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Chapter 1: Introduction to Business Intelligence Chapter 1: Introduction to Business Intelligence

Learning Objectives n n Understand today's turbulent business environment and describe how organizations survive Learning Objectives n n Understand today's turbulent business environment and describe how organizations survive and even excel in such an environment (solving problems and exploiting opportunities) Understand the need for computerized support of managerial decision making Describe the business intelligence (BI) methodology and concepts and relate them to decision support systems (DSS) Understand the issues in implementing BI

Opening Vignette… “Norfolk Southern Uses BI for Decision Support to Reach Success” n Company Opening Vignette… “Norfolk Southern Uses BI for Decision Support to Reach Success” n Company background n Problem n Proposed solution n Results n Answer & discuss the case questions.

Changing Business Environment & Computerized Decision Support n n Companies are moving aggressively to Changing Business Environment & Computerized Decision Support n n Companies are moving aggressively to computerized support of their operations => Business Intelligence Business Pressures–Responses–Support Model n n n Business pressures result of today's competitive business climate Responses to counter the pressures Support to better facilitate the process

Business Pressures–Responses– Support Model Business Pressures–Responses– Support Model

The Business Environment n The environment in which organizations operate today is becoming more The Business Environment n The environment in which organizations operate today is becoming more and more complex, creating: n n opportunities, and problems. Example: globalization. Business environment factors: n markets, consumer demands, technology, and societal.

Business Environment Factors FACTOR Markets Consumer demand Technology Societal DESCRIPTION Strong competition Expanding global Business Environment Factors FACTOR Markets Consumer demand Technology Societal DESCRIPTION Strong competition Expanding global markets Blooming electronic markets on the Internet Innovative marketing methods Opportunities for outsourcing with IT support Need for real-time, on-demand transactions Desire for customization Desire for quality, diversity of products, and speed of delivery Customers getting powerful and less loyal More innovations, new products, and new services Increasing obsolescence rate Increasing information overload Social networking, Web 2. 0 and beyond Growing government regulations and deregulation Workforce more diversified, older, and composed of more women Prime concerns of homeland security and terrorist attacks Necessity of Sarbanes-Oxley Act and other reporting-related legislation Increasing social responsibility of companies Greater emphasis on sustainability

Organizational Responses n n Be Reactive, Anticipative, Adaptive, and Proactive Managers may take actions, Organizational Responses n n Be Reactive, Anticipative, Adaptive, and Proactive Managers may take actions, such as: n n n n Employing strategic planning. Using new and innovative business models. Restructuring business processes. Participating in business alliances. Improving corporate information systems. Improving partnership relationships. Encouraging innovation and creativity. …cont…>

Organizational Responses, continued n n n n Improving customer service and relationships. Moving to Organizational Responses, continued n n n n Improving customer service and relationships. Moving to electronic commerce (e-commerce). Moving to make-to-order production and ondemand manufacturing and services. Using new IT to improve communication, data access (discovery of information), and collaboration. Responding quickly to competitors' actions (e. g. , in pricing, promotions, new products and services). Automating many tasks of white-collar employees. Automating certain decision processes. Improving decision making by employing analytics.

Closing the Strategy Gap n One of the major objectives of computerized decision support Closing the Strategy Gap n One of the major objectives of computerized decision support is to facilitate closing the gap between the current performance of an organization and its desired performance, as expressed in its mission, objectives, and goals, and the strategy to achieve them.

Business Intelligence (BI) n BI is an evolution of decision support concepts over time. Business Intelligence (BI) n BI is an evolution of decision support concepts over time. n Meaning of EIS/DSS… n n Then: Executive Information System Now: Everybody’s Information System (BI) BI systems are enhanced with additional visualizations, alerts, and performance measurement capabilities. The term BI emerged from industry apps.

Definition of BI n n BI is an umbrella term that combines architectures, tools, Definition of BI n n BI is an umbrella term that combines architectures, tools, databases, analytical tools, applications, and methodologies. BI a content-free expression, so it means different things to different people. BI's major objective is to enable easy access to data (and models) to provide business managers with the ability to conduct analysis. BI helps transform data, to information (and knowledge), to decisions and finally to action.

