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Ch. 2 – 802. 11 and NICs Part 3 – 802. 11 PHY Cisco Ch. 2 – 802. 11 and NICs Part 3 – 802. 11 PHY Cisco Fundamentals of Wireless LANs version 1. 1 Rick Graziani Cabrillo College Spring 2005 Note: Includes information which is in Cisco online curriculum Module 2 and Module 3

Topics • • • Overview of Waves EM Spectrum 802. 11 PHY Physical Layer Topics • • • Overview of Waves EM Spectrum 802. 11 PHY Physical Layer Technologies – PLCP – PMD 802. 11 Technologies – FHSS – 802. 11 – DSSS- 802. 11 – HR/DSSS – 802. 11 b – OFDM – 802. 11 a – ERP – 802. 11 g Comparing 802. 11 a, 802. 11 b, 802. 11 g Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 2

Overview of Waves Overview of Waves

Overview of Waves • • Wave is a “disturbance or variation” that travels through Overview of Waves • • Wave is a “disturbance or variation” that travels through a medium. The medium through which the wave travels may experience some local oscillations as the wave passes, but the particles in the medium do not travel with the wave. – Just like none of the individual people in the stadium are carried around when they do the wave, they all remain at their seats. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 4

Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • • Waves are one way in which Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • • Waves are one way in which energy can move from one place to another. The waves that you see at the beach are the result of the kinetic energy of water particles passing through the water. Other types of energy (such as light, heat, and radio waves) can travel in this way as well. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 5

Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • • The distance between 2 peaks (or Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • • The distance between 2 peaks (or 2 troughs) is called a wavelength The deepest part of a trough or the highest part of a peak is called the amplitude The frequency is the number of wavelengths that pass by in 1 second Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 6

Longitudinal Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • Longitudinal sound waves in the air Longitudinal Waves www. ewart. org. uk • • Longitudinal sound waves in the air behave in much the same way. As the sound wave passes through, the particles in the air oscillate back and forth from their equilibrium positions but it is the disturbance that travels, not the individual particles in the medium. Rick talks in a loud voice. When he talks he causes the air near his mouth to compress. A compression wave then passes through the air to the ears of the people around him. A longitudinal sound wave has to travel through something - it cannot pass through a vacuum because there aren't any particles to compress together. It has a wavelength; a frequency and an amplitude. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 7

Transverse Waves • • • interactive activity 3. 1. 1 Transverse waves on a Transverse Waves • • • interactive activity 3. 1. 1 Transverse waves on a string are another example. The string is displaced up and down, as the wave travels from left to right, but the string itself does not experience any net motion. A light wave is a transverse wave. If you look at the waves on the sea they seem to move in one direction. . towards you. However, the particles that make up the wave only move up and down. Look at the animation, on the right, although the wave seems to be moving from left to right the blue particle is only moving up and down. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 8

Sine waves • • • The sine wave is unique in that it represents Sine waves • • • The sine wave is unique in that it represents energy entirely concentrated at a single frequency. An ideal wireless signal has a sine waveform With a frequency usually measured in cycles per second or Hertz (Hz). A million cycles per second is represented by megahertz (MHz). A billion cycles per second represented by gigahertz (GHz). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 9

Sine waves Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 2 Amplitude and Frequency • • Sine waves Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 2 Amplitude and Frequency • • Amplitude – The distance from zero to the maximum value of each alternation is called the amplitude. – The amplitude of the positive alternation and the amplitude of the negative alternation are the same. Period – The time it takes for a sine wave to complete one cycle is defined as the period of the waveform. – The distance traveled by the sine wave during this period is referred to as its wavelength. Wavelength – Indicated by the Greek lambda symbol λ. – It is the distance between one value to the same value on the next cycle. Frequency – The number of repetitions or cycles per unit time is the frequency, typically expressed in cycles per second, or Hertz (Hz). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 10

Relationship between time and frequency • The inverse relationship between time (t), the period Relationship between time and frequency • The inverse relationship between time (t), the period in seconds, and frequency (f), in Hz, is indicated by the following formulas: t = 1/f (time = 1 / frequency) f = 1/t (frequency = 1 / time) Examples: 1 second • t = 1/f 1 second = 1 / 1 Hz (1 cycle per second) • f = 1/t 1 Hz = 1 / 1 second ½ second • t = 1/f ½ second = 1 / 2 Hz (2 cycles per second) • f = 1/t 2 Hz = 1 / ½ second 1/10, 000 th of a second • t = 1/f 1/10, 000 th of a second = 1 / 10, 000 Hz (cycles/sec) = 1 / 10 MHz • f = 1/t 10 MHz = 1 / 1/10, 000 th of sec Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 11

Sine waves Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 2 Amplitude, Frequency, and Phase 180° Sine waves Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 2 Amplitude, Frequency, and Phase 180° Phase Shift • • One full period or cycle of a sine wave is said to cover 360 degrees (360°). It is possible for one sine wave to lead or lag another sine wave by any number of degrees, except zero or 360. When two sine waves differ by exactly zero° or 360°, the two waves are said to be in phase. Two sine waves that differ in phase by any other value are out of phase, with respect to each other. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 12

Analog to digital conversion Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 3 1. 2. 3. Analog to digital conversion Go to interactive activity 3. 1. 3 1. 2. 3. Analog wave amplitudes are sampled at specific instances in time. Each sample is assigned a discrete value. Each discrete value is converted to a stream of bits. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 13

