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Before Reading 1. Word-web 2. Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding Chinese Wedding Before Reading 1. Word-web 2. Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding Chinese Wedding Anniversary Marriage Tips 3. Background Information Virginia Woolf What Are They Famous for

Word-web 新娘 bride 结婚仪式 wedding ceremony 新郎 bridegroom 结婚证 marriage license 女傧相 bridesmaid 结婚纪念日 Word-web 新娘 bride 结婚仪式 wedding ceremony 新郎 bridegroom 结婚证 marriage license 女傧相 bridesmaid 结婚纪念日 wedding anniversary 男傧相 best man 媒人 matchmaker 花轿 bridal sedan chair 私奔 elopement 婚纱 bridal veil 婚外恋 extramarital affairs 结婚戒指 wedding ring 单身汉 bachelor 喜酒 wedding banquet 离婚 divorce

Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding The white wedding — a formal affair Western Wedding vs. Chinese Wedding Western Wedding The white wedding — a formal affair with the bride dressed in white — is now the standard throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe, and its practice has spread to Asia and Africa as well. In a wedding ceremony, a priest or a government-certified official administers the ceremony in the presence of at least two witnesses. Most couples exchange some sort of marriage vows. Vows may be prescribed by the church or written by the couple. Traditional Protestant vows include the promise to love and to cherish, for better and for worse, for richer and for poorer, in sickness and in health, until parted by death. The minister asks the bride and the groom if they each make this promise to the other and each responds "I do. "

Following the wedding ceremony, many couples hold a reception. At the reception friends and Following the wedding ceremony, many couples hold a reception. At the reception friends and family gather to eat, drink, listen to music and dance, make toasts, and give gifts to the bride and groom. During the reception, the couple typically cut a special, large cake that is shared with all the guests. The bride and groom may also conduct a receiving line where they greet and thank each guest for attending their wedding. Many newlyweds take a honeymoon trip after their wedding. During the honeymoon, the couple can spend time by themselves exploring their new status as husband wife. ■ ■

Chinese Wedding 1. Traditional Chinese Wedding At dawn on the wedding day, the bride Chinese Wedding 1. Traditional Chinese Wedding At dawn on the wedding day, the bride puts on new clothes, wears a pair of red shoes and waits for the so-called "good luck woman" to dress her hair in the style of a married woman. Her head would be covered with a red silk veil. On the other hand, the bridegroom prepares himself to receive his wife. He gets capped and dressed in a long gown, red shoes and a red silk ball on his chest. Then the bridegroom sets out to receive his bride. The most interesting part of the reception really takes place at the doorstep of the bride's residence, which is heavily guarded by the bridesmaid or the bride's sisters. It is customary for the bridesmaid to give the bridegroom a difficult time before he is allowed to enter. Usually, he has to distribute among them red packets containing money — in order to take his bride home. ■

Before the bride departs to the bridegroom's home, the Before the bride departs to the bridegroom's home, the "good luck woman" will lead her to the sedan chair. The bride has to cry to show that she does not want to leave her parents. Then firecrackers will be set off to drive away evil spirits as the bride sits in the sedan chair. When the parading troop arrives at the bridegroom's, firecrackers will be set off to hail the bride's arrival. By the threshold, a flaming stove and saddle will be set up and the bride is required to sidestep or step over them to avoid evils. The wedding ceremony is the focus of interest. The bride and bridegroom are led to the family altar, where the couple kowtow to Heaven and Earth, the family ancestors and parents successively. They then bow to each other and are led to the bridal chamber. Afterwards, a grand feast is held for relatives and those who helped with the wedding. The newly wed couple will resume drinking wedding wine. Generally they are required to cross their arms to sip wine. They also will toast their guests. Guests voice their good wishes for the couple even though the bridegroom is trying to be humble while acting embarrassed.

2. Modern Chinese Wedding Directions: Watch the following pictures carefully and give a description 2. Modern Chinese Wedding Directions: Watch the following pictures carefully and give a description of a modern Chinese wedding in your own words.

Wedding Anniversary Directions: The following are the names of wedding anniversary in Chinese. You Wedding Anniversary Directions: The following are the names of wedding anniversary in Chinese. You are required to match the English names to them. 纸婚 paper wedding (1 st) 棉婚 cotton (2 nd) wedding 皮革婚 丝婚 leather (3 rd) wedding silk wedding (4 th)

铁婚 iron wedding (6 th) copper / wool wedding (7 th) 电器婚 electric appliance 铁婚 iron wedding (6 th) copper / wool wedding (7 th) 电器婚 electric appliance wedding (8 th) pottery wedding (9 th) 锡婚 tin wedding (10 th) 木婚 wood wedding (5 th) 铜 /羊 毛婚 陶器婚

瓷婚 china (20 th) wedding 红宝 石婚 金婚 珍珠婚 pearl wedding (30 th) ruby 瓷婚 china (20 th) wedding 红宝 石婚 金婚 珍珠婚 pearl wedding (30 th) ruby wedding (40 th) golden wedding (50 th) 钻石婚 diamond wedding (60 th)

Marriage Tips Directions: Here is a list of Ten Rules for a Happy Marriage Marriage Tips Directions: Here is a list of Ten Rules for a Happy Marriage from a couple who reached their 50 th anniversary and successfully made their marriage a promise for life. Listen carefully and fill in the blanks with what you hear. 1. Never both be angry at the same time. ____ __ 2. Never yell at each other unless the house is on fire. argument 3. If one of you has to win an _______, let it be your mate. 4. If you must criticize, do it ______. lovingly past 5. Never bring up mistakes of the ___. ■

Neglect 6. ______ the whole world rather than each other. unsettled 7. Never go Neglect 6. ______ the whole world rather than each other. unsettled 7. Never go to sleep with an argument _______. _____ word 8. At least once every day say a kind or complimentary to your life partner. 9. When you have done something wrong, admit it and ask forgiveness. ____ 10. Remember it takes two to make a quarrel. _____

Background Information Virginia Woolf (1882 -1941): a major British novelist, essayist, and critic — Background Information Virginia Woolf (1882 -1941): a major British novelist, essayist, and critic — was one of the leaders in the literary movement of modernism.

1. Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London. Woolf was educated 1. Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London. Woolf was educated at home by her father. "Think how I was brought up! No school; mooning about alone among my father's books; never any chance to pick up all that goes on in schools — throwing balls; ragging; slang; vulgarities; scenes; jealousies!"

2. In her works, she used a technique called 2. In her works, she used a technique called "stream of consciousness", revealing the lives of her characters by revealing their thoughts and associations. She abandoned linear narrative and used such devices as stream of consciousness and interior monologue.

3. She was also a feminist, socialist, and pacifist. She argued that a change 3. She was also a feminist, socialist, and pacifist. She argued that a change in the forms of literature was necessary because most literature had been "made by men out of their own needs for their own uses”. In her works, Woolf developed innovative literary techniques in order to reveal women's experience and find an alternative to the male-dominated views of reality.

4. As an essayist Woolf was prolific. She published some 500 essays in periodicals 4. As an essayist Woolf was prolific. She published some 500 essays in periodicals and collections, beginning 1905. Characteristic of Woolf's essays is the dialogue-based nature of her style — her reader is often directly addressed, in a conversational tone.

5. Her mother died when she was in her early teens. Stella Duckworth, her 5. Her mother died when she was in her early teens. Stella Duckworth, her half sister, took her mother's place, but died two years later. Leslie Stephen, her father, suffered a slow death from cancer. When her brother Toby died in 1906, she had a prolonged mental breakdown. After her final attack of mental illness Woolf loaded her pockets with stones and drowned herself in a river on March 28, 1941. "I have a feeling I shall go mad. I cannot go on longer in these terrible times. I hear voices and cannot concentrate on my work. I have fought against it but cannot fight any longer. I owe all my happiness to you but cannot go on and spoil your life. "

What Are They Famous for? Do you know these famous places and their stories? What Are They Famous for? Do you know these famous places and their stories? Tower of London House of Lords Piccadilly Parliament House of Commons Whitechapel Mansion House The East End

1. Tower of London: one of the oldest and most famous buildings in London, 1. Tower of London: one of the oldest and most famous buildings in London, England. It is an ancient fortress on the north bank of the river Thames to the east of the city, and is a popular tourist attraction. It was made a World Heritage Site in 1988. Tower of London

2. Piccadilly: a famous street in London's West End, between Piccadilly Circus and Hyde 2. Piccadilly: a famous street in London's West End, between Piccadilly Circus and Hyde Park Corner. Some of London's most expensive hotels, shops and clubs are on Piccadilly Circus: a famous London Landmark at the junction of five busy streets. At its heart is a bronze fountain topped by a figure of a winged archer(射手). Piccadilly

3. Parliament: It has three parts: the Royal Apartments, the House of Lords and 3. Parliament: It has three parts: the Royal Apartments, the House of Lords and the House of Commons. The House of Commons and House of Lords meet in the Palace of Westminster, located next to the River Thames in London. It has been a royal palace for nearly 1, 000 years but most of the current building dates from the middle of the Nineteenth Century when the Palace was rebuilt after a fire destroyed most of the earlier medieval buildings in 1834. Parliament

4. House of Commons: the lower house of the British Parliament, in which elected 4. House of Commons: the lower house of the British Parliament, in which elected Members of Parliament meet to discuss current political issues and vote on Acts of Parliament. House of Commons

5. House of Lords: The House of Lords considers legislation(立法), debates issues of importance 5. House of Lords: The House of Lords considers legislation(立法), debates issues of importance and provides a forum for government ministers to be questioned. The Committees of the House consider a wide range of issues and produce reports on them. The House of Lords also includes the Law Lords which is the highest court in the United Kingdom. House of Lords

6. Mansion House: As the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London, Mansion 6. Mansion House: As the official residence of the Lord Mayor of London, Mansion House has a suitably fitting neo-classical design. As well as providing the Lord Mayor with living quarters and office space, Mansion House serves as the venue for luxurious ceremonial banquets. The magnificent Egyptian Hall is most famously used for the Chancellor of the Exchequer's( 财 政 大 臣 ) annual speech to the 'great and good' of the City's financial organizations. Mansion House

7. The East End: an area to the east of the City of London, 7. The East End: an area to the east of the City of London, from the Tower of London along the north bank of the River Thames. It contains most of the old docks, where many of the local people used to work. The people living in the East End were mostly poor but well known for their friendly and lively nature. With recent new housing developments, the character of the area has completely changed. The East End

8. Whitechapel: a district in the East End of London. It has a reputation 8. Whitechapel: a district in the East End of London. It has a reputation as one of the poorest areas of central London, and one where many immigrants have settled. In the late 19 th and early 20 th centuries many Jewish people came to live in Whitechapel, and it still has many Jewish shops and businesses. Whitechapel

Global Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Questions about the Text 3. Global Reading 1. Part Division of the Text 2. Questions about the Text 3. Scanning 4. Further Understanding For Part 1 Table Completion For Part 2 Role Play For Part 3 Sequencing For Part 4 Presentation

Part Division of the Text Parts Lines 1 1~79 2 80~107 3 108~182 4 Part Division of the Text Parts Lines 1 1~79 2 80~107 3 108~182 4 183~198 Main Ideas Gilbert meets Sissy Miller and gives her the gift his wife Angela left for her. In Angela's diary Gilbert reads about how she felt, proud of him at first as a promising politician, and then a bit lonely at home. Angela' diary reveals how she went to work with the poor in the East End and developed an affection for B. M. Gilbert finally comes to realize that Angela committed suicide in order to escape from him and rejoin her lover.

