - the "Preverbal" ·It is the oldest and smallest region in the evolving human brain. ·It is "preverbal, " but controls life itself, such as autonomic brain, lung and heart functions. ·Lacking language, its impulses are instinctual and ritualistic. ·It is concerned with fundamental needs such as food, physical maintenance, preening and mating.

The Limbic Brain - the The Limbic Brain - the "Emotional" Brain ·Common to all mammals, it developed about 60 million years ago, after the dinosaurs perished. ·It's involved in bonding needs, including emotions linked to attachment. ·It acts as the brain's emotion factory, creating the chemical messages that connect information into memory. ·Retention of information can be significantly increased when it's presented in an emotionally charged context.

Understanding the Power of Emotions E-Checker and Pleasantness Checker Understanding the Power of Emotions E-Checker and Pleasantness Checker

The Neocortex Brain the The Neocortex Brain the "Thinking" Brain ·It constitutes five-sixths of the total brain mass, which has evolved over the last million years, to produce the human brain. ·It controls such high-level processes as logic, creative thought, language, and the integration of sensory information. ·The neocortex is divided into the left and right cerebral hemispheres, described in Left/Right Brain Theory.

So… . . . who cares ? So… . . . who cares ?

The Triune Brain Theory and Education Traditional education was designed for predominantly neocortex functions. The Triune Brain Theory and Education Traditional education was designed for predominantly neocortex functions. However, this misses a basic brain fact: the reptilian brain is an interconnected pathway to the limbic brain which is an interconnected pathway to the neocortex -you can’t skip a brain function! Brain-based learning experiences pay attention to the power of the whole brain by simultaneously: Responding to the learner's physical and sensory needs Creating activities that link emotions to the acquisition of new information Designing curriculum that requires students to form their own knowledge/meaning

Now it’s your turn to make meaning Now it’s your turn to make meaning

Module II: Project and Problem Based Learning Module II: Project and Problem Based Learning

Project Based Learning • Innovative model for teaching and learning • Focuses on central Project Based Learning • Innovative model for teaching and learning • Focuses on central concepts and principles of a discipline • Involves students in problem-solving investigations • Allows students to work autonomously to construct their own knowledge • Culminates in realistic products

Example: Orientation Team Project Study Techniques • Your team will be creating an Orientation Example: Orientation Team Project Study Techniques • Your team will be creating an Orientation Handbook for students at Mt. SAC. In this handbook you will identify and describe three areas vital to a certain student population here at Mt. San Antonio College. In order to complete this handbook, you will first need to do these things:

Orientation Project, Continued • 1. Choose a student population (Re-entry, ESL, honor, athletes, etc). Orientation Project, Continued • 1. Choose a student population (Re-entry, ESL, honor, athletes, etc). These students must have been attending Mt. SAC for at least one semester • 2. Create a survey. You will need to know what three areas on campus are most vital for your student population • 3. Survey the students. You will need to find and survey students (minimum 20) from your selected population

Orientation Project, Continued • 4. Compile and graph your results • 5. Research the Orientation Project, Continued • 4. Compile and graph your results • 5. Research the top three areas (use catalog, website, personal interview, etc) • 6. Write your handbook as though you were writing to new students from your student population • 7. Present your findings to the class

Problem-Based Learning • It is both a curriculum and a process • Curriculum: built Problem-Based Learning • It is both a curriculum and a process • Curriculum: built around an ill-structured problem which is messy and complex in nature • Process: challenges students to learn cooperatively in groups to seek solutions to real world problems

Example: Problem-Based Learning History • You have been asked to help colonize the planet Example: Problem-Based Learning History • You have been asked to help colonize the planet Mars. What problems do you foresee in this task? What are some viable solutions?

Comparison with other Teaching Strategies • Prescriptive Curriculum – – Teacher-centered Linear and rational Comparison with other Teaching Strategies • Prescriptive Curriculum – – Teacher-centered Linear and rational Part to whole Teaching as transmitting – Learning as receiving – Structured environment • Experiential Curriculum – – Student-centered Coherent and relevant Whole to part Teaching as facilitating – Learning as constructing – Flexible environment

Animals Exercise • Are you a: 1. 2. 3. 4. Hawk Tiger Turtle Rabbit Animals Exercise • Are you a: 1. 2. 3. 4. Hawk Tiger Turtle Rabbit

Questions: • 1. Why did you select this particular animal? • 2. What qualities Questions: • 1. Why did you select this particular animal? • 2. What qualities do you have in common with this animal? • 3. How do you (and this animal) react in times of stress? • 4. How do you want others to treat you in times of stress?

Module III: Learning Communities Module III: Learning Communities

Module IV: Integrating Developmental Ed Philosophy into the Classroom Module IV: Integrating Developmental Ed Philosophy into the Classroom

Developmental Education in Practice Elements of DE Practice to Keep in Mind: 1. Create Developmental Education in Practice Elements of DE Practice to Keep in Mind: 1. Create an emotional environment that is comfortable and Ø Ø Incorporate check-ins or other ice breakers Create a physical environment that promotes student interaction and engagement 2. Consider students’ learning styles Ø Ø inviting Visual/verbal Visual/nonverbal Auditory Kinesthetic

Developmental Education in Practice • 3. Consider students’ multiple intelligences Ø Ø Ø Ø Developmental Education in Practice • 3. Consider students’ multiple intelligences Ø Ø Ø Ø Visual/Spatial Verbal/Linguistic Logical-Mathematical Bodily Kinesthetic Musical Interpersonal Naturalist Existentialist 4. Use an Active Learning approach that allows students to create their own knowledge Ø Ø Investigate various methods of using active learning in your discipline Use textbooks that support active learning in the classroom Problem-based learning Project-based learning

Developmental Education in Practice • 5. Incorporate structural knowledge/study techniques to help support student Developmental Education in Practice • 5. Incorporate structural knowledge/study techniques to help support student success Ø Ø Ø Ø Goal setting Time Management Note taking Personal Responsibility Stress Management Textbook Reading Test taking/ Test anxiety

Developmental Education in Practice • 6. Use assessment as a tool to see what Developmental Education in Practice • 6. Use assessment as a tool to see what is and is not working Ø Ø Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs) Portfolios Matrices/Rubrics Reflections 7. Create a Learning Community Ø Ø Paired or clustered classes Coordinated Studies Freshman Interest Groups (Bridge or Freshman Experience) Federated Learning Community

Program Participant Survey Results Program Participant Survey Results

Survey Findings • 100% of survey respondents noticed positive changes in their student’s success Survey Findings • 100% of survey respondents noticed positive changes in their student’s success • 95% of faculty surveyed noticed “some change” or “complete change” in their teaching strategies; the same percentage also noted either some or complete change in the affective environment of the classroom • 81% noted some or complete change in modifying their assignments; the same proportion noted modifying their assessment of assignments • Over 90% reported some change or complete change in their level of involvement in their courses • 71% noted some or complete change in their use of Learning Communities; the same proportion was found for use of Student Learning Outcomes

Where is Rick? • Mt San Antonio College • 909 594 -5611 ext 4303 Where is Rick? • Mt San Antonio College • 909 594 -5611 ext 4303 • Email: [email protected] edu

Questions? Questions?