Bandwidth • There are two common ways of looking at bandwidth: – Analog bandwidth Bandwidth • There are two common ways of looking at bandwidth: – Analog bandwidth – Digital bandwidth • Analog bandwidth – Analog bandwidth can refer to the range of frequencies. – Analog bandwidth is described in units of frequency, or cycles per second, which is measured in Hz. – There is a direct correlation between the analog bandwidth of any medium and the data rate in bits per second that the medium can support. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 14

Bandwidth • Digital bandwidth – Digital bandwidth is a measure of how much information Bandwidth • Digital bandwidth – Digital bandwidth is a measure of how much information can flow from one place to another, in a given amount of time. – Digital bandwidth is measured in bits per second. – When dealing with data communications, the term bandwidth most often signifies digital bandwidth. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 15

EM (Electromagnetic) Spectrum EM (Electromagnetic) Spectrum

Basics of EM waves • • EM (Electromagnetic) spectrum a set of all types Basics of EM waves • • EM (Electromagnetic) spectrum a set of all types of radiation when discussed as a group. Radiation is energy that travels in waves and spreads out over distance. The visible light that comes from a lamp in a house and radio waves that come from a radio station are two types of electromagnetic waves. Other examples are microwaves, infrared light, ultraviolet light, X-rays, and gamma rays. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 17

Basics of EM waves • • All EM waves travel at the speed of Basics of EM waves • • All EM waves travel at the speed of light in a vacuum and have a characteristic wavelength (λ) and frequency (f), which can be determined by using the following equation: c = λ x f, where c = the speed of light (3 x 108 m/s) Wavelength x Frequency = Speed of light = 180, 000 miles/sec or 300, 000 kilometers/sec or 300, 000 meters/sec Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 18

Basics of EM waves 300, 000 kilometers or 180, 000 miles 150, 000 km Basics of EM waves 300, 000 kilometers or 180, 000 miles 150, 000 km • • wavelength (λ), frequency (f), speed of light (c) A wave of 1 cycle per second, has a wavelength of 300, 000 meters or 300, 000 kilometers or 180, 000 miles. • Speed of a bit doesn’t go beyond the speed of light, Dr. Einstein says we all go “poof” (my words, not his) • Speed is a function of increasing the number of waves, bits, in the Rick same amount of space, I. e. bits per second Graziani [email protected] edu 19

Basics of EM waves • Other interesting calculations Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 20 Basics of EM waves • Other interesting calculations Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 20

Size of a Wave Size of a Wave

Size of a Wave • It’s important to visualize the physical size of a Size of a Wave • It’s important to visualize the physical size of a wireless signal because the physical size determines: – How that signal interacts with its environment – How well it is propagated from antenna to antenna – The physical size of the antenna (the smaller the signal size, the smaller the antenna) Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 22

Speed of Light Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec or 300, 000 meters/sec Speed of Light Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec or 300, 000 meters/sec (approx. ) Start here End here 1 second 186, 000 miles Mile: 0 Mile: 186, 000 1 mile • 5, 280 feet per mile; so 186, 000 miles = 982, 080, 000 feet • 63, 360 inches per mile; so 186, 000 miles = 11, 784, 960, 000 inches Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 23

All About Wavelength http: //eosweb. larc. nasa. gov/EDDOCS/wavelength. html • • • Speed of All About Wavelength http: //eosweb. larc. nasa. gov/EDDOCS/wavelength. html • • • Speed of the wave = Frequency x Wavelength = Speed of the wave or speed of light / Frequency Speed of light = – 186, 000 miles/sec or – 982, 080, 000 feet/sec or – 11, 784, 960, 000 inches/sec Wavelength = Speed of the wave or speed of light/ Frequency 10. 93 feet = 982, 080, 000 feet per sec / 90, 000 cycles per sec Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 24

Speed of Light Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: 0, beginning of Speed of Light Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long Mile: 186, 000, end of rope 0 seconds After 1/2 second After 1 second 0 second 1 second • • Length of rope 186, 000 miles long traveling at the speed of light, 186, 000 miles/second In 1 second we would see the entire length of rope go by. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 25

Speed of Light – 1 Hz Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: Speed of Light – 1 Hz Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long Mile: 186, 000, end of rope 186, 000 miles 0 second 1 second • • So, if 1 Hz is 1 cycle per second, traveling at the speed of light…. The length of the wave would be 186, 000 miles long (300, 000 meters). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 26

Speed of Light – 2 Hz Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: Speed of Light – 2 Hz Speed of light = 186, 000 miles/sec Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long Mile: 186, 000, end of rope 93, 000 miles 0 second 1 second • • 2 Hz is 2 cycles per second, traveling at the speed of light…. The length of each wave would be 186, 000/2 or 93, 000 miles long (150, 000 meters). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 27

Speed of Light – Let’s do inches 11, 784, 960, 000 inches 6, 000, Speed of Light – Let’s do inches 11, 784, 960, 000 inches 6, 000, 000 inches • • 11, 784, 960, 000 inches in a mile 1 Hz wave = 11, 784, 960, 000 inches (11 billion inches) 2 Hz wave = 11, 784, 960, 000 / 2 = 6 billion inches (give or take) What would a wave the size of 11 GHz wave be? Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 28

Speed of Light – Lets do inches Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of Speed of Light – Lets do inches Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long 1 2 Length of rope 11. 8 billion inches long Mile: 186, 000, end of rope 11 billion … 1 inch 0 second • • • 1 second What would a wave the size of 11 GHz wave be? Size of the rope divided by the number of pieces = size of each piece About 1 inch! (11, 784, 960, 000 in. per sec / 11, 000, 000 pieces or cycles or Hz) Same as slicing up the 186, 000 mile rope into 11 billion equal pieces. Each piece is 1 inch, 11 billion pieces equal 11 billion inches, the size of our rope traveling at 186, 000 miles per second. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 29