Questions about the Text 1. What happened to Angela six weeks ago? When she Questions about the Text 1. What happened to Angela six weeks ago? When she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly, she was hit and killed by a car. 2. What was Gilbert's impression of Sissy Miller? What did Angela think of her? Gilbert thought Sissy Miller was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything.

3. What fantastic idea occurred to Gilbert as Sissy Miller left his house? He 3. What fantastic idea occurred to Gilbert as Sissy Miller left his house? He thought that Sissy Miller might have had entertained a passion for him although he had scarcely noticed her during all those years. 4. How did Angela and Gilbert get along when she was alive? For the first years of their marriage, they led a happy life. The couple were both proud for each other. They often went out together. Gradually, as the husband became more absorbed in work, the wife was often left alone at home. 5. What career did Gilbert pursue? What was his ambition? Gilbert was a politician. His dream was to become a great success in his career, i. e. the Prime Minister.

6. What work did Angela want to do? How did she take her work 6. What work did Angela want to do? How did she take her work in the East End? She wanted to have some work of her own. She wanted to do something to help others, especially the poor people. She took her work in the East End very seriously. 7. What kind of a man was B. M. ? B. M. was a socialist who believed in Karl Marx. He hated the existing social system. He called for revolution. He argued that people should be equal to each other. He was longing for freedom and romance. 8. Did Angela die by accident? Angela did not die by accident. She committed suicide.

Scanning Directions: In the text, the situation of “she stepped off the kerb …” Scanning Directions: In the text, the situation of “she stepped off the kerb …” occurs four times. Scan Text A and find them out. Discuss the differences each time it is mentioned. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house 1. __________________________ that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in __________________________ Piccadilly and the car had killed her. (LL. 7~9) ) ___________________ If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what 2. __________________________ she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped __________________________ straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the __________________________ inquest. She had given him no chance to pull up. (LL. 23~25) __________________________

He could see her in front of him. She was standing on the kerb He could see her in front of him. She was standing on the kerb 3. __________________________ in Piccadilly. Her eyes stared; her fists were clenched. Here __________________________ came the car… (LL. 183~185) _____________ She had stepped off the kerb to rejoin her lover. She had 4. __________________________ stepped off the kerb to escape from him. (LL. 197~198) _______________________

Further Understanding For Part 1 Table Completion Directions: After we finish reading the story, Further Understanding For Part 1 Table Completion Directions: After we finish reading the story, we realize that Mrs. Clandon was not killed by accident. In fact, she committed suicide. In the first part, there are enough clues where every word is meant to count and contribute to the development of the plot. Scan this part and find more examples. Clue 1: It was strange that Angela had made enough preparations for her death. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once Examples: ______________________ more, that she had left everything in such order…It ______________________ was as if she had foreseen her death. (LL. 5~7) ____________________

Clue 2: The relationship between Angela and Sissy Miller was peculiarly close. Examples: ______________________ Clue 2: The relationship between Angela and Sissy Miller was peculiarly close. Examples: ______________________ Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. …She was the soul of ______________________ discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her ______________________ anything, and so on. (LL. 23~25) ______________ Clue 3: Sissy Miller was in mourning for a brother who died just before Angela. Examples: She too had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a week or two before Angela. … Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. (LL. 58~61)

Clue 4: The parting comments of Sissy Miller were quite suggestive. Examples: ______________________ Clue 4: The parting comments of Sissy Miller were quite suggestive. Examples: ______________________ "Mr Clandon, " she said, looking straight at him for the first time, and for the first time he was struck by the ______________________ expression, sympathetic yet searching, in her eyes. "If ______________________ at any time, " she was saying, "there's anything I can ______________________ do to help you, remember, I shall feel it, for your wife's ______________________ sake, a pleasure? " (LL. 68~71) ________________ Clue 5: Sissy Miller shared the same initial with B. M.

For Part 2 Role play Directions: Make a dialogue between Angela and Sissy Miller. For Part 2 Role play Directions: Make a dialogue between Angela and Sissy Miller. Make sure to cover the following points: Angela 1) Describing the changed relationship between her and Gilbert. 2) Expressing her concern about the indifference in their marriage. 3) Seeking Sissy Miller’s advice. Sissy Miller 1) Condoling with Angela on this problem. 2) Gives some advice for how to maintain a happy marriage. 3) Suggests that Angela had better find a job.

For Part 3 Sequencing In Part Three, Angela’s diary revealed how she went to For Part 3 Sequencing In Part Three, Angela’s diary revealed how she went to work with the poor in the East End and developed an affection for B. M. When Mr. Clandon read through the diary of his wife, his emotions changed a lot. Find appropriate words to describe each stage and find evidence in the text to support your viewpoint. Stage One: Self-satisfied The first pages are full of praise for her new husband. He relived again the early successes of his political career. Stage Two: Relieved He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened. Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. (LL. 122~123)

Stage Three: Curious Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the Stage Three: Curious Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the initials. (LL. 124~125) Stage Four: Contempt So B. M. was a man — no doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so violent, as Angela said, and so narrowminded. Gilbert knew the type, and had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. He could also see him quite distinctly — a stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest day's work in his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through him?

Stage Five: Alarmed Could it have been his own name? …The thought added to Stage Five: Alarmed Could it have been his own name? …The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. …Why had Angela never told him? It was very unlike her to conceal anything; she had been the soul of candour. “Luckily” — why luckily? …Where had he been that night? …And B. M. and Angela had spent the evening alone! He tried to recall that evening. Was she waiting up for him when he came back? Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were the chairs drawn close together?

Stage Six: Furious It became more and more inexplicable to him — the whole Stage Six: Furious It became more and more inexplicable to him — the whole situation: his wife receiving an unknown man alone. There on the very first page was that cursed fellow again. The scoundrel had asked her to become his mistress. Alone in his room! The blood rushed to Gilbert Clandon's face. He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she told him? How could she have hesitated for an instant?

For Part 4 Presentation Work in groups, discuss the following points and then choose For Part 4 Presentation Work in groups, discuss the following points and then choose a representative to present your results to the whole class. 1. What was the story between Angela and B. M. ? 2. Why did Angela commit suicide? 3. Had Angela planned for Gilbert to meet Sissy Miller after her death? Or, in other words, is Sissy Miller a key to interpreting her legacy to Gilbert? 4. What kind of woman was Angela? 5. What is the true legacy for Gilbert? 6. What would Gilbert think afterwards?

There were gifts for all her friends. But what had his wife left behind There were gifts for all her friends. But what had his wife left behind her for him?

The Legacy Virginia Woolf The Legacy Virginia Woolf "For Sissy Miller. " Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

The Legacy Virginia Woolf The Legacy Virginia Woolf "For Sissy Miller. " Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl brooch that lay among a litter of rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

The Legacy Virginia Woolf 1. What is the part of speech of the word The Legacy Virginia Woolf 1. What is the part of speech of the word “like”? What does "For Sissy Miller. " Gilbert it mean? Clandon, taking up the pearl The word “like” is a preposition. brooch that lay among a litter of It means “in the typical manner of”. rings and brooches on a little table in his wife's drawing-room, read 2. Find the antonym of “like” in the following text. the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, It was very unlike her with my love. " to conceal anything; she had been the soul of candor. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

The Legacy Virginia Woolf Sissy Miller. The Legacy Virginia Woolf Sissy Miller. " Gilbert Paraphrase the clause. “she "Forbeen the soul of candor”. had Clandon, taking up the pearl “Soul” means “a person typifying a certain quality or idea”. of brooch that lay among a litter “Candor” means “openness and brooches on a little table rings or frankness”. The clause means she is his wife's drawing-room, read in a person who is very frank and honest. the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " She was the soul of discretion. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

The Legacy Virginia Woolf foresee: v. see (what is going to happen in the The Legacy Virginia Woolf foresee: v. see (what is going to happen in the future) in advance "For Sissy Miller. " Gilbert Clandon, taking up the pearl 我们应该在几个月前就预见到这个麻烦并且做好打算了。 brooch that lay among a litter of rings and trouble months little table We should have foreseen this brooches on aago and made provisions for it. his wife's drawing-room, read in the inscription: "For Sissy Miller, He could never have foreseen that one day his books with my love. " would sell in millions. It was like Angela to have remembered even Sissy Miller, her They foresee that deaths from AIDS will have doubled secretary. Yet how strange it was, Gilbert Clandon thought once by 2020. more, that she had left everything in such order — a little gift of some sort for every one of her friends. It was as if she had foreseen her death. Yet she had been in perfect health when she left the house that morning, six weeks ago; when she stepped off the kerb in Piccadilly and the car had killed her.

He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this token of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every friend had been left some little token of her affection. Every ring, every necklace, every little Chinese box — she had a passion for little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, bound in green leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, " he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.

He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this token of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every friend had been left some little token of her affection. Every ring, every necklace, every little Chinese box — she had a passion for little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, bound in green leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, " he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.

He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed after all felt, after all the years 1. What is the function of “he felt, her, he the years she had been with them, this token of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it with them”? was strange that Angela had It is called parenthesis( 插 入 语 ). It is a modifying orleft everything in such order. Every qualifying part inserted intohadwritten left some It is token of her affection. Every ring, friend a been sentence. little independent of the surrounding grammatical structure. every necklace, every little Chinese box — she had a passion for little boxes — had a 2. What does “this token of consideration” refer to? name on it. To him, of course, she had left nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, For one thing, it refers to the “pearl brooch” that his wife bound in it refers to the way that behind him on her writing table. Ever left for Sissy Miller. For another, green leather, stood Mr. since to come and gave her the had Clandon asked Sissy Miller they were married, she gift kept a diary. Some of their very few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about in person. that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, " he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.

