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BUSI 240 Introduction to Information Systems Tuesday & Thursday 8: 05 am – 9: BUSI 240 Introduction to Information Systems Tuesday & Thursday 8: 05 am – 9: 30 am Wyant Lecture Hall Please initial the roster on the back table. The course syllabus is available at: http: //home. apu. edu/~jbirch/BUSI 240 Or http: //online. apu. edu

Current Events – What’s going on? Obama Pushes Expanding High - Speed Wireless Service Current Events – What’s going on? Obama Pushes Expanding High - Speed Wireless Service President Barack Obama on Tuesday called for expanding highspeed wireless services to meet the voracious appetite of consumers and businesses, a task that could be tough because airwaves are a finite resource and demand is almost limitless. "Within the next five years, we will make it possible for business to deploy the next generation of high-speed wireless coverage to 98% of all Americans, " Obama said during his annual State of the Union speech to the U. S. Congress. http: //www. nytimes. com/reuters/2011/01/26/technology/tech-us-obama-speechbroadband. html? _r=1&ref=technology 3 -2

Current Events – What’s going on? Google awards $100 million to Eric Schmidt Google Current Events – What’s going on? Google awards $100 million to Eric Schmidt Google Inc. has awarded $100 million worth of equity to Eric Schmidt, who is stepping aside as CEO but will stay with the company as executive chairman. Google said in a regulatory filing on Monday the stock and stock options will be granted on Feb. 2 and will vest over four years. The magnitude of the award is "unusual" for an executive who is transitioning out of the CEO role http: //news. yahoo. com/s/ap/20110124/ap_on_hi_te/us_google_compensation; _ylt=Ajr. DTJM 1 aw 7 Geh. La. MNRq ga 2 s 0 NUE; _ylu=X 3 o. DMTFo. N 3 Bx. Yzdn. BHBvcw. Mx. Mz. AEc 2 Vj. A 2 Fj. Y 29 y. ZGlvbl 90 ZWNobm 9 sb 2 d 5 BHNsaw. Nnb 2 9 nb. GVhd 2 Fy. ZHM 3 -3

Current Events – What’s going on? Google plans biggest hiring year in company history Current Events – What’s going on? Google plans biggest hiring year in company history Google is about to go on a hiring binge. The company said Tuesday that it plans to recruit a record number of new employees in 2011, as it pushes forward with an increasingly diverse product portfolio. Google said in a blog post that it expects to exceed its 2007 hiring record, when the company added more than 6, 000 people to its ranks. Last year, Google (GOOG, Fortune 500) grew by about 4, 500 employees, which was its second-largest year for headcount growth. http: //money. cnn. com/2011/01/25/technology/google_hiring/index. htm 3 -4

Current Events – What’s going on? Google makes waves and may have solved the Current Events – What’s going on? Google makes waves and may have solved the data center conundrum Google is pondering a floating data center that could be powered and cooled by the ocean. These offshore data centers could sit 3 to 7 miles offshore and reside in about 50 to 70 meters of water. http: //blogs. zdnet. com/BTL/? p=9937 3 -5

Current Events – What’s going on? 3 -6 Current Events – What’s going on? 3 -6

Current Events – What’s going on? 3 -7 Current Events – What’s going on? 3 -7

Assignment #1 l l l 2 -8 Spreadsheet is found in the Doc Sharing Assignment #1 l l l 2 -8 Spreadsheet is found in the Doc Sharing area of http: //online. apu. edu Download the Assignment_1. doc file to your computer Instructions for completing the assignment are in the document Due February 3, 2011 – before 8: 05 am Please submit assignments in Excel 2003 format (if you have Office 2007, please “Save As”, and select 2003). All Assignments should be submitted electronically to “Dropbox” found at http: //online. apu. edu before 8: 05 am February 3 rd

Assignment #1 Assignments received after 8: 05 am will receive a 10% deduction. A Assignment #1 Assignments received after 8: 05 am will receive a 10% deduction. A 10% deduction will be levied for each day the assignment is late. l However, points are points. If you miss the deadline, turn in the assignment anyway. l Assignments can be reviewed up to 48 hours before the assignment is due (before February 1 st 8: 00 am). Please email me and I will review and return with recommendations. l 2 -9

Chapter 3 a Computer Hardware History of computers Types of computer systems Hardware components Chapter 3 a Computer Hardware History of computers Types of computer systems Hardware components and functions Computer peripherals Mc. Graw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2007 by The Mc. Graw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Calculating pre-computer l Counting on fingers and toes l Abacus: manipulating stones or beads Calculating pre-computer l Counting on fingers and toes l Abacus: manipulating stones or beads to count l The word calculate comes from calculus, the Latin word for small stone l First mechanical adding machine l Invented by Blaise Pascal in 1642 l Wheels to move counters l Machines in the age of industrialization l Mechanical 3 -11 loom with cards punched with holes