Speed of Light – Lets do inches Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of Speed of Light – Lets do inches Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long 1 Length of rope 11. 8 billion inches long 2 1 billion 11. 8 inches 0 second • • Mile: 186, 000, end of rope … 1 second What would a wave the size of 1 GHz wave be? 11 inches! (Actually, 11. 8 inches because we rounded off values. ) (approx. : 11, 784, 960, 000 inches per sec / 1, 000, 000 cycles per sec) • Same as slicing up the 186, 000 mile rope into 1 billion equal pieces. • Each piece is 11 inches, 1 billion pieces equal 11 billion inches, the size of our Rick rope traveling at 186, 000 miles per second. Graziani [email protected] edu 30

RADM Grace Hopper • • • Grace Hopper, “Mother of Cobol” The size of RADM Grace Hopper • • • Grace Hopper, “Mother of Cobol” The size of a nanosecond, 11. 8 inches The distance the speed of light travels in a billionth of a second. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 31

Size of a 2. 4 GHz WLAN wave Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length Size of a 2. 4 GHz WLAN wave Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long Length of rope 11. 8 billion inches long 1 2 2. 4 billion 4. 8 inches 0 second • • Mile: 186, 000, end of rope … 1 second Same as slicing up the 186, 000 mile rope into 2. 4 billion equal pieces. Each piece is 4. 8 inches or 12 cm (. 12 meters) (approx. : 11, 784, 960, 000 inches per sec / 2, 450, 000 cycles per sec) • 2. 4 billion pieces equal 11 billion inches, the size of our rope traveling at 186, 000 miles per second. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 32

Size of a 5. 8 GHz WLAN wave Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length Size of a 5. 8 GHz WLAN wave Mile: 0, beginning of rope Length of rope 186, 000 miles long Length of rope 11. 8 billion inches long 1 2 5. 8 billion 2 inches 0 second • • Mile: 186, 000, end of rope … 1 second Same as slicing up the 186, 000 mile rope into 5. 8 billion equal pieces. Each piece is 2 inches or 5 cm (. 05 meters) (approx. : 11, 784, 960, 000 inches per sec / 5, 800, 000 cycles per sec) • 5. 8 billion pieces equal 11 billion inches, the size of our rope traveling at 186, 000 miles per second. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 33

Basics of EM Waves Basics of EM Waves

Basics of EM waves • • • EM waves exhibit the following properties: – Basics of EM waves • • • EM waves exhibit the following properties: – reflection or bouncing – refraction or bending – diffraction or spreading around obstacles – scattering or being redirected by particles This will be discussed in greater detail later in this module. Also, the frequency and the wavelength of an EM wave are inversely proportionally to one another. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 35

Basics of EM waves • There a number of properties that apply to all Basics of EM waves • There a number of properties that apply to all EM waves, including: – Direction – Frequency – Wavelength – Power – Polarization – Phase. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 36

EM Spectrum Chart • • One of the most important diagrams in both science EM Spectrum Chart • • One of the most important diagrams in both science and engineering is the chart of the EM spectrum. The typical EM spectrum diagram summarizes the ranges of frequencies, or bands that are important to understanding many things in nature and technology. EM waves can be classified according to their frequency in Hz or their wavelength in meters. The most important range for this course is the RF (Radio Frequency) spectrum. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 37

EM Spectrum Chart • • • The RF spectrum includes several frequency bands including: EM Spectrum Chart • • • The RF spectrum includes several frequency bands including: – Microwave – Ultra High Frequencies (UHF) – Very High Frequencies (VHF) This is also where WLANs operate. The RF spectrum ranges from 9 k. Hz to 300 GHz. Consists of two major sections of the EM spectrum: (RF Spectrum) – Radio Waves – Microwaves. The RF frequencies, which cover a significant portion of the EM radiation spectrum, are used heavily for communications. Most of the RF ranges are licensed, though a few key ranges are unlicensed. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 38

EM Spectrum Chart Nasa. gov Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 39 EM Spectrum Chart Nasa. gov Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 39

Nasa. gov Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 40 Nasa. gov Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 40

Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu www. britishlibrary. net 41 Rick Graziani [email protected] edu www. britishlibrary. net 41

Licensed Frequencies • Frequency bands have a limited number of useable different frequencies, or Licensed Frequencies • Frequency bands have a limited number of useable different frequencies, or communications channels. • Many parts of the EM spectrum are not useable for communications and many parts of the spectrum are already used extensively for this purpose. • The electromagnetic spectrum is a finite resource. • One way to allocate this limited, shared resource is to have international and national institutions that set standards and laws as to how the spectrum can be used. • In the US, it is the FCC that regulates spectrum use. • In Europe, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) regulates the spectrum usage. • Frequency bands that require a license to operate within are called the licensed spectrum. • Examples include amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) radio, ham or short wave radio, cell phones, broadcast television, aviation bands, and many others. • In order to operate a device in a licensed band, the user must first Rick apply for and be granted the appropriate license. Graziani [email protected] edu 42

