Скачать презентацию Carbon sinks and biofuels Optimal greenhouse mitigation strategies Скачать презентацию Carbon sinks and biofuels Optimal greenhouse mitigation strategies

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Carbon sinks and biofuels: Optimal greenhouse mitigation strategies with inclusion of feedback effects of Carbon sinks and biofuels: Optimal greenhouse mitigation strategies with inclusion of feedback effects of the global carbon cycle. Miko U. F. Kirschbaum CSIRO Forestry and Forest Products & CRC for Greenhouse Accounting Canberra, Australia Miko. [email protected] au

Pre-industrially 280 ppm Atmosphere 280 ppm Oceans Pre-industrially 280 ppm Atmosphere 280 ppm Oceans

Pre-industrially Currently 280 ppm 370 ppm 280 ppm Pre-industrially Currently 280 ppm 370 ppm 280 ppm

Various fractions of CO 2 in the atmosphere enter into pools with different turn-over Various fractions of CO 2 in the atmosphere enter into pools with different turn-over times (shallow ocean, deep ocean, etc. ). About 18% remain permanently in the atmosphere. Based on “Bern” model as given in IPCC (2000).

Which aspect of climate change impacts us most? Instantaneous climatic conditions? • Heat damage Which aspect of climate change impacts us most? Instantaneous climatic conditions? • Heat damage • Severe weather • Tropical diseases (e. g. malaria) • Food production Rate of climate change? • Ecological mal-adaptation • Socio-economic institutions Cumulative climate change? • Sea level rise

SRES A 2 SRES A 2

Time ‘bought’ by sinks Time ‘bought’ by sinks

Time ‘bought’ by planted forests Time ‘bought’ by planted forests

Instantaneous impacts only Biofuels 20 -yr rotations; replanted after each harvest Instantaneous impacts only Biofuels 20 -yr rotations; replanted after each harvest

Biofuels and permanent sinks Biofuels and permanent sinks

50% substitution efficiency 50% substitution efficiency

Wood products with different product turn-over times Wood products with different product turn-over times

“Business-as-usual” scenario “Business-as-usual” scenario

“Business-as-usual” scenario “Business-as-usual” scenario

“Sustainable” scenario “Sustainable” scenario

Average Carbon Stock accounting Average Carbon Stock accounting

Average Carbon Stock accounting Delayed crediting Average Carbon Stock accounting Delayed crediting

Conclusions (1) • Permanent carbon storage in vegetation sinks can make a small, but Conclusions (1) • Permanent carbon storage in vegetation sinks can make a small, but useful contribution. • Temporary storage is much less valuable than permanent storage, or not valuable at all.

Conclusions (2) • The best timing of tree planting depends on the nature of Conclusions (2) • The best timing of tree planting depends on the nature of climate change impacts: Plant now if cumulative impacts are main concern; Otherwise, later planting may be better (but that also depends on growth rate).

Conclusions (3) • Biofuels can make on-going contribution (similar to permanent). • Climate-mitigation policy Conclusions (3) • Biofuels can make on-going contribution (similar to permanent). • Climate-mitigation policy needs to ensure permanent storage (not tonne-year accounting).

References: 1. 2. Kirschbaum, M. U. F. , Schlamadinger, B. , Cannell, M. G. References: 1. 2. Kirschbaum, M. U. F. , Schlamadinger, B. , Cannell, M. G. R. , Hamburg, S. P. , Karjalainen, T. , Kurz, W. A. , Prisley, S. , Schulze, E. -D. , and Singh, T. P. (2001): A generalised approach of accounting for biospheric carbon stock changes under the Kyoto Protocol. Environmental Science and Policy 4: 73 -85. Kirschbaum, M. U. F. (2003). To sink or burn? A discussion of the potential contributions of forests to greenhouse gas balances through storing carbon or providing biofuels. Biomass and Bioenergy 24: 297 -310. 3. Kirschbaum, M. U. F. (2003). Can trees buy time? An assessment of the role of vegetation sinks as part of the global carbon cycle. Climatic Change 58: 47 -71.

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