He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this token of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every token: n. an outward sign; sth. that represents a fact, feeling, etc. friend had been left some little token of her affection. Every ring, It doesn't have to be aevery necklace, just a token really. big present — it's every little Chinese box — she had a passion for little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left 不需要太大的礼物,这只是意思一下。 nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, Wear this ring as a token of our love. leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever bound in green since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very Pattern: few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about that diary. When as a token of (=in token of) 作为…的标志[象征] he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, " he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.

consideration: n. the act of thinking about sth. ; thoughtful attention He was waiting consideration: n. the act of thinking about sth. ; thoughtful attention He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he to the needs or feelings of others owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this After some consideration, we've consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it token of decided to sell the house. 整个事情需要仔细考虑一下。 was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every The whole matter needs careful consideration. some little token of her affection. Every ring, friend had been left Peter never showed any consideration forevery little Chinese box — she had a passion for every necklace, anyone. little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left 彼得从来不为任何人考虑。 nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, Collocation: bound in green leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever in consideration of 考虑到;由于 since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very In consideration of her fine work, they decided to give her a raise. few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about take…into consideration 考虑到;顾及 that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut The judge took into consideration her past history before no, " he could hear her say, "After it or put her hand over it. "No, making a decision. I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was under consideration t h e o n在考虑中,在研究中 h a d n o t s h a r e d w h e n s h e w a s a l i v e. ly thing they

He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed He was waiting for Sissy Miller. He had asked her to come; he owed her, he felt, after all the years she had been with them, this token strong interest in have a passion/liking for: have a of consideration. Yes, he went on, as he sat there waiting, it was strange that Angela had left everything in such order. Every She has a passion for friend had been left some little token of her affection. Every ring, chocolate. every necklace, every little Chinese box — she had a passion for Peter has a consuming (强烈的) passion little boxes — had a name on it. To him, of course, she had left for science fiction. nothing in particular, unless it were her diary. Fifteen little volumes, 彼得非常喜好科幻小说。 bound in green leather, stood behind him on her writing table. Ever since they were married, she had kept a diary. Some of their very few — he could not call them quarrels, say tiffs — had been about that diary. When he came in and found her writing, she always shut it or put her hand over it. "No, no, " he could hear her say, "After I'm dead — perhaps. " So she had left it him, as her legacy. It was the only thing they had not shared when she was alive.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted him. "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted him. "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was 1. What is the mood of the sentence? doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the “Mood” is a set of verb forms used to indicate car speaker's at the inquest. She had given him kerb, the driver of the had said attitude toward the no chance tolikelihood of the sound of voices in the hall interrupted factuality or pull up… Here action expressed. him. Here, the subjunctive mood is used to indicate hypothetical "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. (假定的)actions. In fact it is not true. in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela She came In English the indicativebeen much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. had mood is used to make factual statements, and the himself, he mood to as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to To imperative thought, express a command. sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If 2. What is the function of only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was “if only…”? doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the It is used to express a wish that past events had been at the inquest. She had given him kerb, the driver of the car had said different. no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted 若是…那该多好啊;真希望…;只要,只要…就好。 him. "Miss 他当时要是记得买些水果来多好。 Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela If only he’d remembered to buy some fruit. had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. 假若我是乘计程车去的就好了。 To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, some fruit. If only he’d remembered to buy she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only sentence? 1. What can you infer from thisshe had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would and considerate. It implies that Angela was very thoughtful be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the She was more like a kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him friend to Sissy Miller. no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted 2. How did Mr. Clandon understand the importance of his wife to him. Sissy Miller? "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela He assumed that being employed by his wife must have been had been much Sissy Miller. Angela a very important source of income formore to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To generous and tolerant as he pushed might have been a very himself, he thought, boss. That is a chair for her and asked her to why Miss Miller was so distressed over his scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of sit down, she was wife’s death. her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be 1. What were the good qualities of Sissy Miller? alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him She was quiet, cautious, faithful, to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted no chance responsible and reliable. him. "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, 2. What does “genius” mean? she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him genius: no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted 1. a strong natural talent, aptitude, or inclination 一种很强的天 him. 赋、才能、天资 "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. He has a genius for choosing the in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela She came right words. 他有选择正确单词的天赋。 had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. 2. one who has such a talent or he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to To himself, inclination 有这样才能或天赋的 人 sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women a genius at diplomacy in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for 一个外交天才 sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one think 3. Find the word “genius” again in the following text and moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the about the implications. kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him (L. 61) Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted terribly upset. him. After we finish reading the text, we know the story between "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the we, Angela and B. M. , the brother of Sissy Miller. Therefore, maid. She to understand why terribly along with Mr. Clanton, come came in. She was Angela distressed, and no wonder. Angela had at much more to is than was TERRIBLY upset been his death. It her calledan employer. She had been a friend. To “foreshadowing”(伏笔). himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was outlive: v. live longer than doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the 据说女人比男人寿命长。 kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him It is said that women outlive to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted no chance men. He outlived his him. brother by 15 years. older "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. CF: outlive & survive 这两个都是动词,都有“比别的人或别的物存在的时间长”之意。 She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela outlive 指“活得比…长久”、“比(某物)经久”,例如: her than an employer. She had been a friend. had been much more to She outlived her son. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of 她比自己的儿子活得还长。 her kind. There were thousands of survive 指“幸存”、“比…活得长”,指在经受破坏性的生命危险之后 Sissy Millers — drab little women in black 仍存活了下来。例如: carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She Ten of them survived the shipwreck. was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her 他们中只有十人在船难中幸存。 anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she pull up: (cause to) come to a stop had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the A car pulled up outside my house. kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him 汽车停了,司机跳出来了。 chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted no The car pulled up and the driver jumped out. him. CF: pull, draw, drag & haul "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. 这四个词都是动词,都有“拉”、“拖”、“拽”之意。 was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela She came in. She pull 为通用词,常伴有状语表示拖的方向。例如: to her than an employer. She had been a friend. had been much more To himself, miles out to as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to A small fishing-boat was carriedhe thought, sea by a sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of powerful fish as it pulled on the line. her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women 一条小渔船被一条力气强大的鱼拖着鱼线带向数英里以外的海上去了。 in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was draw 通常表示“向前方拖”,或“向施加力的人或物的方向拖或拉”,并且 doing, she would 包含着“比较轻易地或平滑地运动”。例如: be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him If a train entered this tunnel, it would draw in fresh air behind it. no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted 如果火车开进这条隧道,它会抽进新鲜空气。 him. "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. drag 的含义是“慢慢地而沉重地拽”,而且包含着被拖者进行着积极的或消 极的抵抗或阻力。例如: She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. When he had killed the guard, the prisoner of war quickly To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to dragged him into the sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of bushes. her kind. There 战俘杀死卫兵后,很快把他拖进矮树丛中。 were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was haul 表示“强有力地拖或拉”,在美国英语中表示“运输”,这个词总表示 doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the “以机械或有关 具进行拖拉”。例如: kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him They had little difficulty in finding it. But hauling it out of the no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted water proved to be a serious problem. him. 东西不难找到,但是把它拖出水面却是个严重的问题。 "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela Collocation: had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. 使克服困难;渡过难关 pull through To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to sit down, (火车)进站,到站,停站 she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of pull in her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women 拆毁;推毁;推翻 pull down in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was distress: doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the 1. v. cause great suffering to the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him kerb, The idea of her son being in danger distressed her the sound of voices in the hall interrupted no chance to pull up… Here enormously. him. I hope I haven't distressed you with all these personal "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. questions. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela 2. n. a state of extreme sorrow, suffering, or pain had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. She claimed that the way she had been treated at work had a chair for her and asked her to To himself, he thought, as he pushed caused her extreme emotional distress. scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of sit down, she was Jealousy causes distress and. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women her kind. painful emotions. 嫉妒使人痛苦不安。 in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If sympathy: n. the feeling only she had stopped one for the or expression of pity or sorrow moment, and had thought what she was pain or distress of somebody else doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the kerb, for driver of the car had said I don't have much sympathy theher — I think she's brought theat the inquest. She had given him troubles on herself. no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted him. 总统致函安慰已故战士的亲属。 "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. The president has sent a message of sympathy was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela She came in. She to the relatives of the dead soldiers. had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to Collocation : sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of (对…表示)慰问 express sympathy for her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women 同情 in sympathy within black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for 慰问 discovered all sorts of qualities in Sissy Miller. She sympathy, had 信 a letter of sympathy was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If But he had always taken it for granted that she would outlive him. If only discretion: n. good judgment she had stopped one moment, and had thought what she was doing, she would be alive now. But she had stepped straight off the The granting of visas is at the discretion of the immigration kerb, the driver of the car had said at the inquest. She had given him officials. no chance to pull up… Here the sound of voices in the hall interrupted I leave the arrangements to your discretion. him. "Miss Miller, Sir, " said the maid. Discretion is the better part of valor. She came in. She was terribly distressed, and no wonder. Angela [谚]谨慎为勇敢之本; 好汉不吃眼前亏。 had been much more to her than an employer. She had been a friend. To himself, he thought, as he pushed a chair for her and asked her to Collocation : sit down, she was scarcely distinguishable from any other woman of 随某人的意思, 叫某人自行处理 at the discretion of sb. her kind. There were thousands of Sissy Millers — drab little women 慎重地, 审慎地 with discretion in black carrying attaché cases. But Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had 是非的)懂事年龄 , 负责 年龄of qualities in Sissy Miller. She (能辨别善恶 discovered all sorts age of discretion was the soul of discretion, so silent, so trustworthy, one could tell her anything, and so on.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He could guess what his wife had meant to her. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He could guess what his wife had meant to her. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. 1. What does “lot” mean? "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. The original meaning of He murmured. objects in makingunderstood. It was only natural. He “lot” is the use of Of course he could guess what his a determination or choice at random(抽签). wife had meant to her. "I've that so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested Here it means fate, somethingbeenbefalls one because of or on the writing as if because of determination by lot. table behind him. It was here they had worked — she and Angela. For Angela had her 由于或似乎由于命运的决定而发生于某人身上的事;命运,运气 share of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to My lot is a hard one. him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table 我的命运坎坷。 — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes 2. Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes 2. What was the job of Mr. Clandon? Could you describe how with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. prominent he is? "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. Mr. Clandon was a politician. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He He had stood for Parliament and toured his constituency(选 could guess what his wife had meant to her. 区). (LL. 88~89) "I've House happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested He sometimes dined at thebeen soof Commons or the on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she Mansion House. (L. 94 & L. 159) and minor For in the government. He had been given a. Angela. post Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to (LL. 101~102) However, from the him inthat “A minor He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table lines his career. post only, but her — Sissy at now that he will taking down letters from her dictation. No comment was: "I am quite certainthe typewriter, be Prime doubt Miss Miller was thinking have Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her speculate his what might been so. He paused here tothe broochupon wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been but the have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; better to have left her a sum of money. Or even at typewriter. But there it was game wasn't over yet. Notthefifty. ”(LL. 102~106), it is sound — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, not made a big success in his to conclude that he hadtaking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had career. He was not prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it. really “prominent”.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He could guess what his wife had meant to her. 3. Translate the sentence into Chinese. so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested "I've been on the writing table behind him. It 因为安吉拉肩负着政要夫人应该承担的各种责任,在他的政治生涯中她 was here they had worked — she 给了他极大的帮助。 and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. 1. What can you infer from the sentence? He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He could guess what his wife to making Since Mr. Clandon was a politician, he was used had meant to her. "I've been so was good at she speeches on various occasions. He happy here, " usingsaid, looking round. Her eyes rested beautiful words though he might not table mean it. He was, was here they had worked — she on the writing really behind him. It to some extent, hypocritical(伪善的). Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of and Angela. For the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. fall to: be the duty of He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He It falls to me (= It is my duty) to thank you for all you have could guess what his wife had meant to her. done for the association. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested 安排新进度表的 作就落在了约翰身上。 table behind him. It was here they had worked — she on the writing The job of arranging andnew schedule fell to John. her share of the duties that fall to the lot of the Angela. For Angela had the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to Collocation: him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table 破坏;倒塌 — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No fall apart doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to 失败未能达到预想;在成就上落后 fall down give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it 被欺骗 fall for seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or 变 少;降低 fall off even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " 偶遇;遭遇 fall on/upon And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He prominent: adj. well-known or important could guess what his wife had meant to her. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested Einstein was the most prominent scientist of the 20 th century. on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she and be playing a Angela had her share The government should. Angela. For more prominent role in of the duties that fall to the lot of the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to promoting human rights. him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss said) take down: write or record (what is. Miller could not speak at Miss said) take down: write or record (what is. Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her phone handkerchief. he'd He took down my address andpocket number and said. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. phone back. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He The secretary took down the various points and then prepared could guess what his wife had meant to her. a written report. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested Collocation: on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she 在相貌、脾气或性格上相似 take after and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of 拆开,分开,将…分成许多部分 take apart the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to 收回(所说 的或所写的事) take back him in把…视 作 his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table take for — Sissy ;理解;欺骗 接纳 at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No take in doubt脱掉(衣服等);放开;打折 of that, too. Now all he had to do was to Miss Miller was thinking take off give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it 从事;雇佣 take on seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or 取出 take out even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " 接管, 获 得对 …的控制或管理 take over And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had 再次开始,重新开始;用尽,耗掉或占 take up prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it. 用;喜欢 ,钟爱 ;开始从事