ISM (Industrial, Scientific, and Medical) & U-NII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) • • • ISM (Industrial, Scientific, and Medical) & U-NII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) • • • Some areas of the spectrum have been left unlicensed. This is favorable for certain applications, such as WLANs. An important area of the unlicensed spectrum is known as the industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands and the U-NII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) – ISM – 802. 11 b, 802. 11 g – U-NII – 802. 11 a • These bands are unlicensed in most countries of the world. • The following are some examples of the regulated items that are related to WLANs: – The FCC has defined eleven 802. 11 b DSSS channels and their corresponding center frequencies. ETSI has defined 13. – The FCC requires that all antennas that are sold by a spread spectrum vendor be certified with the radio with which it is sold. • Unlicensed bands are generally license-free, provided that devices are low power. • After all, you don’t need to license your microwave oven or portable phone. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 43

Fourier synthesis (More than we need…) • • When two EM waves occupy the Fourier synthesis (More than we need…) • • When two EM waves occupy the same space, their effects combine to form a new wave of a different shape. For example, air pressure changes caused by two sound waves added together. Jean Baptiste Fourier is responsible for one of the great mathematical discoveries. He proved that a special sum of sine waves, of harmonically related frequencies, could be added together to create any wave pattern. Harmonically related frequencies are simply frequencies that are multiples of some basic frequency. Use the interactive activity to create multiple sine waves and a complex wave that is formed from the additive effects of the individual waves. Finally, a square wave, or a square pulse, can be built by using the right combination of sine waves. The importance of this will be clarified when modulation is discussed. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 44

Fourier synthesis Go to interactive activity 3. 3. 3 Whatis. com • Fourier synthesis Fourier synthesis Go to interactive activity 3. 3. 3 Whatis. com • Fourier synthesis is a method of electronically constructing a signal with a specific, desired periodic waveform. • It works by combining a sine wave signal and sine-wave or cosinewave harmonics (signals at multiples of the lowest, or fundamental, frequency) in certain proportions. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 45

http: //www. sfu. ca/sonic-studio/handbook/Fourier_Synthesis. html Sound Example: Addition of the first 14 sine wave http: //www. sfu. ca/sonic-studio/handbook/Fourier_Synthesis. html Sound Example: Addition of the first 14 sine wave harmonics resulting in the successive approximation of a sawtooth wave. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 46

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PLCP PMD Note: The information presented here is just 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PLCP PMD Note: The information presented here is just to introduce these terms and concepts. Many of the “how’s” and “why’s” are beyond the scope of this material. Don’t get lost in the detail!

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • • We have looked at the data link 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • • We have looked at the data link layer, now we will look at the physical layer. As you can see there are multiple physical layer technologies involved with both similarities and differences between them. The job of the PHYs is to provide the wireless transmission mechanisms for the MAC. By keeping the PHY transmission mechanisms independent of the MAC it allows for advances in both of these areas. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 48

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • The physical layer is divided into two sublayers: 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • The physical layer is divided into two sublayers: – PLCP (Physical Layer Convergence Procedure) – PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) • All of this is needed to help ensure that the data goes from the receiver to the transmitter over this “hostile” wireless environment with noise, and all kinds of “mean, nasty ugly things”. (Arlo Guthrie) Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 49

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PLCP (Physical Layer Convergence Procedure) • All PLCPs provide 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PLCP (Physical Layer Convergence Procedure) • All PLCPs provide the interface to transfer data octets between the MAC and the PMD. • “Primitives” (fields) that tell the PMD when to begin and end communications. • The PCLP is the “handshaking layer” that enables the MAC protocol data units (MPDUs), fancy name for MAC frame, to be transmitted between the MAC over the PMD. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 50

PLCP (Physical Layer Convergence Procedure) General 802. 11 Frame L IP Packet L C PLCP (Physical Layer Convergence Procedure) General 802. 11 Frame L IP Packet L C PDSU • • • PPDU (PLCP Protocol Data Unit) adds “encapsulation” The PDSU (PLCP Data Service Unit) is the data the PCLP is responsible for delivering. – Depending upon the protocol the encapsulated MAC frame is sometimes called the PSDU (PLCP Service Data Unit) or MPDU (MAC Protocol Data Unit). All these acronyms! You got to be kidding! More on this after the PMD concepts Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 51

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) • The PMD is responsible 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) • The PMD is responsible for transmitting the actual bits it receives from the PLCP into the air, over the wireless, and sometimes hostile, medium. • The PHY concepts and building blocks are: ü Scrambling ü Coding ü Interleaving ü Symbol mapping and modulation • Let’s look at these to see what wireless technologies do in order to help transmit bits over a hostile wireless medium and increase the chance that the information can be read by the receiver. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 52

PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) Original Data Bits Scrambler Scrambled Data Bits Transmission Medium Original PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) Original Data Bits Scrambler Scrambled Data Bits Transmission Medium Original Data Bits • Descrambler Scrambled Data Bits Scrambling – A method for sending and receiving data to make it look more random than it is. – Receivers do not tend to like long strings of 0’s or 1’s. – The data is scrambled by the transmitter and descrambled by the receiver. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 53

PMD - Coding Noise Spread Signal of coded bits • Frequency Coding – After PMD - Coding Noise Spread Signal of coded bits • Frequency Coding – After the data is scrambled it is coded. – Coding is a mechanism that enables high transmission over a noisy channel (like wireless). – Coding does this by replacing sequences with longer sequences. – An example of a coding: • Scrambled data: 01101 • Coded data: 000000 111111 X • Transmission: 000000 X X 111111 X 000000 111111 – The idea is that multiple bits are sent so if some bits can are corrupted (interference), the receiver can still determine the original bits. – This is effective because noise tends to happen in relative pulses and not across the entire frequency band. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 54