A Brief History of BI n n The term BI was coined by the A Brief History of BI n n The term BI was coined by the Gartner Group in the mid-1990 s However, the concept is much older n n n 1970 s — MIS reporting — static/periodic reports 1980 s — Executive Information Systems (EIS) 1990 s — OLAP, dynamic, multidimensional, ad-hoc reporting -> coining of the term “BI” 2005+ — Inclusion of AI and Data/Text Mining capabilities; Web-based Portals/Dashboards 2010 s — Yet to be seen

The Evolution of BI Capabilities The Evolution of BI Capabilities

The Architecture of BI n A BI system has four major components: n n The Architecture of BI n A BI system has four major components: n n a data warehouse, with its source data business analytics, a collection of tools for manipulating, mining, and analyzing the data in the data warehouse; business performance management (BPM) for monitoring and analyzing performance a user interface (e. g. , dashboard)

A High-level Architecture of BI A High-level Architecture of BI

Components in a BI Architecture n The data warehouse is the cornerstone of any Components in a BI Architecture n The data warehouse is the cornerstone of any medium-to-large BI system. n n n Originally, the data warehouse included only historical data that was organized and summarized, so end users could easily view or manipulate it. Today, some data warehouses include access to current data as well, so they can provide real-time decision support (for details see Chapter 2). Business analytics are the tools that help users transform data into knowledge (e. g. , queries, data/text mining tools, etc. ).

BI Examples n n n Epagogix is an analytics based BI system that specializes BI Examples n n n Epagogix is an analytics based BI system that specializes in predicting success of movies based on a detailed analysis of movie scripts. National Australia Bank uses data mining to aid its marketing initiatives. Hoyt Highland Partners, a marketing intelligence firm, assists health care providers with growing their businesses.

Components in a BI Architecture n n Business Performance Management (BPM), which is also Components in a BI Architecture n n Business Performance Management (BPM), which is also referred to as corporate performance management (CPM), is an emerging portfolio of applications within the BI framework that provides enterprises tools they need to better manage their operations (for details see Chapter 3). User Interface (i. e. , dashboards) provides a comprehensive graphical/pictorial view of corporate performance measures, trends, and exceptions.

Styles of BI n Micro. Strategy, Corp. distinguishes five styles of BI and offers Styles of BI n Micro. Strategy, Corp. distinguishes five styles of BI and offers tools for each: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. report delivery and alerting enterprise reporting (using dashboards and scorecards) cube analysis (also known as slice-anddice analysis) ad-hoc queries statistics and data mining

The Benefits of BI n n The ability to provide accurate information when needed, The Benefits of BI n n The ability to provide accurate information when needed, including a real-time view of the corporate performance and its parts A survey by Thompson (2004) n n n Faster, more accurate reporting (81%) Improved decision making (78%) Improved customer service (56%) Increased revenue (49%) See Table 1. 2 for a list of BI analytic applications, the business questions they answer and the business value they bring.

Automated Decision Making n n A relatively new approach to supporting decision making Applies Automated Decision Making n n A relatively new approach to supporting decision making Applies to highly structured decisions Automated decision systems (ADS) (or decision automation systems) An ADS is a rule-based system that provides a solution to a repetitive managerial problem in a specific area. n e. g. , simple-loan approval system

Automated Decision-Making Framework Automated Decision-Making Framework

Automated Decision Making n ADS initially appeared in the airline industry called revenue (or Automated Decision Making n ADS initially appeared in the airline industry called revenue (or yield) management (or revenue optimization) systems. n n n dynamically price tickets based on actual demand Today, many service industries use similar pricing models. ADS are driven by business rules!

Intelligence Creation and Use A Cyclical Process of Intelligence Creation And Use ü BI Intelligence Creation and Use A Cyclical Process of Intelligence Creation And Use ü BI practitioners often follow the national security model depicted in this figure.

Intelligence Creation and Use n Steps Involved n n Data warehouse deployment Creation of Intelligence Creation and Use n Steps Involved n n Data warehouse deployment Creation of intelligence n Identification and prioritization of BI projects n n n By using ROI and TCO (cost-benefit analysis) This process is also called BI governance BI Governance n Who should do the prioritization? n n Partnership between functional area heads Partnership between customers and providers

BI Governance Issues/Tasks 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Create categories of projects (investment, business BI Governance Issues/Tasks 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Create categories of projects (investment, business opportunity, strategic, mandatory, etc. ) Define criteria for project selection Determine and set a framework for managing project risk Manage and leverage project interdependencies Continuously monitor and adjust the composition of the portfolio

Intelligence and Espionage n Stealing corporate secrets, CIA, … n n Intelligence vs. Espionage Intelligence and Espionage n Stealing corporate secrets, CIA, … n n Intelligence vs. Espionage Intelligence The way that modern companies ethically and legally organize themselves to glean as much as they can from their customers, their business environment, their stakeholders, their business processes, their competitors, and other such sources of potentially valuable information n Problem – too much data, very little value n Use of data/text/Web mining (see Chapter 4, 5)