Early computing l Charles Babbage and the Analytical Engine l 19 th century l Early computing l Charles Babbage and the Analytical Engine l 19 th century l Machine that calculated, stored values in memory and perform logical comparisons l Mechanical rather than electronics l Herman Hollerith and the 1890 census l Punched cards to record census data l Cards read in a tabulating machine l Hollerith’s company went onto become IBM 3 -12

Electronic computers l ENIAC – first electronic and digital computer l 1946 l Programmable Electronic computers l ENIAC – first electronic and digital computer l 1946 l Programmable l 5000 calculations per second l Used vacuum tubes l First generation computer l Drawbacks: size and could only do one program at a time 3 -13

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Next wave of computing l Second generation, late 1950 s l Transistors replace the Next wave of computing l Second generation, late 1950 s l Transistors replace the vacuum tubes l 200, 000 to 250, 000 calculations per second l Third generation, mid 1960 s l Integrated l Fourth circuitry, miniaturization generation, 1971 l Further miniaturization of circuits l Multiprogramming and virtual storage l Fifth generation, 1980 s l Millions 3 -16 of calculations per second

Mini. Computer PDP-8 (1965) 3 -17 Mini. Computer PDP-8 (1965) 3 -17

Microcomputers l 1975, ALTAIR, flicking switches l 1977, Commodore and Radio Shack produce personal Microcomputers l 1975, ALTAIR, flicking switches l 1977, Commodore and Radio Shack produce personal computers l 1979, Apple computer, the fastest selling PC so far l 1982, IBM introduces the PC which changes the market 3 -18

TRS 80 (1979) $599 3 -19 TRS 80 (1979) $599 3 -19

IBM PC/XT (1983) 3 -20 IBM PC/XT (1983) 3 -20

Apple IIe (1983) $1, 298 3 -21 Apple IIe (1983) $1, 298 3 -21

Apple Lisa (1983) $9, 995 3 -22 Apple Lisa (1983) $9, 995 3 -22

Compaq Luggable (1985) $3, 590 3 -23 Compaq Luggable (1985) $3, 590 3 -23

Toshiba Laptop (1988) $3, 000 3 -24 Toshiba Laptop (1988) $3, 000 3 -24

Apple Newton (1993) $700 3 -25 Apple Newton (1993) $700 3 -25

Apple Laptop (1995) $3, 300 Available today on e. Bay for $19. 99 3 Apple Laptop (1995) $3, 300 Available today on e. Bay for $19. 99 3 -26

Apple Newton with i. Phone 3 -27 Apple Newton with i. Phone 3 -27

Computer System Categories 3 -28 Computer System Categories 3 -28

Microcomputer Systems l Personal Computer (PC) – microcomputer for use by an individual l Microcomputer Systems l Personal Computer (PC) – microcomputer for use by an individual l Desktop – fit on an office desk l Laptop – small, portable PC 3 -29

Recommended features for PC 3 -30 Recommended features for PC 3 -30

Microcomputer Systems l Workstation – a powerful, networked PC for business professionals l Network Microcomputer Systems l Workstation – a powerful, networked PC for business professionals l Network Server – more powerful microcomputers that coordinate telecommunications and resource sharing in small networks 3 -31

How corporate buyers choose PCs l Solid performance at a reasonable price l Operating How corporate buyers choose PCs l Solid performance at a reasonable price l Operating system ready l Connectivity – reliable network interface or wireless capability 3 -32

Terminals l Devices that allow access to a network l Dumb terminals – keyboard Terminals l Devices that allow access to a network l Dumb terminals – keyboard and video monitor with limited processing l Intelligent terminals – modified networked PCs or network computers l Network terminals or computers l Windows terminals depend on network servers for software, processing and storage l Internet terminals depend to the Internet or Intranet for operating systems and software 3 -33

Information Appliances l Hand-held microcomputer devices l Personal digital assistants (PDA) l Black. Berry Information Appliances l Hand-held microcomputer devices l Personal digital assistants (PDA) l Black. Berry l Video-game consoles l Internet enabled cellular phones 3 -34

Midrange systems l High-end network servers l Minicomputers for scientific research and industrial process Midrange systems l High-end network servers l Minicomputers for scientific research and industrial process monitoring l Less costly to buy, operate and maintain than mainframe 3 -35

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Mainframe Computer Systems l Large, fast powerful computer systems l Large primary storage capacity Mainframe Computer Systems l Large, fast powerful computer systems l Large primary storage capacity l High transaction processing l Complex computations l Can 3 -43 be used as superservers for large companies

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Supercomputer Systems l Extremely powerful systems l Scientific, engineering and business applications at extremely Supercomputer Systems l Extremely powerful systems l Scientific, engineering and business applications at extremely high speeds l Global weather forecasting, military defense l Parallel processing with thousands of microprocessors l Billions of operations per second l Millions of dollars l Minisupercomputers of dollars 3 -45 costing hundreds of thousands

Cray 2 Supercomputer 3 -46 Cray 2 Supercomputer 3 -46

IBM Supercomputer 3 -47 IBM Supercomputer 3 -47