802. 11 Chipping Sequence – Barker Sequence Scrambled Data Bit 1 Expanded Data Bit 802. 11 Chipping Sequence – Barker Sequence Scrambled Data Bit 1 Expanded Data Bit Transmitted Chipped Sequence 111111 XOR 10110111000 01001000111 Barker Sequence • • 802. 11 encodes data by taking 1 Mbps data stream into an 11 MHz chip stream. The spreading sequence or chipping sequence or Barker sequence. Converts a data bit into chips, 11 bits. – 0 into 000000 – 1 into 111111 The expanded data bit is then exclusive ORed (XORed) with a spreading sequence (Barker) resulting in the chipped sequence which is transmitted over the wireless medium. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 55

802. 11 Chipping Sequence – Barker Sequence Original Data Bit XOR 1 0 XOR 802. 11 Chipping Sequence – Barker Sequence Original Data Bit XOR 1 0 XOR 0 -> 0 1 XOR 1 -> 0 0 XOR 1 -> 1 Either one Scrambled Data Bit 1 Expanded Data Bit Transmitted Chipped Sequence 111111 XOR 10110111000 01001000111 Barker Sequence Scrambled Data Bit 0 Expanded Data Bit Transmitted Chipped Sequence 000000 XOR 10110111000 Barker Sequence Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 56

PMD Concepts and Building Blocks Original Data Bits • • • Scrambler Sometimes bit PMD Concepts and Building Blocks Original Data Bits • • • Scrambler Sometimes bit errors are not independent events but occur in batches, or bursts. Because of this, interleavers are used to spread out adjacent bits and block of error that might occur. The idea it to spread out the adjacent bits. It might get a couple of us, but it can’t get us all (hopefully). This along with the chipping sequence increases the chances that data still can be read by the receiver even with large blocks of data. We won’t go into the detail here. Original Data Bits Rick Graziani [email protected] edu Descrambler Block Coder Block Interleaver Modulated over Transmission Medium Block Interleaver Block Decoder 57

PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) • • The PMD is responsible for transmitting the actual PMD (Physical Medium Dependent) • • The PMD is responsible for transmitting the actual bits it receives from the PLCP into the air, over the wireless, and sometimes hostile, medium. – Scrambling – Coding – Interleaving – Symbol mapping and modulation These help transmit bits over a hostile wireless medium and increase the chance that the information can be read by the receiver. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 58

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies FHSS – 802. 11 DSSS- 802. 11 HR/DSSS – 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies FHSS – 802. 11 DSSS- 802. 11 HR/DSSS – 802. 11 b OFDM – 802. 11 a ERP – 802. 11 g

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • • The radio-based physical layers in 802. 11 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies • • The radio-based physical layers in 802. 11 use three different spread-spectrum techniques: In 1997, the initial revision of 802. 11 included: – Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) – Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) – 802. 11 – Infrared (IR) In 1999, two more physical layers were developed: – Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) – 802. 11 a – High-Rate Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (HR/DSSS) – 802. 11 b In 2003, 802. 11 g was introduced which uses both HR/DSSS and OFDM: – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer - 802. 11 g Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 60

802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies Original 802. 11 Frequency allocation in the EM spectrum 802. 11 Physical Layer Technologies Original 802. 11 Frequency allocation in the EM spectrum • Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) • Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) – 802. 11 • Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) – 802. 11 a • High-Rate Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (HR/DSSS) – 802. 11 b • Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer - 802. 11 g Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 61

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS)

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) WLANs support 1 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • Frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) WLANs support 1 Mbps and 2 Mbps data rates. Widely deployed in the early days (1997) of WLANs. Electronics relatively inexpensive and had low power requirements. Uses unlicensed 2. 4 GHz ISM (Industrial, Scientific, and Medical) band Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 63

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • Uses 79 non-overlapping channels. Across 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • Uses 79 non-overlapping channels. Across 2. 402 to 2. 480 GHz band Each channel is 1 MHz wide. Frequency hopping depends on rapidly changing the transmission frequency in a pseudo-random pattern, known as the hopping code. The initial advantage of using FHSS networks was the greater number of networks that could coexist with relatively high throughput and low collisions. With the advent of HR/DSSS this is no longer an advantage. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 64

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • The transmitter uses this hop 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • The transmitter uses this hop sequence to select its transmission frequency. The carrier will remain at a given frequency for a specified period of time, which is referred to as the dwell time. The transmitter will then use a small amount of time, referred to as the hop time, to move to the next frequency. When the list of frequencies has been completely traversed, the transmitter will start over and repeat the sequence. The receiver radio is synchronized to the hopping sequence of the transmitting radio to enable the receiver to be on the right frequency at the right time. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 65

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • FHSS radio hops between all 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) • • • FHSS radio hops between all of these channels in one of 78 orthogonal (non-colliding) patterns. Devices use all available channels equally in a 30 second period, about 0. 4 seconds per channel. Note: Since FHSS is no longer used in 802. 11 (a, b, g) we will not go into any more detail nor discuss the PLCP or modulation. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 66

802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) DSSS (Spread Spectrum) Signal (22 MHz) FHSS Signal 802. 11 - Frequency-hopping spreadspectrum (FHSS) DSSS (Spread Spectrum) Signal (22 MHz) FHSS Signal (1 MHz) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Frequency MHz Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 67

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS)