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, no doubt: almost certainly; very probably Mr Clandon, " she said. He murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He We will, no doubt, discuss these issues again at the next could guess what his wife had meant to her. meeting. "I've been so happy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested No doubt he means onhelp, but in fact he just gets inhim. way. to the writing table behind the It was here they had worked — she and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of 毫无疑问他是想帮忙,但实际上他却起了妨碍作用。 the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to Collocation: him in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table [常作插入语] 毫无疑问 beyond doubt — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to 无疑地 without (a) doubt give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it 对 …产 生怀 疑, 使人对 …产 生怀 to cast/throw doubt on seemed. It might have been better疑 have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with Miss Miller could not speak at first. She sat there dabbing her eyes with her pocket handkerchief. Then she made an effort. "Pardon me, Mr Clandon, " she said. He out of place incongruous: adj. inappropriate; murmured. Of course he understood. It was only natural. He could guess what his wife had meant to her. It seems incongruous to have woman ashappy here, " she said, looking round. Her eyes rested "I've been so the editor of a men's magazine. on the writing table behind him. It was here they had worked — she and Angela. For Angela had her share of the duties that fall to the lot of 那座现代化的高楼大厦在那古老的村庄里看上去不协调。 the wife of a prominent politician, she had been the greatest help to The modern huge building looks incongruous in that oldhim in his career. He had often seen her and Sissy sitting at that table fashioned village. — Sissy at the typewriter, taking down letters from her dictation. No doubt Miss Miller was thinking of that, too. Now all he had to do was to give her the brooch his wife had left her. A rather incongruous gift it seemed. It might have been better to have left her a sum of money. Or even the typewriter. But there it was — "For Sissy Miller, with my love. " And, taking the brooch, he gave it her with the little speech that he had prepared. He knew, he said, that she would value it.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little black coat and skirt that seemed the uniform of her profession. Then he remembered — she was in mourning, of course. She too had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a week or two before Angela. In some accident, was it? He could remember only Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. She was putting on her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to intrude. But he could not let her go without saying something about her future. And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little black coat and skirt that seemed the uniform of her profession. Then he remembered — she was in mourning, of course. She too had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a week or two before Angela. In some accident, was it? He could remember only Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. She was putting on her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to intrude. But he could not let her go without saying something about her future. And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little in mourning: wearing black clothes toand skirt that seemed the uniform of her profession. Then black coat show grief at the death of sb. he remembered The whole nation was in mourning for — she was in mourning, of course. She too had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a those who died in the war. week or two before Angela. In some accident, was it? He could He was in deep mourning for his father. Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for remember only sympathy, had been terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. She was putting on her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to intrude. But he could not let her go without saying something about her future. And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl What does the sentence imply? brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little It seemed like a coincidence that Angela and the brother of black coat and skirt that seemed the uniform of her profession. Then Sissy Miller died one remembered —In fact these mourning, of course. She too had he after the other. she was in two incidents were directly interrelated. a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a her tragedy — week or two before Angela. In some accident, was it? He could remember only Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. She was putting on her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to intrude. But he could not let her go without saying something about her future. And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little tragedy: n. a terrible, unhappy, or unfortunate event black coat and skirt that seemed the uniform of her profession. Then Hitler's ambition to conquer the world led to the was in mourning, of course. She too had he remembered — she tragedy of the Second World War. tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a her week or two before 他们住的旅馆着了火, 他们的假日就以不幸而告终。 Angela. In some accident, was it? He could remember only Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for Their holiday endedsympathy, had their terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. in tragedy when been hotel caught fire. She was putting on her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to intrude. But he could Shakespeare's tragedies include "Hamlet", not let her go without saying something about her future. "King Lear" and "Othello". And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as His wife had often worn it…And she replied, as she took it, almost as if she too had prepared a speech, that it would always be a treasured possession…She had, he supposed, other clothes upon which a pearl brooch would not look quite so incongruous. She was wearing the little intrude: v. put (oneself) black situation where one is unwelcome; uniform of her profession. Then into a coat and skirt that seemed the enter unwanted or unasked (followed by on/into/upon) he remembered — she was in mourning, of course. She too had her tragedy — a brother, to whom she was devoted, had died only a Newspaper editors are urged not to intrude on/into the week or two before Angela. In some accident, was it? He could grief of the families of missing servicemen. remember only Angela telling him; Angela, with her genius for sympathy, had been terribly upset. Meanwhile Sissy Miller had risen. The press has been blamed for intruding into people's personal lives in an unacceptable way. her gloves. Evidently she felt that she ought not to She was putting on intrude. But he could not let her go without saying something about her future. And so he added, as he pressed her hand. "Remember, Miss Miller, if there's any way in which I can help you, it will be a pleasure. . . " Then he opened the door. For a moment, on the threshold, as if a sudden thought had struck her, she stopped.

"Mr. Clandon, " she said, looking straight at him for the first time, and for the first time he was struck by the expression, sympathetic yet searching, in her eyes. "If at any time, " she was saying, "there's anything I can do to help you, remember, I shall feel it, for your wife's sake, a pleasure…" With that she was gone. Her words and the look that went with them were unexpected. It was almost as if she believed, or hoped, that he would have need of her. A curious, perhaps a fantastic idea occurred to him as he returned to his chair. Could it be, that during all those years when he had scarcely noticed her, she, as the novelists say, had entertained a passion for him? He caught his own reflection in the glass as he passed. He was over fifty; but he could not help admitting that he was still, as the looking-glass showed him, a very distinguished-looking man.

"Mr. Clandon, " she said, looking straight at him for the first time, and for the first time he was struck by the expression, sympathetic yet searching, in her eyes. "If at any time, " she was saying, "there's anything I can do to help 1. What do you learn from Sissy Miller’s eyes? you, remember, I shall feel it, for your The expression in wife's sake, a pleasure…. " searching. her eyes was sympathetic yet When Sissy Miller looked With that she felt very sorry words and the look that went with at Mr. Clandon, was gone. Her for she shared the samewere unexpected. dearest almost as if she believed, or hoped, that them feeling of losing a It was family member. Meanwhile, although she had known the cause of he would have need of her. A curious, perhaps a fantastic idea Angela’s death, she was not sure whether Mr. Clandonto his chair. Could it be, that during all occurred to him as he returned had also got to know it. those years when he had scarcely noticed her, she, as the novelists say, had entertained a passion for him? He caught his own reflection in the glass as he passed. He was over fifty; but he could not help admitting that he was still, as the looking-glass showed him, a very distinguished-looking man.

