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Beginning Chapter 6 mike perkins 46 -304 Beginning Chapter 6 mike perkins 46 -304

Review In Chapter 5 we discussed how you prepare to work with your client. Review In Chapter 5 we discussed how you prepare to work with your client. In this chapter, Chapter 6, we discuss how you begin work with the client. 2

Beginning This chapter is about your beginnings with a client. How a relationship starts Beginning This chapter is about your beginnings with a client. How a relationship starts frequently sets the tone for subsequent encounters. Successful beginning is a skill which can be learned. A poor start may be overcome but why waste the time? 3

Remember. . . You never get a second chance to make a first impression. Remember. . . You never get a second chance to make a first impression. mike perkins

Chapter 6: Beginning Topics Introducing Yourself Seeking Introductions Describing Initial Purpose Outlining Client Roles Chapter 6: Beginning Topics Introducing Yourself Seeking Introductions Describing Initial Purpose Outlining Client Roles Discussing Policy & Ethical Factors Seeking Feedback 5

The First Order of Business At the start of a first contact identify yourself The First Order of Business At the start of a first contact identify yourself by first and last name, profession, your affiliation, and status (if you are a student intern say so). It is also useful to make a brief statement as to your specialty or any particulars about the capacity in which you will be working with the client. Avoid over-familiarization during 6

Seeking Introductions A persons name is a precious thing. Learn the name of your Seeking Introductions A persons name is a precious thing. Learn the name of your client, and learn how to pronounce it correctly. Ask how the person prefers to be addressed (Miss, Ms. , Mr. , Reverend, Doctor, first name or nickname). Periodically during the course of an interview refer to your client by name. 7

How many languages do you know how to say hello in? List all of How many languages do you know how to say hello in? List all of the foreign language (non-English) words you know for ‘hello’ mike perkins

Hello: Spanning the Globe Catalan Hola Japanese Konnichiwa Chinese Ni hao Korean Aunung haseyo Hello: Spanning the Globe Catalan Hola Japanese Konnichiwa Chinese Ni hao Korean Aunung haseyo Croatian Zdravo Lithuanian Sveikas Danish Goddag Modern Greek Chairete Dutch Hallo Norwegian Hei/Hallo French Allô Persian Salam German Hallo Polish Czes'c Hebrew Shalom Portuguese Oi Hungarian Szervusz Russian Privet! Turkish Alo Serbian Zdravo Vietnamese Chao Spanish Hola Yiddish Halo Swedish Hej/Hallå Italian Ciao/Pronto Tagalog Kamusta 9

Class Role Play Exercise 1 At this point we are going to take turns Class Role Play Exercise 1 At this point we are going to take turns introducing ourselves. You are about to begin an interview with a 77 -year old widow who has a hearing impairment. She can make out most words if they are spoken clearly, distinctly, and at a low pitch. – How would you introduce yourself and seek an introduction from her? – What else, if anything would you say or do? – Discuss your rationale for the words you choose 10 and the action you propose.

Class Role Play Exercise 2 Another opportunity to introduce ourselves. You are about to Class Role Play Exercise 2 Another opportunity to introduce ourselves. You are about to begin an interview with a 22 -year old male. As you walk together to your office you smell a strong odor which resembles marijuana. – How would you introduce yourself and seek an introduction from her? – What else, if anything would you say or do? – Discuss your rationale for the words you choose and the action you propose. 11

Describing Initial Purpose Clearly and succinctly describe your vision of the purpose for the Describing Initial Purpose Clearly and succinctly describe your vision of the purpose for the meeting early in the interaction. Clearly and succinctly describe your role as well as the role of the client. Also keep in mind the goals of any social work agency, program or service you may affiliate yourself with 12

Goals of Most social work agencies, programs, and services (Garvin, 1997) Socialization Supporting “normal” Goals of Most social work agencies, programs, and services (Garvin, 1997) Socialization Supporting “normal” people in transition from one status to another Supporting people labeled or deemed Resocialization “abnormal” who display conflict with others Social Control and manage deviance Rehabilitation Support individuals attempting to become functional, healthy and socially accepted 13

Class Activity Social workers can take on many roles…list the roles that come to Class Activity Social workers can take on many roles…list the roles that come to your mind. Which roles would you like to play? mike perkins

Roles of the Professional Social Worker Social workers are engaged in many practices -in Roles of the Professional Social Worker Social workers are engaged in many practices -in many roles. Some of them are: – advocate – broker – case manager – counselor – educator – evaluator – facilitator – mediator – therapist 15

The Client Role Clients assume two basic roles – involuntary • Pressured by some The Client Role Clients assume two basic roles – involuntary • Pressured by some external source to seek services – voluntary • Seeking services of their own will and volition The dynamics for each type of role can be very different. With involuntary clients you will need to go into more depth in explaining your role and 16 function. Why is that?