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • • Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) defined in 1997 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • • Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) defined in 1997 802. 11 standard. Supports data rates of 1 Mbps and 2 Mbps – In 1999 802. 11 introduced 802. 11 b standard (HR/DSSS) to support 5. 5 Mbps and 11 Mbps, which is backwards compatible with 802. 11 (later). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 69

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • • • DSSS uses 22 MHz channels 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • • • DSSS uses 22 MHz channels in the 2. 4 to 2. 483 GHz range. This allows for three non-overlapping channels (three channels that can coexist or overlap without causing interference), channels 1, 6 and 11 (coming). Uses 2. 4 GHz ISM band Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 70

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) DSSS (Spread Spectrum) Signal (22 MHz) FHSS Signal 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) DSSS (Spread Spectrum) Signal (22 MHz) FHSS Signal (1 MHz) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Frequency MHz Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 71

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) General 802. 11 Frame L IP Packet L 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) General 802. 11 Frame L IP Packet L C PDSU • • DSSS adds the following fields to the MAC frame to form the DSSS PPDU (PLCP Protocol Data Unit). We will look at these fields which will give us a better understanding of how the physical layer delivers bits over a wireless medium. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 72

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) PDSU PLCP Preamble • Sync– Provides synchronization for 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) PDSU PLCP Preamble • Sync– Provides synchronization for the receiving station. • SFD (Start of Frame Delimiter) – Provides timing for the receiving station. PCLP Header • Signal – Specifies the modulation and data rate) for the frame – DBPSK – 1 Mbps (PLCP Preamble and Header always sent at this rate) – DQPSK – 2 Mbps • Service – For future use • Length – Number of microseconds required to transmit the MAC portion of the frame. • CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check) – CRC check for PCLP header fields. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 73

PLCP and MAC Error Statistics Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 74 PLCP and MAC Error Statistics Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 74

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) Modulation • DBPSK – 1 Mbps – Differential 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) Modulation • DBPSK – 1 Mbps – Differential Binary Phase Shift Keying – One bit per phase change, two phases – Each chip maps to a single symbol – Uses one phase to represent a binary 1 and another to represent a binary 0, for a total of one bit of binary data. • DQPSK – 2 Mbps – Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keying – Two bits per phase change, four phases – Maps two chips per symbol – Uses four phases, each representing two bits. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 75

802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • 802. 11 DSSS – 802. 11 DSSS 802. 11 - Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS) • 802. 11 DSSS – 802. 11 DSSS uses a rate of 11 million chips per second or 1 million 11 -bit Barker words per second. – These 11 bit Barker words are transmitted over the 22 MHz spread spectrum at 1 million times per second. – Each word is encoded as either 1 -bit or 2 -bits, corresponding with either 1. 0 Mbps or 2. 0 Mbps respectively. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 76

802. 11 b - High-Rate Directsequence spread-spectrum (HR/DSSS) 802. 11 b - High-Rate Directsequence spread-spectrum (HR/DSSS)

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • In 1999 802. 11 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • In 1999 802. 11 introduced 802. 11 b standard (HR/DSSS) Data rates of 1 Mbps, 2 Mbps, 5. 5 Mbps and 11 Mbps Backwards compatible with 802. 11 Uses 2. 4 GHz ISM band Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 78

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • HR/DSSS uses 22 MHz 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • HR/DSSS uses 22 MHz channels in the 2. 4 to 2. 483 GHz range. This allows for three non-overlapping channels (three channels that can coexist or overlap without causing interference), channels 1, 6 and 11 (coming). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 79

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) (Once again) • HR/DSSS uses 22 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) (Once again) • HR/DSSS uses 22 MHz channels in the 2. 4 to 2. 483 GHz range. • This allows for three non-overlapping channels (three channels that can coexist or overlap without causing interference), channels 1, 6 and 11 (coming). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 80

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 81 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 81

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) Long Short • • There are 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) Long Short • • There are two PPDU frame types: – Long – Same as DSSS PPDU – Short – (above) The short PPDU minimizes overhead. The long PPD maintains backward compatibility with 802. 11 Both are basically the same PPDU as DSSS, except: – Signal field includes addition data rates for 5. 5 Mbps and 11 Mbps Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 82

ACU HELP Information • Enables short radio headers. You can enable the client adapter ACU HELP Information • Enables short radio headers. You can enable the client adapter to use short radio headers only if the access point is also enabled to support short radio headers and is currently using them for all connected client adapters. If an access point connects to any client adapters that are using long headers, all client adapters in that cell must also use long headers, even if both your client adapter and the access point have enabled short radio headers. • Short radio headers improve throughput. Long radio headers ensure compatibility with client adapters and access points that do not support short radio headers. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 83

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • • Remember 802. 11 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • • Remember 802. 11 DSSS: – 802. 11 DSSS uses a rate of 11 million chips per second or 1 million 11 -bit Barker words per second. – These 11 -bit Barker words are transmitted over the 22 MHz spread spectrum at 1 million times per second. – Each word is encoded as either 1 -bit or 2 -bits, corresponding with either 1. 0 Mbps or 2. 0 Mbps respectively. Regular phase shift encoding can only carry a few bits as detecting smaller phase shifts requires more sophisticated and expensive electronics. IEEE 802. 11 developed an alternative encoding method to Barker (802. 11), the CCK (Complementary Code Keying). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 84