"Mr. Clandon, " she said, looking straight at him for the first time, and for the first time he was struck by the 2. What was the reaction of Mr. Clandon? expression, sympathetic yet searching, in her eyes. Miller any time, " liked Mr. Clandon thought that Sissy "If at might have hadshe was saying, "there's that he was still very him for a long time. He believed anything I can do to help you, remember, I shall feel it, for your attractive to women. wife's sake, a pleasure…. " 3. Translate the sentence into Chinese. With that she was gone. Her words and the look that went with 目光第一次直视着他,他第一次为她的眼神暗暗吃惊,既流露出同情又 as if she believed, or hoped, that them were unexpected. It was almost 十分锐利。 he would have need of her. A curious, perhaps a fantastic idea occurred to him as he returned to his chair. Could it be, that during all those years when he had scarcely noticed her, she, as the novelists say, had entertained a passion for him? He caught his own reflection in the glass as he passed. He was over fifty; but he could not help admitting that he was still, as the looking-glass showed him, a very distinguished-looking man.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was as if she had answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, you're very attractive to women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out somewhere he had looked at her across the table and said to himself. She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. That first year he had been standing for Parliament. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was as if she had answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, you're very attractive to women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out somewhere he had looked at her across the table and said to himself. She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. That first year he had been standing for Parliament. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

1. What was the attitude of Angela toward his husband? said, half laughing. How 1. What was the attitude of Angela toward his husband? said, half laughing. How he would have "Poor Sissy Miller!" he She was very proud of her husband. She had every He turned instinctively to her diary. liked to share that joke with his wife! confidence in his ability to succeed. She admired or even "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was adored him. as if she had answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, 2. Find more examples in the text toattractive to understanding. you're very support your women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud “Gilbert looked so wonderful…”(LL. 81~82) I am to be his wife!" And he had always been “How proud I am to very proud(LL. 84~85) be his wife!” to be her husband. How often when they dined out “I am quite certainsomewhere he had looked Minister!” now that he will be Prime at her across the table and said to himself. (LL. 102~103) She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. That first year he had been standing for Parliament. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. at random: in a random"Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was way; aimlessly as if she had answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, She picked up a magazine and started you're very attractive to women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He reading at random. read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been The lottery numbers very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out are chosen at random. somewhere he had looked at her across the table and said to himself. She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. Collocation: That first year he had been standing for Parliament. 胡乱射击 a random shot They had随意取样 his constituency. "When Gilbert toured a random sample sat down随机过 程 the applause was terrific. The whole random process audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " CF: random, haphazard & casual he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was 这三个词都是形容词,都有“偶然的”、“无目的的”之意。 question. Of course, she seemed to say, as if she had answered his random 强调某事不是按计划发生的,或者某事的发生不是有确当的 course Sissy Miller felt that too. He you're very attractive to women. Of 思维活动所促成的 read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been a random answer very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out 胡乱的回答(强调回答问题的人的脑子没有支配的能力) her across the table and said to himself. somewhere he had looked at She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. a random collection of books That first year he had been standing for Parliament. 毫无目的收集的书籍 They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at haphazard 用于表示说话或使用某物时不考虑效果,不考虑是否会 random, "looked so wonderful…" It was 造成不良的后果 if she had answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, as haphazard remarks you're very attractive to women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud I 随口说出的话(强调不考虑是否有可能造成不良后果) am to be his wife!" And he had always been very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out a haphazard policy somewhere he had looked at her across the table and said to himself. 胡乱制定的政策 She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. casual 可以表示“随便的” That first year he had been standing for Parliament. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert a casual remark sat down the applause was terrific. The whole 强调说话人漫不经心的偶然性 audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was Fill in the blanks with the words above. answered his question. Of course, she seemed to say, as if she had you're satisfactory because he has Of 1. The experiment cannot be very attractive to women. to course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been random use a ______ selection of specimens. very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out haphazard 2. He regretted his _____ remarks. looked at her across the table and said to himself. somewhere he had She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. 3. The Danes had the self-confidence of conquerors, and That first year he had been standing for Parliament. casual their security precautions were ______. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

"Poor Sissy Miller!" he said, half laughing. How he would have liked to share that joke with his wife! He turned instinctively to her diary. "Gilbert, " he read, opening it at random, "looked so wonderful…" It was applause: n. the noise made she had answeredclapping their Of course, she seemed to say, as if by a group of people his question. hands to show approval you're very attractive to women. Of course Sissy Miller felt that too. He read on. "How proud I am to be his wife!" And he had always been His speech met with great applause. very proud to be her husband. How often when they dined out So let's have a round of applause, please, for a very lovely somewhere he had looked at her across the table and said to himself. and talented young lady who is going to sing for us. She is the loveliest woman here! He read on. That first year he had been standing for Parliament. They had toured his constituency. "When Gilbert sat down the applause was terrific. The whole audience rose and sang: "For he's a jolly good fellow. " I was quite overcome. " He remembered that, too. She had been sitting on the platform beside him. He could still see the glance she cast at him, and how she had tears in her eyes.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume from the writing table — he had become more and more absorbed in his work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much regretted that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume from the writing table — he had become more and more absorbed in his work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much regretted that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as 1. Paraphrase the first sentence. Gilbert's wife? " had no children. She Angela had regretted that they had Then as the years passed — he took another volume from the about it. was full of shame and sorrowwriting table — he had become more and more absorbed in his work. And she, having a child? 2. What was the husband’s attitude towardof course, was more often alone. It had been a great grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one The husband did not have need for it. entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much 3. Why were the husband wife that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year regretted divided in opinion on this issue? After they had got married for a few years, the husband he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, became more and more absorbed in his work and the wife was more often leftbut her comment was: sheam quite certain now that he will be Prime alone at home. Naturally, "I hoped to Minister!" Well, the husband, gone differently, it might have been so. He have a baby to accompany her whileif things had so busy and occupied in hispaused herefeel like it. work, did not to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as fragment: 1. n. a small broken-off. Gilbert's wife? " Thenpart the years passed — he took another volume or incomplete piece or as from the writing table — he had become more and more absorbed in his The road was covered with fragments of glass from the work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great shattered window. grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one entry read, "that unpublished novel Scholars are piecing together last. Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much from fragments ofregretted discovered manuscript. been so full, so rich as it was. That year a recently that himself. Life had he had 她把碗掉在地上,碗破成碎片。 been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime She dropped the bowl on the floor andifitthings into fragments. Minister!" Well, broke had gone differently, it might have been so. He paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the 2. v. break into fragments Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume The satellite will fragment the writing tablefallshe had become more and more absorbed in his from and burn up as it — through the Earth's atmosphere. work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great After the election, the coalition fragmented. grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much 选举之后,联盟瓦解了。 regretted that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as grief: n. great sorrow or feeling of suffering Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume Newspapers shouldfrom the writing table private had become more and more absorbed in his not intrude on people's — he grief. work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great Friendships multiplygrief and divide griefs. joys to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much 友谊增进欢乐, 分担忧愁。 regretted that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy speculate: v. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy speculate: v. think or talk about a matter without having the of Commons… To an evening party at fragments. "Dined at the House necessary facts; make guesses I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as the Lovegroves. Did I don't know why she did it — I'm just speculating. Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume 我一直在思索我的未来。 from the writing table — he had become more and more absorbed in his work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great I've been speculating on my future. grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one Pattern: speculate about/on entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" Oddly enough he had never much regretted that himself. Life had will Journalists are speculating about whether interest rates been so full, so rich as it was. That year be cut. he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, A spokesperson declined to speculate on was: "I am the but her comment the cause of quite certain now that he will be Prime train crash. Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He speculate that paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a The newspapers have speculated that they will get married gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast next year. his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, speculate + whhappy, daily trifles that had The readers can speculate what will happen next. made up her life.

He took up another volume and opened it at random. He took up another volume and opened it at random. "What a coward I am! I let the chance slip again. But it seemed selfish to bother him about my own affairs, when he has so much to think about. And we so seldom have an evening alone. " What was the meaning of that? Oh here was the explanation — it referred to her work in the East End. "I plucked up courage and talked to Gilbert at last. He was so kind, so good. He made no objection. " He remembered that conversation. She had told him that she felt so idle, so useless. She wished to have some work of her own. She wanted to do something — she had blushed so prettily, he remembered, as she said it sitting in that very chair — to help others. So every Wednesday she went to Whitechapel. He remembered how he hated the clothes she wore on those occasions. But she had taken it very seriously it seemed. The diary was full of references like this: "Saw Mrs. Jones… She has ten children. . . Husband lost his arm in an accident… Did my best to find a job for Lily. " He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened.

He took up another volume and opened it at random. He took up another volume and opened it at random. "What a coward I am! I let the chance slip again. But it seemed selfish to bother him about my own affairs, when he has so much to think about. And we so seldom have an evening alone. " What was the meaning of that? Oh here was the explanation — it referred to her work in the East End. "I plucked up courage and talked to Gilbert at last. He was so kind, so good. He made no objection. " He remembered that conversation. She had told him that she felt so idle, so useless. She wished to have some work of her own. She wanted to do something — she had blushed so prettily, he remembered, as she said it sitting in that very chair — to help others. So every Wednesday she went to Whitechapel. He remembered how he hated the clothes she wore on those occasions. But she had taken it very seriously it seemed. The diary was full of references like this: "Saw Mrs. Jones… She has ten children. . . Husband lost his arm in an accident… Did my best to find a job for Lily. " He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened.

He took up another volume and opened it at random. He took up another volume and opened it at random. "What a pluck: v. pull the feathers off; pickam! I let the chance slip again. But it seemed selfish to bother coward I She looked relaxedhim about thereown affairs, chicken. has so much to think about. And we as she sat my plucking the when he so seldom have an evening alone. " What was the meaning of that? Oh He plucked an apple from the branch above his head. here was the explanation — it referred to her work in the East End. "I Pattern: plucked up courage and talked to Gilbert at last. He was so kind, so pluck up (one's) courage He made noin spite of fear. He remembered that conversation. She good. show bravery objection. " He finally plucked up couragehim that shemarryso idle, so useless. She wished to have some had told to ask her to felt him. I'd love to do a parachute of her own. , She. I can't work jump (跳伞) but wanted to do something — she had blushed so pluck up enough courage. prettily, he remembered, as she said it sitting in that very chair — to Collocation: help others. So every Wednesday she went to Whitechapel. He 扯去, 撕去 pluck away remembered how he hated the clothes she wore on those occasions. 拆毁(建筑物等);(把某人)拖下来, 使丢脸 pluck down But she had taken it very seriously it seemed. The diary was full of 从…摘下; 拔下; 撕下; 降级 pluck off references like this: "Saw Mrs. Jones… She has ten children. . . Husband lost his arm in an accident… Did my best to find a job for Lily. " He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened.

