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Chapter 8: Globalization, Inequality, and Development Melanie Hatfield Soc 100 Chapter 8: Globalization, Inequality, and Development Melanie Hatfield Soc 100

The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n n International communication has become easy and The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n n International communication has become easy and inexpensive. In 1930, a 3 -minute New York to London phone call cost more than $250 in today’s dollars and only a minority of Americans had telephones in their homes. In 2009, the same call cost as little as 15 cents and telephones, including cell phones, seem to be everywhere. Between 1982 and 2006, when the world’s population increased by 41%, the number of international tourists increased by 205%.

The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n n International trade and investment have increased The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n n International trade and investment have increased rapidly. From 1982 to 2006, worldwide investment across national borders increased by 2, 114%. Many more international organizations and agreements now span the globe. In 1981, about 14, 000 international organizations existed. By 2006, there were three-and-ahalf times as many. Individual nation-states give up some of their independence wen they join international organizations or sign international agreements.

The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n The Internet did not exist in 1982, The Triumphs and Tragedies of Globalization n The Internet did not exist in 1982, but in 2006 it comprised 439 million servers connecting people from around the world through e-mail, file transfers, websites, and videoconferencing.

Foreign Visitors to Top Ten Visited Countries Foreign Visitors to Top Ten Visited Countries

Many people oppose globalization because… n n Inequality between rich and poor countries remains Many people oppose globalization because… n n Inequality between rich and poor countries remains and is also increasing. It may be hurting local cultures and the natural environment. Some suggest that globalization is a form of imperialism, which is the economic domination of one country by another. It contributes to the “homogenization” of the world, the cultural domination of less powerful by more powerful countries.

Sources of Globalization: Technology n n n Technological progress has made it possible to Sources of Globalization: Technology n n n Technological progress has made it possible to move objects and information over long distances quickly and inexpensively. The introduction of commercial jets radically shortened the time necessary for international travel, and the cost of such travel dropped dramatically after the 1950 s. Similarly, various means of communication, such as telephone, fax, and e-mail, allow us to reach people around the globe inexpensively and almost instantly.

Sources of Globalization: Politics n n Politics are important in bringing people from far Sources of Globalization: Politics n n Politics are important in bringing people from far away together in both micro and macro ways. Case in point: North Korea and South Korea n n n Both countries are the same distance away from the US, yet we have many ties with South Korea and no ties to North Korea. The South Korean government has been a close ally of the US since the Korean War in the early 1950 s and has sought greater political, economic, and cultural integration with the outside world. North Korea, in an effort to preserve its authoritarian political system and socialist economic system, has remained isolated from the rest of the world.

Sources of Globalization: Economics n n 1. 2. Transnational corporations are the most important Sources of Globalization: Economics n n 1. 2. Transnational corporations are the most important agents of globalization in the world today. They are different from traditional corporations in 5 ways: Traditional corporations rely on domestic labor and domestic production. Transnational corporations depend increasingly on foreign labor and foreign production. Traditional corporations extract natural resources or manufacture industrial goods. Transnational corporations increasingly emphasize skills and advances in design, technology, and management.

Transnational Corporations Differences (Cont. ) 3. 4. 5. Traditional corporations sell to domestic markets. Transnational Corporations Differences (Cont. ) 3. 4. 5. Traditional corporations sell to domestic markets. Transnational corporations depend increasingly on world markets. Traditional corporations rely on established marketing and sales outlets. Transnational corporations depend increasingly on massive advertising campaigns. Traditional corporations work with or under national governments. Transnational corporations are increasingly autonomous from national governments.

Globalization Causing Homogenization n n Globalization is homogenizing the world. Many economic and financial Globalization Causing Homogenization n n Globalization is homogenizing the world. Many economic and financial institutions around the world now operate in roughly the same way – much like the US. Mc. Donaldization: “the process by which the principles of the fast-food restaurant are coming to dominate more sectors of American society as well as the rest of the world. ” Because of Mc. Donalization, the values of efficiency, calculability, and predictability have spread from the US to the entire planet and from fast-food restaurants to virtually all spheres of life.

Levels of Global Inequality n n n The richest 1% of the world’s population Levels of Global Inequality n n n The richest 1% of the world’s population earns as much income as the bottom 57%. The top 10% of US income earners earn as much as the poorest 2 billion people in the world. Of the world’s 6. 5 billion people, around 1 billion live on less than $1 a day and 2. 6 billion live on less than $2 a day. The citizens of 20 rich, highly industrialized countries spend more on cosmetics or alcohol or ice cream or pet food than it would take to provide basic education, or water and sanitation, or basic health and nutrition for everyone in the world. Just 10% of the world trade in narcotics or 5% of world military spending could supply these necessities to the world’s desperately poor.