802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • 802. 11 b uses 802. 11 b - High-Rate Direct-sequence spreadspectrum (HR/DSSS) • • 802. 11 b uses CCK (Complementary Code Keying) instead of Barker. CCK uses an 8 -bit complex chip code. Based on sophisticated mathematics. – CCK uses a set of 64 8 -bit code words – These code words have unique mathematical properties that allow a receiver to distinguish them correctly from each other. – The 5. 5 Mbps rate uses CCK to encode 4 -bits per carrier. – The 11 Mbps rate uses CCK to encode 8 -bits per carrier. Like DSSS 2 Mbps data rate, both the 5. 5 Mbps and 11 Mbps rates uses DQPSK modulation technique. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 85

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing)

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • • In 1999 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • • In 1999 802. 11 introduced 802. 11 a standard same time as 802. 11 b Uses OFDM encoding. Data rates from 6 Mbps, to 54 Mbps Not compatible with 802. 11 b Uses 5 GHz band U-NII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure). Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 87

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • Because 802. 11 a 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • Because 802. 11 a uses a higher frequency its devices require higher power, which means they use up more precious battery power on laptops and portable devices. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 88

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • 802. 11 a U-NII 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • 802. 11 a U-NII bands (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) – 5. 15 GHz to 5. 25 GHz – 5. 25 GHz to 5. 35 GHz – 5. 725 GHz to 5. 825 GHz Rick Graziani [email protected]abrillo. edu 89

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 4 8 • • • 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 4 8 • • • Uses four 20 MHz channels in each of the three U-NII bands Each 20 MHz 802. 11 a channel occupies four channels in the U-NII band (36 – 39, 40 – 43, etc. ) Offers 8 lower and mid-band non-interfering channels – As opposed to 3 with 802. 11 b/g – Not all cards accept the upper band frequencies Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 90

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. html • Offers 8 lower and mid-band non-interfering channels – As opposed to 3 with 802. 11 b/g Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 91

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • The fields are 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • The fields are similar to other PPDU frame formats 802. 11 and 802. 11 b. The Signal field specifies the data frame for the DATA part of the frame: 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 54 Mbps. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 92

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. html • • • OFDM works by breaking one high-speed data carrier into several lower-speed subcarriers, which are then transmitted in parallel. Each high-speed carrier is 20 MHz wide and is broken up into 52 subchannels, each approximately 300 KHz wide. OFDM uses 48 of these subchannels for data, while the remaining four are used for error correction. OFDM uses the spectrum much more efficiently by spacing the channels much closer together. The spectrum is more efficient because all of the carriers are orthogonal to one another, thus preventing interference between closely spaced carriers. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 93

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. html • • Orthogonal is a mathematical term derived from the Greek word orthos, meaning straight, right, or true. In mathematics, the word orthogonal is used to describe independent items. Orthogonality is best seen in the frequency domain, looking at a spectral analysis of a signal. OFDM works because the frequencies of the subcarriers are selected in such a way that, for each subcarrier frequency, all other subcarriers will not contribute to the overall waveform. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 94

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) www. networkcomputing. com/1201 ws 1. html • It is the different frequencies used (5 GHz and 2. 4 GHz) and the different structure of the operating channels (OFDM and DSSSHR/DSSS) that makes 802. 11 a incompatible with 802. 11 b devices. • There are “dual band” access points that can operate in multimodes (802. 11 a, b and g) – coming. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 95

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 48 subchannels for data • 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 48 subchannels for data • • • OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) is a mix of different modulation schemes to achieve data rates from 6 to 54 Mbps. Each subchannel in the OFDM implementation is about 300 KHz wide. 802. 11 a uses different types of modulation, depending upon the data rate used. The 802. 11 a standard specifies that all 802. 11 a-compliant products must support three modulation schemes. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 96

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 48 subchannels for data (How 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) 48 subchannels for data (How the modulation works is not important here. ) • BPSK (Binary Phase Shift Keying) – 1 bit per subchannel • QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) – 2 bits per subchannel • 16 QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Moduation) – 4 bits using 16 symbols • 64 QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Moduation) – 6 bits using 64 symbols Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 97

802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • • Coded orthogonal 802. 11 a – OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) • • • Coded orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (COFDM) delivers higher data rates and a high degree of multipath reflection recovery, thanks to its encoding scheme and error correction. The OFDM signal is subject to narrowband interference or deep fading. When this occurs the channel’s ability to carry data may go to zero because the received amplitude is so low. To keep a few faded channels from driving the bit error to high, OFDM applies an error correction code COFDM across all the subchannels. COFDM is beyond the scope of this curriculum. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 98

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer • • • IEEE 802. 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer • • • IEEE 802. 11 g standard was approved on June 2003. Introduces ERP, Extended Rate Physical layer support for data rate up to 54 Mbps. 2. 4 GHz ISM band Borrows OFDM techniques from 802. 11 a Backwards compatible with 802. 11 b devices Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 100

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer 802. 11 g • • 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer 802. 11 g • • 802. 11 g 802. 11 b 802. 11 g Rates up to 54 Mbps (802. 11 g) 802. 11 g Lower rates In an environment with only 802. 11 g devices, transmission will occur at the highest data rates that the signals allow. As soon as an 802. 11 b device is introduced to the BSS, 802. 11 b device(s) can only operate at 802. 11 data rates. 802. 11 g devices will have lower data rates, however there are contradictions on what that is. Some documentation states that it will be at 802. 11 b rates. Other documentation states that it will be at 802. 11 g rates but with additional overhead causing overall throughput to decrease. (I will test this. ) Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 101