INVOLUNTARY “CLIENTS” The following questions might be useful for a client who is mandated INVOLUNTARY “CLIENTS” The following questions might be useful for a client who is mandated or “referred”. . . . What do you want from coming here? What does want from you coming here? Is some of this something you want as well? When says you do not have to come anymore, what will they say you are doing differently? When says you are 'on track' what 17

The following questions might be useful for a client who is mandated or referred”. The following questions might be useful for a client who is mandated or referred”. . . . 18

Outlining the Client Role Most clients who you will see are unsure, or have Outlining the Client Role Most clients who you will see are unsure, or have misconceptions, about what it is you do and are particularly uncertain as to what is expected of them. Clients are concerned with what they are “supposed to do. ” Take time to negotiate and discuss with the client what is expected of them. 19

Sample Client Role Prescription YOUR ROLE AS CLIENT 20 Sample Client Role Prescription YOUR ROLE AS CLIENT 20

Defining Roles: A Collaborative Effort Never assume that the client knows what is expected Defining Roles: A Collaborative Effort Never assume that the client knows what is expected of them. Discuss with the client what their role is and invite them to discuss what they see their role as being. Collaborate with the client in defining their role. Do not leave the role of the client to chance. Collaboratively define what their role is and help teach them how to 21 perform it.

Policy and Ethical Considerations At the outset, before detailed discussion, you need to discuss Policy and Ethical Considerations At the outset, before detailed discussion, you need to discuss relevant legal, policy, and ethical factors. In order to educate the client you need to be well versed as to what your responsibilities are. During the preparation stages take the opportunity to become knowledgeable about any special considerations you 22 might have to your client.

Liability Social workers often incur certain legal responsibilities and liabilities in their professional roles. Liability Social workers often incur certain legal responsibilities and liabilities in their professional roles. 23

What You Can Do as A Student… Be familiar with: – The NASW Code What You Can Do as A Student… Be familiar with: – The NASW Code of Ethics and with the policies and expectations of the School of Social Work – The policies and expectations of the Social Work Program as outlined in the Field – Program Manuals, and the policies and procedures of the agencies you are placed in Purchase malpractice insurance. – Low-cost student malpractice insurance is available for students who are NASW members. – At some Canadian universities students have liability coverage while registered in the Faculty of Social Work If you are concerned about the ethics of specific agency practices or specific assignments or situations bring these concerns to a Field Instructive, Program Director or other 24 potential resource people.

Worker Ethical, Policy, and Legal Practice Guidelines Every social worker performs under various legal, Worker Ethical, Policy, and Legal Practice Guidelines Every social worker performs under various legal, ethical, and policy considerations. There is some variation from one agency to another. There is some variation from one province to another. 25

Origins of Legal, Ethical, & Policy Guidelines Legal Provincial and federal government Ethical Professional Origins of Legal, Ethical, & Policy Guidelines Legal Provincial and federal government Ethical Professional organizations Policy Agency 26

Policy practice supports social work’s purpose in facilitating social justice. Policy action emerges from Policy practice supports social work’s purpose in facilitating social justice. Policy action emerges from within social work practice” Ife, 1997 mike perkins

Policy 28 Document Available at: http: //www. casw-acts. ca/advocacy/socialpolicy_e. pdf Policy 28 Document Available at: http: //www. casw-acts. ca/advocacy/socialpolicy_e. pdf

Policy and Practice Policy Sensitive practice – Understand the wider practice context – Social Policy and Practice Policy Sensitive practice – Understand the wider practice context – Social workers recognize and observe the implications of wider systems on individuals Policy related practice – Actively engage your skills to assist specific clients. Informed by knowledge of existing policies, ensure that individuals are receiving fair implementation of existing policies. Policy Practice – When you engage in class advocacy that is, seek policy reforms that benefit a range of people 29

Policy and You KNOWLEDGE POLICY PRACTICE VALUES -Social Work values and ethics -Ethical Decision Policy and You KNOWLEDGE POLICY PRACTICE VALUES -Social Work values and ethics -Ethical Decision Making -Value and theoretical frameworks -Congruence between personal values and values underpinning policy -History of the Welfare State -Theories of the state -Institutions of Government -Policy frameworks -Stages of Policy Development -Examples of Development of different Policies -Policy language -Different policy discourses SKILLS -Policy Analysis – research conceptual, analytical -Interactional – listening, group work skills, persuasion – oral and written, networking, , negotiation, social linkage -Political –understanding and working with power, developing influence, advocacy, political action, using the media -Value Clarification – ethical decision making 30 framework, analysis