Gross Domestic Product per Capita, World Regions Gross Domestic Product per Capita, World Regions

Modernist Theory: A Functionalist Approach Modernist theory beliefs: n Global inequality results form various Modernist Theory: A Functionalist Approach Modernist theory beliefs: n Global inequality results form various dysfunctional characteristics of poor societies. n They lack a Western mentality: values that stress the need for savings, investment, innovation, education, high achievement, and self-control in having children. n People living in rich countries can best help poor countries by transferring Western culture and capital to them and eliminating the dysfunctions. n Only then will the poor countries be able to cap population growth, stimulate democracy, and invigorate agricultural and industrial production.

Dependency Theory: A Conflict Approach Dependency theory beliefs: n For the past 500 years, Dependency Theory: A Conflict Approach Dependency theory beliefs: n For the past 500 years, the most powerful countries in the world deliberately impoverished the less powerful countries. n An adequate theory of global inequality should not focus on the internal characteristics of poor countries themselves. n Instead it ought to follow the core principles of conflict theory and focus on patterns of domination and submission.

Dependency Theory: A Conflict Approach (Cont. ) n n n Beginning around 1500, the Dependency Theory: A Conflict Approach (Cont. ) n n n Beginning around 1500, the armed forces of the world’s most powerful countries subdued and then annexed or colonized most of the rest of the world. Around 1780, the Industrial Revolution began. It enabled the Western European countries, Russia, Japan, and the US to collect enormous wealth, which they used to extend their global reach. They forced their colonies to become a source of raw materials, cheap labor, investment opportunities, and markets for conquering nations. Exploitation by direct political control was soon replaced by new means of achieving the same end: substantial foreign investment, support for authoritarian governments, and mounting debt.

Do foreign investment and liberalized trade policies have positive or negative effects today? n Do foreign investment and liberalized trade policies have positive or negative effects today? n Modernization theorists want more foreign investment in poor countries and freer trade. n n n They strongly believe that following these policies will promote economic growth and general well-being. They want trade and investment barriers to be dropped so free markets can bring prosperity to everyone. Dependency theorists dramatically oppose this strategy. n n They think foreign investment drains the wealth out of poor countries. Therefore, they want the poor countries to rebel against the rich countries, throw up barriers to free trade and investment, and find their own path to well-being.

Core, Periphery, and Semiperiphery n Immanuel Wallerstein argues that capitalist development resulted in a Core, Periphery, and Semiperiphery n Immanuel Wallerstein argues that capitalist development resulted in a world system composed of three tiers: core capitalist countries - major sources of capital and technology n peripheral countries - major sources of raw materials and cheap labor n semiperipheral countries - former colonies that are becoming prosperous n

n The semiperipheral countries differ from the peripheral countries in 4 main ways: Type n The semiperipheral countries differ from the peripheral countries in 4 main ways: Type of colonialism n Geopolitical position n State policy n Social structure n

Neoliberal Globalization Neoliberal globalization is a policy that promotes private control of industry and Neoliberal Globalization Neoliberal globalization is a policy that promotes private control of industry and minimal government interference in the running of the economy. n Advocates of neo liberal globalization also support foreign investment and the removal of taxes, tariffs, and restrictive regulations that discourage the international buying and selling of goods and services. n

n Four types of actions of globalization reform: Foreign aid n Debt cancellation n n Four types of actions of globalization reform: Foreign aid n Debt cancellation n Tariff reduction n Democratic globalization. n

Foreign Aid n n Foreign aid is often accompanied by high administrative and overhead Foreign Aid n n Foreign aid is often accompanied by high administrative and overhead costs. It is often given on condition that it be used to buy from donor countries goods that are not necessarily high-priority items for recipient countries. Foreign aid can be beneficial with oversight to ensure that foreign aid is not wasted and is directed to truly helpful projects. Increasing the amount of foreign aid and redesigning its delivery can help mitigate some of the excesses of neoliberal globalization.

Debt Cancellation n n Many analysts argue that the world’s rich countries and banks Debt Cancellation n n Many analysts argue that the world’s rich countries and banks should write off the debt owed to them by developing countries in recognition of historical injustices. They reason that the debt burden of the developing countries is so burdensome that it prevents them from focusing on building economic infrastructure, improving health an education of their populations, and developing economic policies that can help them emerge from poverty.

Tariff Reduction n The reduction of tariffs by rich countries because these tariffs prevent Tariff Reduction n The reduction of tariffs by rich countries because these tariffs prevent developing countries from exporting goods that could earn them money for investment in agriculture, industry, and infrastructure.

Democratic Globalization n n Research shows that democracy lowers inequality and promotes economic growth. Democratic Globalization n n Research shows that democracy lowers inequality and promotes economic growth. Democracies make it more difficult for elite groups to misuse their power and enhance their wealth and income at the expense of the less well to do. They increase political stability, so to provide a better investment climate. They tend to enact policies that are more responsive to people’s needs and benefit a wide range of people from all social classes.