802. 11 g / 802. 11 b Compatibility Can’t hear 802. 11 g OFDM 802. 11 g / 802. 11 b Compatibility Can’t hear 802. 11 g OFDM messages during CCA (Clear Channel Assessment), so will transmit and may cause collisions 802. 11 b 802. 11 g compatibility with 802. 11 b, From the Broadband. com White Paper • Protection Mechanisms: “Air Traffic Control” – 802. 11 b radios do not hear the 802. 11 g OFDM signals. – Protections mechanisms prevent 802. 11 b clients from transmitting, thinking the medium is free, when 802. 11 g devices are transmitting. – 802. 11 g devices still communicate at the 802. 11 g data rates when protection is in use. – 802. 11 g devices must transmit a short 802. 11 b rate message signal to 802. 11 b products to not transmit for a specified duration, because an 802. 11 g OFDM message is being transmitted. – The 802. 11 b protection message causes additional overhead and reduced throughput for the 802. 11 g devices when at least one 802. 11 b device is present. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 102

802. 11 g / 802. 11 b Compatibility RTS/CTS CTS-to-self CTS RTS 802. 11 802. 11 g / 802. 11 b Compatibility RTS/CTS CTS-to-self CTS RTS 802. 11 b 802. 11 g CTS 802. 11 b 802. 11 g compatibility with 802. 11 b, From the Broadband. com White Paper • Two 802. 11 Protection Mechanism Standards: RTS/CTS and CTS-to-self – RTS/CTS protection mechanism is the same 802. 11 MAC operation earlier discussed between the 802. 11 g client and the AP, with all devices, including 802. 11 b, hearing the CTS from the AP. – CTS-to-self protection mechanism sends a CTS message, using an 802. 11 b data rate, instead of the AP doing it, followed immediately my the 802. 11 g message. • In either case, 802. 11 g throughput is still greater than the 802. 11 b throughput at the same distance. • Maximum 802. 11 g throughput with mixed clients is 15 Mbps, or a data rate of about 33 Mbps. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 103

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer 802. 11 g uses 5 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer 802. 11 g uses 5 PPDU formats Long PPDU for 802. 11 and 802. 11 b compatibility Short PPDU for 802. 11 b compatibility Data Rates 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48 and 54 Mbps Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 104

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer “Long PPDU” “Short PPDU” 802. 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer “Long PPDU” “Short PPDU” 802. 11 b compatibility: Backwards compatibility with 802. 11 b compatibility: Minimizes overhead 802. 11 g: Higher data rates Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 105

802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer • • The four lower 802. 11 g – Extended Rate Physical (ERP) layer • • The four lower data rates of 802. 11 g (1, 2, 5. 5, 11 Mbps), like 802. 11 b uses CCK (Complementary Code Keying) - (802. 11 uses Barker). – CCK uses an 8 -bit complex chip code. – Based on sophisticated mathematics. – CCK allows for the backward compatibility with 802. 11 b The higher data rates of 802. 11 g (6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 54 Mbps) uses COFDM (like 802. 11 a). – 802. 11 a is not compatible with 802. 11 g, different frequencies. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 106

Comparing 802. 11 a, 802. 11 b, 802. 11 g Comparing 802. 11 a, 802. 11 b, 802. 11 g

Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 108 Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 108

Data Rates at Varying Distances 5 GHz radio signals do not propagate as well Data Rates at Varying Distances 5 GHz radio signals do not propagate as well as 2. 4 GHz radio signals, so 802. 11 a devices are limited in range compared to 802. 11 b and 802. 11 g devices. Broadband. com Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 109

Relative Ranges Broadband. com • 802. 11 a requires more APs for the same Relative Ranges Broadband. com • 802. 11 a requires more APs for the same coverage area. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 110

Expected Throughputs Broadband. com • Throughput includes overhead including MAC frame and MAC operations, Expected Throughputs Broadband. com • Throughput includes overhead including MAC frame and MAC operations, PLCP header, etc. . Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 111

WLAN User Requirements and Technology Characteristics Broadband. com • • It is forecasted that WLAN User Requirements and Technology Characteristics Broadband. com • • It is forecasted that 802. 11 g will quickly replace 802. 11 b. 802. 11 g Access Points automatically support 802. 11 b. Dual-band 802. 11 a/g and 802. 11 g Access Points become the two technologies to consider when migrating to 802. 11 g from 802. 11 b networks. Dual-band 802. 11 a/b Access Points become immediately obsolete. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 112

ACU and various client adapters • Cisco ACU works with all adapters. Rick Graziani ACU and various client adapters • Cisco ACU works with all adapters. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 113

ACU and various client adapters • • Once the initial ACU application is downloaded ACU and various client adapters • • Once the initial ACU application is downloaded and installed for one adapter, you need to download and install it for any other adapters as well. Subsequent installation will only install the drivers associated with that adapter. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 114

ACU and various client adapters • You can use the same profiles with the ACU and various client adapters • You can use the same profiles with the different adapters. Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 115

PLCP and MAC Error Statistics Rick Graziani graziani@cabrillo. edu 116 PLCP and MAC Error Statistics Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 116

http: //www. cisco. com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps 4555/pr oducts_data_sheet 09186 a 00801 ebc 29. html Rick Graziani http: //www. cisco. com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps 4555/pr oducts_data_sheet 09186 a 00801 ebc 29. html Rick Graziani [email protected] edu 117

Ch. 2 – 802. 11 and NICs Part 3 – 802. 11 PHY Cisco Ch. 2 – 802. 11 and NICs Part 3 – 802. 11 PHY Cisco Fundamentals of Wireless LANs version 1. 1 Rick Graziani Cabrillo College