Скачать презентацию CS 37 Computer Architecture Spring Term 2004 Instructor Скачать презентацию CS 37 Computer Architecture Spring Term 2004 Instructor

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CS 37: Computer Architecture Spring Term, 2004 Instructor: Kate Forbes Riley forbesk@cs. dartmouth. edu CS 37: Computer Architecture Spring Term, 2004 Instructor: Kate Forbes Riley [email protected] dartmouth. edu Teaching Assistant: 1

CS 37: Lecture 1 • Administrivia • Overview of CS 37: Inside the Computer CS 37: Lecture 1 • Administrivia • Overview of CS 37: Inside the Computer • Introduction to Binary Numbers 2

Schedule • Lectures: Sudikoff 115, MWF, 11: 15 am – 12: 20 pm • Schedule • Lectures: Sudikoff 115, MWF, 11: 15 am – 12: 20 pm • Office Hours – Kate: • MWF, 12: 20 pm – 4: 00 pm (email for appointments) • [email protected] dartmouth. edu • Xxx sudikoff – TA: 3

Resources • CS 37, 2004 S WEBPAGE: http: //www. cs. dartmouth. edu/~cs 37/ • Resources • CS 37, 2004 S WEBPAGE: http: //www. cs. dartmouth. edu/~cs 37/ • My lecture slides • Required Textbooks: – PH: Patterson and Hennessey, 2 nd Edition: Computer Organization and Design. Wheelock Books – X 86: X 86 assembly language page, Dr. Paul Carter’s book. • Computer Labs: Linux workstations in Sudikoff 001 and 005 – Access Policy: no meals in the lab – Access Card (1 -2 days to activate): • Sudikoff office: M-F 8: 30 am – 12: 00 pm and 1: 00 pm - 4: 00 pm • Dartmouth ID and a $20 cash deposit (refunded) • Recommended Reading: – Introduction to UNIX, by Chris Mc. Donald. Online (PS and PDF) 4

Grading • Homework: 50% – Reading assignments in textbook – 6 written assignments (available Grading • Homework: 50% – Reading assignments in textbook – 6 written assignments (available in class and online) – Due on due date at start of class. Late assignments accepted up to start of next class with 30% penalty. – 1 free late assignment (if handed in at start of next class). – Special arrangements for emergency (documented illness) – For non-emergencies, hand in early • Midterm Exam: 25% – Take-home exam covering 1 st half of course material • Final Exam: 25% – In-class exam focusing heavily on 2 nd half of course material 5

HONOR CODE • The Dartmouth Honor Code applies to your conduct in this course. HONOR CODE • The Dartmouth Honor Code applies to your conduct in this course. If you have questions about the Code, talk to me: – HOMEWORK: • All written work submitted must be your own • Do not read or copy another student’s submissions • Do not look at solutions from prior terms • Do discuss lectures, example problems, assignment problems, debug code, etc, with classmates, Kate, TA – EXAMS: • Do not give or receive assistance from anyone other than Kate, TAs • Violations of the Honor Code will be treated seriously. 6

Disabilities • ANY STUDENT WITH A DOCUMENTED DISABILITY NEEDING ACADEMIC ADJUSTMENTS OR ACCOMMODATIONS IS Disabilities • ANY STUDENT WITH A DOCUMENTED DISABILITY NEEDING ACADEMIC ADJUSTMENTS OR ACCOMMODATIONS IS REQUESTED TO SPEAK WITH ME BY THE END OF THE 2 nd WEEK OF THE TERM • ALL DISCUSSIONS WILL BE CONFIDENTIAL • STOP BY THE ACADEMIC SKILLS CENTER iin 301 COLLIS CENTER TO REGISTER FOR SUPPORT SERVICES 7

You and Me in 60 seconds • Me: born, B. A. @ Dartmouth, M. You and Me in 60 seconds • Me: born, B. A. @ Dartmouth, M. S. E. and Ph. D. @ UPenn, my specialty = computational linguistics (I basically work with logics and languages) • You: Name? Home? Major? Career plans? 8

Overview of CS 37: Introduction • Things you’ll be learning: – how computers work, Overview of CS 37: Introduction • Things you’ll be learning: – how computers work, a basic foundation – how to analyze their performance (or how not to!) – issues affecting modern processors (caches, pipelines) • Why learn this stuff? – you want to call yourself a “computer scientist” – you want to build software people use (need performance) – you need to make a purchasing decision or offer “expert” advice 9

Introduction • Rapidly changing field: – vacuum tube -> transistor -> IC -> VLSI Introduction • Rapidly changing field: – vacuum tube -> transistor -> IC -> VLSI (see section 1. 4) – doubling every 1. 5 years: memory capacity processor speed (Due to advances in technology and organization) 10

What is a computer? • Components: – – input (mouse, keyboard) output (display, printer) What is a computer? • Components: – – input (mouse, keyboard) output (display, printer) memory (disk drives, DRAM, SRAM, CD) network • Our primary focus: the processor (datapath and control) – implemented using millions of transistors – Impossible to understand by looking at each transistor – We need. . . 11

Abstraction • Delving into the depths reveals more information • An abstraction omits unneeded Abstraction • Delving into the depths reveals more information • An abstraction omits unneeded detail, helps us cope with complexity What are some of the details that appear in these familiar abstractions? 12

Instruction Set Architecture • A very important abstraction – interface between hardware and low-level Instruction Set Architecture • A very important abstraction – interface between hardware and low-level software – standardizes instructions, machine language bit patterns, etc. – advantage: different implementations of the same architecture – disadvantage: sometimes prevents using new innovations True or False: Binary compatibility is extraordinarily important? • Modern instruction set architectures: – 80 x 86/Pentium/K 6, Power. PC, DEC Alpha, MIPS, SPARC, HP 13

Where we are headed • Performance issues (Chapter 2) vocabulary and motivation • A Where we are headed • Performance issues (Chapter 2) vocabulary and motivation • A specific instruction set architecture (Chapter 3) • Arithmetic and how to build an ALU (Chapter 4) • Constructing a processor to execute our instructions (Chapter 5) • Pipelining to improve performance (Chapter 6) • Memory: caches and virtual memory (Chapter 7) • I/O (Chapter 8) Key to a good grade: reading the book! 14

Assignment • Reading: skim PH Sections 1. 1 – 1. 8 15 Assignment • Reading: skim PH Sections 1. 1 – 1. 8 15