Transaction Processing Versus Analytic Processing n Transaction processing systems are constantly involved in handling Transaction Processing Versus Analytic Processing n Transaction processing systems are constantly involved in handling updates (add/edit/delete) to what we might call operational databases. n n ATM withdrawal transaction, sales order entry via an ecommerce site – updates DBs Online analytic processing (OLTP) handles routine on-going business ERP, SCM, CRM systems generate and store data in OLTP systems The main goal is to have high efficiency

Transaction Processing Versus Analytic Processing n Online analytic processing (OLAP) systems are involved in Transaction Processing Versus Analytic Processing n Online analytic processing (OLAP) systems are involved in extracting information from data stored by OLTP systems n n Routine sales reports by product, by region, by sales person, etc. Often built on top of a data warehouse where the data is not transactional Main goal is effectiveness (and then, efficiency) – provide correct information in a timely manner More on OLAP will be covered in Chapter 2

Successful BI Implementation n Implementing and deploying a BI initiative is a lengthy, expensive Successful BI Implementation n Implementing and deploying a BI initiative is a lengthy, expensive and risky endeavor! Success of a BI system is measured by its widespread usage for better decision making. The typical BI user community includes n All levels of the management hierarchy (not just the top executives, as was for EIS) n n Provide what is needed to whom he/she needs it A successful BI system must be of benefit to the enterprise as a whole.

BI and Business Strategy n To be successful, BI must be aligned with the BI and Business Strategy n To be successful, BI must be aligned with the company’s business strategy. n n BI changes the way a company conducts business by n n n BI cannot/should not be a technical exercise for the information systems department. improving business processes, and transforming decision making to a more data/fact/information driven activity. BI should help execute the business strategy and not be an impediment for it!

BI for Business Strategy n Strategy should be aligned with BI/DW – has the BI for Business Strategy n Strategy should be aligned with BI/DW – has the capability to execute the initiative by establishing a BI Competency Center (BICC) which can: n n Demonstrate linkage – BI to strategy. Encourage interaction between the potential business users and the IS organization. n n Both sides have a lot to learn from each other Serve as a repository and disseminator of best BI practices among the different lines of business. Advocate and encourage standards of excellence. Help stakeholders understand the crucial role of BI.

Real-time, On-demand BI n n n The demand for “real-time” BI is growing! Is Real-time, On-demand BI n n n The demand for “real-time” BI is growing! Is “real-time” BI attainable? Technology is getting there… n n n Automated, faster data collection (RFID, sensors, … ) Database and other software technologies (agent, SOA, …) are advancing Telecommunication infrastructure is improving Computational power is increasing while the cost for these technologies is decreasing Trent -> Business Activity Management

Issues for Successful BI n Developing vs. Acquiring BI systems n n n Developing Issues for Successful BI n Developing vs. Acquiring BI systems n n n Developing everything from scratch Buying/leasing a complete system Using a shell BI system and customizing it Use of outside consultants? Justifying via cost-benefit analysis n n It is easier to quantify costs Harder to quantify benefits n Most of them are intangibles

Issues for Successful BI n Security and Privacy n n n Still an important Issues for Successful BI n Security and Privacy n n n Still an important research topic in BI How much security/privacy? Integration of Systems and Applications n BI must integrate into the existing IS n n Often sits on top of ERP, SCM, CRM systems Integration to outside (partners of the extended enterprise) via internet – n customers, vendors, government agencies, etc.

Major BI Tools and Techniques n Tool categories n n n n Data management Major BI Tools and Techniques n Tool categories n n n n Data management Reporting, status tracking Visualization Strategy and performance management Business analytics Social networking & Web 2. 0 New/advanced tools/techniques to handle massive data sets for knowledge discovery

Major BI Vendors n In recent years, the landscape of BI vendors has changed Major BI Vendors n In recent years, the landscape of BI vendors has changed n Cognos acquired by IBM in 2008 n n Hyperion acquired by Oracle in 2008 Business Objects acquired by SAP in 2009 Microstrategy n n IBM also acquired SPSS in 2009 May be the only independent large BI vendor Others include Microsoft, SAS, Teradata (mostly considered a DW vendor)

BI Resources n Teradata University Network n n n n A great and free BI Resources n Teradata University Network n n n n A great and free academic resource for BI (the available resources include cases, articles, tools including Microstrategy, datasets, exercises, etc. The Data Warehousing Institute (tdwi. org) The OLAP Report (olapreport. com) DSS Resources (dssresources. com) Business Intelligence Network (b-eye-network. com) AIS World (isworld. org) Microsoft Enterprise Consortium (enterprise. waltoncollege. uark. edu/mec)

End of the Chapter n Questions / Comments… End of the Chapter n Questions / Comments…