He took up another volume and opened it at random. He took up another volume and opened it at random. "What a coward I am! I let the chance slip again. But it seemed selfish to bother him about my own affairs, when he has so much to think about. And we blush: v. become red in the face from shame evening alone. " What was the meaning of that? Oh so seldom have an here of what explanation — it referred to her work in the East End. "I He blushed at the thoughtwas thehe'd done. plucked up courage and talked to Gilbert at last. He was so kind, so 小女孩在生人面前羞得脸都红了。 made no objection. " He remembered that conversation. She good. He had told him that she felt so idle, so useless. She wished to have some The little girl blushed with of her before She wanted to do something — she had blushed so work shame own. the stranger. prettily, he remembered, as she said it sitting in that very chair — to help others. So every Wednesday she went to Whitechapel. He remembered how he hated the clothes she wore on those occasions. But she had taken it very seriously it seemed. The diary was full of references like this: "Saw Mrs. Jones… She has ten children. . . Husband lost his arm in an accident… Did my best to find a job for Lily. " He skipped on. His own name occurred less frequently. His interest slackened.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the initials; some woman, he supposed, that she had met on one of her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper classes… I walked back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental picture. B. M. , it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen who air their views in ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here he was again.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the initials; some woman, he supposed, that she had met on one of her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper classes… I walked back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental picture. B. M. , it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen who air their views in ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here he was again.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could 1. What does “that note of exclamation” mean? not a in the initials; some Chinese ”Note” means a sign of fill particular emotion. Thewoman, he supposed, that she had met on one of her equivalent is “口气;语调;声调”. committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper There is a note of anxiety in her voice. back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to classes… I walked 她的口气有点焦急。 convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no “Exclamation” is an doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so interjection(感叹词). Here, “that note of exclamation” refers to the line in Angela’s violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to diary: "He shook hands with Minnie!" come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands 2. Paraphrase the sentence. with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental When Mr. Clandon read the line in Angela’s diary, his picture. B. M. , it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken impression of B. M. became even worse. hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen 3. Translate the sentence into Chinese. who air their views in ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and 这句话的惊叹语气使他对此人的印象更糟了。this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here had no liking for he was again.

He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. He read on rapidly, filling in scene after scene from her scrappy fragments. "Dined at the House of Commons… To an evening party at the Lovegroves. Did I realize my responsibility, Lady L. asked me, as fill in: put in (whatever is needed) to complete sth. Gilbert's wife? " Then as the years passed — he took another volume All passengers were required to fill in the health forms before from the writing table — he had become more and more absorbed in his boarding. work. And she, of course, was more often alone. It had been a great 请在这份表格上填上你的姓名、年龄和地址。 grief to her, apparently, that they had no children. "How I wish, " one Please fill in this form, giving your name, age, and address. Oddly enough he had never much entry read, "that Gilbert had a son!" regretted that himself. Life had been so full, so rich as it was. That year We'll have to find someone to fill in for Francis tonight as he's ill. he had been given a minor post in the government. A minor post only, but her comment 弗朗西斯病了,我们得找个什么人今晚顶替他。 was: "I am quite certain now that he will be Prime Minister!" Well, if things had gone differently, it might have been so. He Collocation: paused here to speculate upon what might have been. Politics was a 装满;填满 fill up gamble, he reflected; but the game wasn't over yet. Not at fifty. He cast 充满着 be filled with his eyes rapidly over more pages, full of the little trifles, the insignificant, happy, daily trifles that had made up her life.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the initials; some woman, he supposed, that she had met on initial: one 1. n. the first letter of a nameof her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper classes… I walked back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to Your initials are the first letters of your first convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no and last name. doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so He wrote his initials Z. Y. at the bottom of the page. violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to 2. adj. having to do withcome and seethe beginning or occurring at her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands My initial reaction to with Minnie!" Thatrefuse. of exclamation gave another twist to his mental his invitation was to note picture. B. M. , it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken 最初的会谈是后来达成协议的基础。 hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen The initial talks werewhobasetheir views agreement. drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and the air of the later in ladies' had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here he was again.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could committee: n. a group of people chosen to do a some woman, he supposed, that she had met on not fill in the initials; particular job or for special duties one of her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper The local council has just set up a committee to study recycling. classes… I walked back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to She sits on the school's development But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no convince him. committee. doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so Collocation: violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to 学术委员会 scholarship committee come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands 常务委员会 standing committee with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental school administration committee 校务 委员 会 picture. B. M. , 班委会 it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken class committee hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen 教育委员 会 educational committee 技术 委员 ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and technical committeewho air their views in会 监 this 会 watch-dog committee no liking for督委员particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here had World Heritage Committee again. 世界遗产 委员 会 he was

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could not fill in the initials; some woman, he supposed, that she had met on NB: committee 为集合名词,其后面的动词既可为单数也可用复数(主要 one of her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper 看它是指一个集体还是指许多个人而定), 例如: classes… I walked back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to The committee meets at four today. convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no 委员会今天四点开会。 doubt one of those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so The committee getviolent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to together with difficulty. come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands 委员们开会很难召集齐。 with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental picture. B. M. , it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen who air their views in ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here he was again.

Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: Some of the entries conveyed nothing to him. For example: "Had a heated argument about socialism with B. M. " Who was B. M. ? He could air one's view: make one's view known to people not fill in the initials; some woman, he supposed, that she had met on Every Friday there is aof her committees. "B. M. made a violent attack upon the upper one meeting in the department where the students can air their views and walked problems. classes… I discuss back after the meeting with B. M. and tried to 公民有权公开发表自己的言论。 convince him. But he is so narrow-minded. " So B. M. was a man — no Citizens have the right to air theirof those "intellectuals" as they call themselves, who are so doubt one views fully. violent, as Angela said, and so narrow-minded. She had invited him to Collocation: come and see her apparently. "B. M. came to dinner. He shook hands 公开发表意见 air one's views with Minnie!" That note of exclamation gave another twist to his mental 极端的[过激的]观点 extreme views picture. B. M. , 和某人意见 一致 it seemed, wasn't used to parlour-maids: he had shaken fall in with sb. 's views 依照个人的见 解 in one's view hands with Minnie. Presumably he was one of those tame workingmen 初看, 一见 (就) at first view who air their views in ladies' drawing-rooms. Gilbert knew the type, and 出现 在眼前, 可以被看得见 come into view had no liking for this particular specimen, whoever B. M. might be. Here he was again.

"Went with B. M. to the Tower of London… He said revolution is bound to come…He said we live in a Fool's paradise. " That was just the kind of thing B. M. would say — Gilbert could hear him. He could also see him quite distinctly — a stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest day's work in his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through him? He read on. "B. M. said some very disagreeable things about. . . " The name was carefully scratched out. "I would not listen to any more abuse of. . . " Again the name was obliterated. Could it have been his own name? Was that why Angela covered the page so quickly when he came in? The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. He had the impertinence to discuss him in this very room. Why had Angela never told him? It was very unlike her to conceal anything;

"Went with B. M. to the Tower of London… He said revolution is bound to come…He said we live in a Fool's paradise. " That was just the kind of thing B. M. would say — Gilbert could hear him. He could also see him quite distinctly — a stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest day's work in his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through him? He read on. "B. M. said some very disagreeable things about. . . " The name was carefully scratched out. "I would not listen to any more abuse of. . . " Again the name was obliterated. Could it have been his own name? Was that why Angela covered the page so quickly when he came in? The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. He had the impertinence to discuss him in this very room. Why had Angela never told him? It was very unlike her to conceal anything;

"Went with B. M. to the Tower of London… He scratch: v. mark or cut with a rough or sharp instrument; come…He said we said revolution is bound to scrape with claws orlive input. Fool's paradise. " That was just the kind nails; a or remove by doing this They often scratched their initials on stones insay buildings of thing B. M. would the — Gilbert could hear they worked on. him. He could also see him quite distinctly — a 他们经常在他们 作过的楼房石头上刻上他们名字的首字母。 stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, 他开始用刀子把墙上的油漆刮下来。 dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest He began to scratchday's work the his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through the paint off in door with a knife. him? He read on. "B. M. said some very disagreeable things about. . " The branches tore at my jacket and scratched my hands The name was carefully scratched out. "I would not listen to any more and face. abuse of. . . " Again the name was obliterated. Could it have been his Collocation: own name? Was that why Angela covered the page so quickly when 划掉, 勾去 scratch out he came in? The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. He had 竭力搜寻, 到处挖掘 scratch about had the impertinence to discuss him in this very room. Why had 凑合着过 日子 scratch along scratch for oneself Angela never关心自己的利益It was very unlike her to conceal anything; told him?

"Went with B. M. to the Tower of London… He dislike: said revolution is bound to come…He said we 1. n. the feeling of hating or nota Fool's paradise. " That was just the kind live in liking sth. or sb. He has a dislike for cold air. B. M. would say — Gilbert could hear of thing They have a mutual him. He each other. see him quite distinctly — a dislike of could also stubby little man, with a rough beard, red tie, Collocation: dressed as they always did in tweeds, who had never done an honest 厌恶, 不喜欢 have a dislike for/of/to day's work in厌恶;开始讨厌 his life. Surely Angela had the sense to see through take a dislike to on. "B. M. likes and dislikes him? He read爱 好和厌恶 said some very disagreeable things about. . " The name was carefully scratched out. "I would not listen to any more 2. vt. not like abuse of. . . " Again the name was obliterated. Could it have been his I dislike the idea of testingname? Was that why Angela covered the page so quickly when own children in such a rigid way. he came in? The thought added to his growing dislike of B. M. He had 她很不喜欢别人对她这样说话。 had the impertinence to discuss him in this very room. Why had She strongly disliked being spoken to like that. Angela never told him? It was very unlike her to conceal anything;

she had been the soul of candour. He turned the pages, picking out every she had been the soul of candour. He turned the pages, picking out every reference to B. M. "B. M. told me the story of his childhood. His mother went out charring… When I think of it, I can hardly bear to go on living in such luxury… Three guineas for one hat!" If only she had discussed the matter with him, instead of puzzling her poor little head about questions that were much too difficult for her to understand! He had lent her books. Karl Marx. "The Coming Revolution. " The initials B. M. , recurred repeatedly. But why never the full name? He read on. "B. M. came unexpectedly after dinner. Luckily, I was alone. " That was only a year ago. "Luckily" — why luckily? — "I was alone. " Where had he been that night? He checked the date in his engagement book. It had been the night of the Mansion House dinner. And B. M. and Angela had spent the evening alone! He tried to recall that evening. Was she waiting up for him when he came back?

she had been the soul of candour. He turned the pages, picking out every she had been the soul of candour. He turned the pages, picking out every reference to B. M. "B. M. told me the story of his childhood. His mother went out charring… When I think of it, I can hardly bear to go on living in such luxury… Three guineas for one hat!" If only she had discussed the matter with him, instead of puzzling her poor little head about questions that were much too difficult for her to understand! He had lent her books. Karl Marx. "The Coming Revolution. " The initials B. M. , recurred repeatedly. But why never the full name? He read on. "B. M. came unexpectedly after dinner. Luckily, I was alone. " That was only a year ago. "Luckily" — why luckily? — "I was alone. " Where had he been that night? He checked the date in his engagement book. It had been the night of the Mansion House dinner. And B. M. and Angela had spent the evening alone! He tried to recall that evening. Was she waiting up for him when he came back?

Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were the chairs drawn close together? He could remember nothing — nothing whatever. It became more and more inexplicable to him — the whole situation: his wife receiving an unknown man alone. Perhaps the next volume would explain. Hastily he reached for the last of the diaries — the one she had left unfinished when she died. There on the very first page was that cursed fellow again. "Dined alone with B. M… He became very agitated. He said it was time we understood each other… I tried to make him listen. But he would not. He threatened that if I did not…" the rest of the page was scored over. He could not make out a single word; but there could be only one interpretation: the scoundrel had asked her to become his mistress. Alone in his room! The blood rushed to Gilbert Clandon's face. He turned the pages rapidly. What had been her answer? Initials had ceased. It was simply "he" now. "He came again. I told him I could not come to any decision… I implored him to leave me. "

Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were the chairs drawn close together? He could remember nothing — nothing whatever. It became more and more inexplicable to him — the whole situation: his wife receiving an unknown man alone. Perhaps the next volume would explain. Hastily he reached for the last of the diaries — the one she had left unfinished when she died. There on the very first page was that cursed fellow again. "Dined alone with B. M… He became very agitated. He said it was time we understood each other… I tried to make him listen. But he would not. He threatened that if I did not…" the rest of the page was scored over. He could not make out a single word; but there could be only one interpretation: the scoundrel had asked her to become his mistress. Alone in his room! The blood rushed to Gilbert Clandon's face. He turned the pages rapidly. What had been her answer? Initials had ceased. It was simply "he" now. "He came again. I told him I could not come to any decision…. I implored him to leave me. "

Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were Had the room looked just as usual? Were there glasses on the table? Were the chairs drawn close together? He could remember nothing cease: — nothing whatever. It became more and more inexplicable to him — 1. v. stop the whole situation: his wife receiving an unknown man alone. Pattern: Perhaps the next volume would explain. Hastily he reached for the cease to do sth. The law will cease to last of the diaries — the one she had left unfinished when she died. be valid from midnight tonight. There on the very first page was that cursed fellow again. "Dined cease doing sth. alone with B. M…. He became very agitated. He said it was time we We must cease dumping waste in the sea. understood each other…. I tried to make him listen. But he would not. 2. n. cessation; pause ( He threatenedwithout ) did not…" the rest of the page was scored over. often used with that if I He could not make out a single word; but there could be only one They worked on without cease. interpretation: the scoundrel had asked her to become his mistress. 我们不停地生产以便按时完成计划。 his room! The blood rushed to Gilbert Clandon's face. He Alone in turned the pages rapidly. on time. We worked without cease to get the project finished. What had been her answer? Initials had ceased. It was simply "he" now. "He came again. I told him I could not come to any decision…. I implored him to leave me. "

He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she told him? How could she have hesitated for an instant? Then: "I wrote him a letter. " Then pages were left blank. Then there was this: "No answer to my letter. " Then more blank pages: and then this: "He has done what he threatened. " After that — what came after that? He turned page after page. All were blank. But there, on the very day before her death, was this entry: "Have I the courage to do it too? " That was the end. Gilbert Clandon let the book slide to the floor. He could see her in front of him. She was standing on the kerb in Piccadilly. Her eyes stared; her fists were clenched. Here came the car… He could not bear it. He must know the truth. He strode to the telephone. "Miss Miller!" There was silence. Then he heard someone moving in the room.

He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she told him? How could she have hesitated for an instant? Then: "I wrote him a letter. " Then pages were left blank. Then there was this: "No answer to my letter. " Then more blank pages: and then this: "He has done what he threatened. " After that — what came after that? He turned page after page. All were blank. But there, on the very day before her death, was this entry: "Have I the courage to do it too? " That was the end. Gilbert Clandon let the book slide to the floor. He could see her in front of him. She was standing on the kerb in Piccadilly. Her eyes stared; her fists were clenched. Here came the car… He could not bear it. He must know the truth. He strode to the telephone. "Miss Miller!" There was silence. Then he heard someone moving in the room.

He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she He had forced himself upon her in this very house? But why hadn't she told him? How could she have hesitated for an instant? Then: "I stride: wrote him a letter. " Then pages were left blank. Then there was this: 1. v. walk with long steps "No answer to my letter. " Then more blank pages: and then this: "He Phil strode towards Stan and shook his hand. has done what he threatened. " After that — what came after that? He 他怒气冲冲地跨进教室。 turned page after page. All were blank. But there, on the very day before her death, was this entry: "Have I the courage to do it too? " He strode angrily into the classroom. That was the end. Gilbert Clandon let the book slide to the floor. 2. n. a long step He could see her in front of him. She was She attributed her record-breaking speed to the length of standing on the kerb in Piccadilly. Her eyes her stride. stared; her fists were clenched. Here came the 他两大步就穿过了房间。 car…. With two strides he crossed the room. bear it. He must know the truth. He could not He strode to the telephone. "Miss Miller!" There was silence. Then he heard someone moving in the room.

"Sissy Miller speaking" — her voice at last answered him. "Who, " he thundered, "is B. M. ? " He could hear the cheap clock ticking on her mantelpiece: then a long drawn sigh. Then at last she said: "He was my brother. " He was her brother; her brother who had killed himself. "Is there, " he heard Sissy Miller asking, "anything that I can explain? " "Nothing!" he cried. "Nothing!" He had received his legacy. She had told him the truth. She had stepped off the kerb to rejoin her lover. She had stepped off the kerb to escape from him.

"Sissy Miller speaking" — her voice at last answered him. "Who, " he thundered, "is B. M. ? " He could hear the cheap clock ticking on her mantelpiece: then a long drawn sigh. Then at last she said: "He was my brother. " He was her brother; her brother who had killed himself. "Is there, " he heard Sissy Miller asking, "anything that I can explain? " "Nothing!" he cried. "Nothing!" He had received his legacy. She had told him the truth. She had stepped off the kerb to rejoin her lover. She had stepped off the kerb to escape from him.

"Sissy Miller speaking" — her voice at last answered him. "Who, " he thundered, "is B. M. ? " thunder: 1. v. shout loudly; produce thunder He could hear the cheap clock ticking on her mantelpiece: then a Lily thundered at her long drawn sigh. Then atlate. she said: boyfriend for being an hour last The reformers thundered "He was my brother. " against drinking and gambling. He was her brother; her brother who had killed himself. 社会改革者大声疾呼, 反对酗酒和赌博。 "Is there, " he heard Sissy Miller asking, "anything that I can 2. n. the loud explosive noise following a flash of lightning explain? " My daughter is afraid of thunder and lightning. "Nothing!" he cried. He had received his legacy. She had told him the truth. She had stepped off Collocation: the kerb向…大发雷霆, her lover. She had to rejoin 大声斥责; 大声恐吓 thunder against stepped 吓得目瞪口呆, 如遭晴天霹雳 from him. off the kerb to escape struck with thunder What/Why/Where in thunder. . . ? 究竟…? 到底…?

After Reading 1. Useful Expressions 2. Picture Description 3. Debate 4. Compound Dictation 5. After Reading 1. Useful Expressions 2. Picture Description 3. Debate 4. Compound Dictation 5. Writing Practice – How to Write a Report Introduction Writing Strategy An Example Criteria for a Good Report Homework 6. Talk about the Pictures 7. Proverbs and Quotations

Useful Expressions 1. 表示关心的方式 token of consideration 2. 情有独钟 have a passion for/entertain a Useful Expressions 1. 表示关心的方式 token of consideration 2. 情有独钟 have a passion for/entertain a passion for/have a liking for 3. 措手不及 no chance to pull up 4. 几乎没有什么区别 be scarcely distinguishable from 5. 天生会同情人 with one’s genius for sympathy 6. 十分谨慎 be the soul of discretion 7. 政要 a prominent politician 8. 某人应该承担的责任 the duties that fall to the lot of sb.

9. 珍爱之物 a treasured possession 10. 职业制服 the uniform of one’s profession 11. 穿着丧服 9. 珍爱之物 a treasured possession 10. 职业制服 the uniform of one’s profession 11. 穿着丧服 be in mourning 12. 在门口 on the threshold 13. 需要某人 have need of sb. 14. 一个仪表堂堂的人 a distinguished-looking man 15. 信手翻开来 open sth. at random 16. 竞选议员 stand for Parliament

17. 思忖着 speculate upon sth. 18. 却用自己的事去打搅他 bother sb. about one’s own affairs 19. 17. 思忖着 speculate upon sth. 18. 却用自己的事去打搅他 bother sb. about one’s own affairs 19. 鼓起勇气 pluck up courage 20. 一点也不反对 make no objection 21. 觉得莫名其妙 convey nothing to sb. 22. 对…大加抨击 make a violent attack upon 23. 发表自己的看法 air one’s view 24. 有头脑看穿这种人 have the sense to see through sb. 25. 做不了决定 come to no decision 26. 迫…就范 force oneself upon sb.

Picture Description You'll have three pictures showing three different ways to celebrate one’s marriage. Picture Description You'll have three pictures showing three different ways to celebrate one’s marriage. Form a group of three students. Each of you is required to give a brief description of each type and then compare three ways. group wedding ceremony traditional wedding ceremony Honeymoon

Useful sentences and expressions mass wedding ceremony; couples; Olympic Stadium; exchange rings; make one’s Useful sentences and expressions mass wedding ceremony; couples; Olympic Stadium; exchange rings; make one’s wedding; be broadcast by satellite and Internet; bride; bridal veil; bridegroom; white scarf; pledge to never divorce nor use violence against family members

Useful sentences and expressions church; clergyman; The bridegroom kisses the bride. ; family heads Useful sentences and expressions church; clergyman; The bridegroom kisses the bride. ; family heads of both sides; close friends and colleagues; propose a toast

Useful sentences and expressions go abroad; lie on the beach; enjoy a sunbath; swim Useful sentences and expressions go abroad; lie on the beach; enjoy a sunbath; swim in the blue sea; blue sky; sails; relax one’s self; surf; beautiful natural scenery; in the distance; sea gulls; palms; widen one’s horizon

Debate Directions: Now all of you have some ideas of the various ways to Debate Directions: Now all of you have some ideas of the various ways to celebrate one’s marriage. You are required to discuss this topic further and see if you can agree on which is the best way to celebrate one’s marriage. Tips Sample

Advantages of and reasons for a group wedding 1. Only once in one’s life Advantages of and reasons for a group wedding 1. Only once in one’s life 2. Great significance 3. Romantic and exciting Advantages of and reasons for holding a simple wedding dinner 1. Save money and energy 2. Meaningful 3. Lay a good foundation for the future Advantages of spending one’s honeymoon abroad 1. Enjoy the natural scenery 2. Relax one’s mind 3. Avoid being interfered with 4. Gain more knowledge 5. Widen one’s horizon

A: OK, as we all know, nowadays we have various ways to celebrate a A: OK, as we all know, nowadays we have various ways to celebrate a marriage. Some people spend their honeymoon by traveling abroad. Others like to hold a luxurious wedding feast. And still others just invite some of their relatives and close friends to have a simple wedding ceremony. Personally I prefer the last way. There are three reasons. First of all, my parents are not rich and cannot afford a luxurious wedding ceremony. Holding a simple wedding ceremony will not cost us much money. Besides, we will not waste our energy preparing for the ceremony. What is more, because of the simple wedding ceremony, we needn’t borrow money from others. Thus, it will lay a good foundation for our future life.