Agency Policy Items that are important to know and apprise clients of: – Billing Agency Policy Items that are important to know and apprise clients of: – Billing & payment procedures – Cancellation procedures – Who has access to records – Supervision & consultation issues – Release of information – Services the agency offers – Duration of services 31

Law and Ethics in Social Work A means of – Addressing widely defined needs Law and Ethics in Social Work A means of – Addressing widely defined needs and risks – Securing beneficial resources – Challenging the erosion of rights – Social, economic, political and cultural contexts Emphasis on the law/ethics relationship – Set legal rules alongside moral rules – How do we handle practice dilemmas? – Challenge unethical legal frameworks – Engage with international ethical codes 32

UP TO HERE FOR TUES. OCT. 23/07 33 UP TO HERE FOR TUES. OCT. 23/07 33

Are You Familiar with or Know How to Become Familiar with Canadian Law Related Are You Familiar with or Know How to Become Familiar with Canadian Law Related to… Special Populations – Children – Immigrants – Elderly – Disabled Abuse and Neglect Social Welfare Family Sexual Offenses 34

Confidentiality Consider the following principles spelled out in the NASW Code of Ethics: – Confidentiality Consider the following principles spelled out in the NASW Code of Ethics: – The social worker should apprise clients of the risks, rights, opportunities and obligations associated with social service to them. – The social worker should inform clients fully about the limits of confidentiality in a given situation, the purpose for which information is obtained, and how it may be used. 35

Limits To Confidentiality Certain limits of confidentiality are inherent in service delivery. State and Limits To Confidentiality Certain limits of confidentiality are inherent in service delivery. State and restate assurance of confidentiality to your clients, including disclaimers and exceptions, if any. Examples of exceptions include: – Federal and Provincial laws that invalidate blanket confidentiality under particular circumstances, (i. e. threats of suicide or harm to others. – Court orders that an agency or independent practitioner release certain information about a client. – Suspicion of child abuse & neglect – Harm to self 36 – Duty to warn

Words to the Wise on: Limits To Confidentiality Seek consultation before disclosing any information Words to the Wise on: Limits To Confidentiality Seek consultation before disclosing any information not covered by the client’s written release. Use discretion and only release information that is relevant to the problem at hand. 37

Class Exercise & Discussion Discussing policy & ethical issues. Divide into three groups. Each Class Exercise & Discussion Discussing policy & ethical issues. Divide into three groups. Each group will do one of the exercises found on pages 166 -169 in the text. 38

Seeking Feedback Seeking feedback is active listening with a distinct focus. You encourage the Seeking Feedback Seeking feedback is active listening with a distinct focus. You encourage the client to discuss issues related to beginning work. Those issues are: – – – Introducing Yourself Seeking Introductions Describing Initial Purpose Outlining Client Roles Discussing Policy & Ethical Factors 39

Obtaining Client Feedback What questions would you ask in order to obtain client feedback? Obtaining Client Feedback What questions would you ask in order to obtain client feedback? What kind of feedback questions, if any, would you refrain from asking a client during the first interview? 40

Obtaining Feedback Is there anything you would like to comment on about the interview? Obtaining Feedback Is there anything you would like to comment on about the interview? Was there anything that was said during the interview that was unclear or confusing for you? Do you have any questions about anything that was said during the interview? What new insights have you gained from this interview? 41

Sample Client Feedback Form 42 Sample Client Feedback Form 42

The Goals of Receiving Feedback Making sure the client is understanding what you have The Goals of Receiving Feedback Making sure the client is understanding what you have said. Making sure you understand what the client has said. Identifying and, if possible, resolving disagreements. 43

Summary During the beginning phase you: – introduce and identify yourself – seek an Summary During the beginning phase you: – introduce and identify yourself – seek an introduction from the client – describe a tentative initial purpose – identify professional roles you might assume – identify the role of the client – identify legal, policy and ethical considerations Throughout this process you are seeking feedback from the client. Write down each of the steps given above. 44

Final Class Exercise Using Exercise 6 -6 on page 170 of the text write Final Class Exercise Using Exercise 6 -6 on page 170 of the text write a script where each of those considerations is covered. You will be asked to demonstrate them in class. 45

Review In this class we discussed: – Introducing Yourself – Seeking Introductions – Describing Review In this class we discussed: – Introducing Yourself – Seeking Introductions – Describing Initial Purpose – Outlining Client Roles – Discussing Policy & Ethical Factors – Seeking Feedback These are all essential skills that you apply in the beginning work you do with a client. 46