B: I’m sorry. I don’t quite agree with you. From my point of view, B: I’m sorry. I don’t quite agree with you. From my point of view, marriage is only once in my life. I will try my best to let it be of great significance. The mass wedding is what I have wished. Just imagine more than 40, 000 couples exchanging wedding vows at the same time. How romantic and interesting it is! I do believe every couple at that wedding ceremony will never forget their experience. Of course, if I can have this kind of mass wedding together with some of my close friends and their spouses, it will become more significant.

C: My view on the best way to celebrate marriage is different from both C: My view on the best way to celebrate marriage is different from both of yours. As you can see, I’m fond of a quiet and peaceful life. Usually, I go to school by myself, do homework by myself and even do shopping by myself. Of course, that doesn’t mean I’m a cold man. Just the opposite, I often speak the most in class and take an active part in social activities such as the Englishspeaking competition, the karaoke competition and other competitions. Therefore, when I have a chance to choose a way to celebrate my marriage, my choice will be traveling abroad. You know, by visiting some famous spots of interest, we can enjoy the natural scenery. We can lie on some famous beaches and swim in the sea nearby. Or we can visit Niagara Falls in the USA. By so doing, we can relax our mind and forget the busy life for some time. In addition, we can widen our horizons and gain more knowledge about the world in which we live. All in all, I would like to spend my honeymoon in this way.

Compound Dictation Directions: Listen to a short passage entitled “Marriage Arranged or Not? ” Compound Dictation Directions: Listen to a short passage entitled “Marriage Arranged or Not? ” and fill in the blanks. Most Americans find the idea of arranged marriages difficult to understand or accept. They believe that two people should marry dating for love, after a period of _____or courtship (求爱时期). During that prospective period, the ____ marriage partners are supposed to learn enough about each other to decide whether or not they will be able build to ____ a successful marriage. Today in America, it is common for preparing people to live together as a way of _______ for marriage. The idea old-fashioned of an arranged marriage seems very _____ indeed. ■

But ____ all marriages arranged in one way or another? In the aren't _____ But ____ all marriages arranged in one way or another? In the aren't _____ United States marriages are seldom formally arranged, but quite a lot of informal arranging goes on before two people become People who get married are introduced to each husband wife. _________________ other by friends. These friends have already decided that the two ______ people are right for each other and arrange for them to meet. In the _______ United States, this kind of arrangement is very common. Because friends have such great influence, their approval of a dating partner ________________________ is very important. ______

Families also exert (施加) open and subtle pressures on their children to influence their Families also exert (施加) open and subtle pressures on their children to influence their choices of marriage partners. Parents often arrange dates for their own children. One parent often tells a friend about her beautiful daughter or handsome son. Also, parents can meet the perfect marriage prospect for their son or daughter through business relationships. _____________ Since parents often assist their children financially, they feel that they have the right to help the _________________________ bride and groom select where they will live, what type of furniture _________________________ they will purchase, and what their life-style will be like. ___________________

Writing Practice – How to Write a Report Introduction Book reports can help learners Writing Practice – How to Write a Report Introduction Book reports can help learners improve their reading comprehension and enhance their ability to analyze the story and the characters. Generally speaking, a book report is usually composed of three major parts. They are: ● information about the writer (his name, the books he has published, the years of his birth and death, the publisher of the book) ● a summary of the book (the story and main characters) ● some comments on the book (personal interpretation of the meaning of the book)

Writing Strategy As mentioned above, a report is generally made up of three parts. Writing Strategy As mentioned above, a report is generally made up of three parts. When giving the information about the writer, the learner writer should include some historical and social background to which the book is related. To make things clear, the learner writer should read some reference materials, such as biographies of the writer and histories of the period in which the book was written. A book report should contain a summary of the book under discussion. The summary should be concise, clear and easy to understand. The learner writer should make sure that the summary be subjective and center on the major theme of the book. As for the tense of the book report, it depends on the subject matter of the book. If it is a novel or a play or a science fiction, the present tense is more appropriate while the past tense is required for nonfiction such as history books.

The third part and also the most important part of a book report is The third part and also the most important part of a book report is the comment. In this part, the learner writer's job is to evaluate the book according to his or her own personal interpretation and discuss the merits and demerits of the book, the social and/or historical significance of the book. If the learner writer is competent enough to discuss the writing style of the author, he or she should feel free to do so.

An Example A Report on Sons and Lovers is a novel written by David An Example A Report on Sons and Lovers is a novel written by David Herbert Lawrence and it was first published in 1913 in London by Wyman & Sons. D. H. Lawrence was born at Eastwood, Notts, on September 11, 1885, the fourth child of a miner who had been employed at Brinsley Colliery since he was seven years old. In 1911, his first novel The White Peacock was published. In the first part, the writer identifies the author and the title of the work. Also, the writer gives a general description of the author of the book.

Sons and Lovers is divided into two parts and is composed of 15 chapters Sons and Lovers is divided into two parts and is composed of 15 chapters altogether. The story, set in England, can be interpreted as an autobiographical novel of Lawrence. The hero of the book, Paul Morel, is the second son of a miner's family. His mother, Mrs. Morel, is a daughter of a middle-class family. Because of the differences in family background and education, a shadow is soon cast upon the married life of Mrs. Morel. And this shadow is darkened by Mr. Morel's laziness and alcoholism. By misfortune or bad luck, Mr. Morel has an accident and becomes a cripple, which changes him into a man of bad temper. As a result, the couple shares less and less things in common and is driven farther and farther apart from each other. Little by little, Mrs. Morel transports her attention and love to her children, especially her two sons, William and Paul. She encourages them to leave the small mining region for a big city to find opportunities for a better life. After the death of her first son, William, because of hard work and pneumonia, Mrs. Morel's divided attention

and love is poured completely upon Paul. The mother's abnormal love robs Paul of and love is poured completely upon Paul. The mother's abnormal love robs Paul of his normal love for his girl friend. Sons and Lovers has always been claimed since its publication to be another version of the Oedipus complex. But D. H. Lawrence is in no sense an imitator. Sons and Lovers is truly an autobiographical novel. It describes an ordinary life of a coal miner's family. The abnormal love from the mother deprives Paul of his independent personality and mental health. It is perhaps because of this true picture of life that the novel has won Lawrence an everlasting reputation. This part focuses on the writer's personal reactions to the work. In this example, the second paragraph of the report present a summary of all important aspects of the original work. The succeeding paragraph records the writer’s reaction to it, with references to the original material.

Criteria for a Good Report 1) Does the summary part convey to the reader Criteria for a Good Report 1) Does the summary part convey to the reader a general sense of all key aspects of the original work? 2) Are direct quotations from the work appropriately used to illustrate important ideas? 3) Does the second part focus on the writer's personal reactions to the work? 4) Does the writer close the report with a short concluding paragraph?

Homework Based on the discussion, write a report of about 250 words on The Homework Based on the discussion, write a report of about 250 words on The Legacy. Sample report

A Report on The Legacy At the beginning of the story, Gilbert Clandon was A Report on The Legacy At the beginning of the story, Gilbert Clandon was surrounded by gifts left by his wife, Angela, killed recently by a car. He is waiting for his wife's secretary, Sissy Miller to give her the brooch his wife had set aside for her. As Sissy is about to leave, she assures him that if there is anything she can do, she would feel it a pleasure. Her parting comment leaves Clandon puzzled. Could it be that Sissy Miller had romantic designs on him? He laughs and turns to his wife's diary. The first pages are full of praise for her new husband he basks in self-satisfaction as he reads. As time passes he becomes more absorbed in his work. They spend less time together. She speaks of her longing for the child that never comes. Time heavy on her hands, she takes up charity work. Then his own name begins to appear less frequently and that of another, a "B. M. " receives increasing mention. B. M. is a workingman, something of a socialist. A bond of affection develops. Clandon

reads on with increasing alarm and indignation. Eventually B. M. asks Angela to leave reads on with increasing alarm and indignation. Eventually B. M. asks Angela to leave Clandon. When she holds back, he kills himself. The final entry in the diary is short and simple: "Have I the courage to do it too? " At last Clandon realizes that his wife committed suicide. But who was B. M. He hastens to ring Sissy Miller. And the answer is: "He was my brother. " There were clues enough in this perfectly crafted short story in which every word is meant to count and contribute to the plot. They are woven into the plot by the deft hand of such a master of her art as Woolf. (286 words)

Talk about the Pictures Talk about the Pictures

Proverbs and Quotations 1. One should have both eyes open before marriage, and one Proverbs and Quotations 1. One should have both eyes open before marriage, and one eye shut after marriage. 婚前应该睁大眼睛,婚后则应睁一只眼闭一只眼。 2. Sometimes, love isn’t enough. 生活中只有爱情是不够的。 3. It takes two to tango. 夫妻之间需要互相理解和配合。

4. Husbands and wives are not audience, but participant observers in each other’s lives. 4. Husbands and wives are not audience, but participant observers in each other’s lives. This law of lasting love instructs us to look with instead of for love. — Gorge Gordon Byron, British poet 夫妻并非彼此生活的观众,而是参与对方生活的观察者。持久爱情的这一法则 教导我们用充满爱意的眼神去看自己的伴侣,而不是用寻找爱的眼神去看。 —— 英国诗人 G. G. 拜伦 5. All happy families are like one another, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. 6. — Leo Tolstoy, Russian writer 所有幸福的家庭都十分相似;而每个不幸的家庭各有各的不幸。 —— 俄国文学家 L. 托尔斯泰