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ANNUAL CONFERENCE Rocky Hill Marriott March 27 -28, 2008 TOPICS: 1. 2. 3. 4. ANNUAL CONFERENCE Rocky Hill Marriott March 27 -28, 2008 TOPICS: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. CIAC Mission Statement CIAC Membership Classes 2008 - 2009 CIAC 2006 -2007 Sports Participation CAS-CIAC Financial Status / Auditor’s Report / Sport Audit CIAC Endowment Fund / Corporate Sponsorships NCAA Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics National Federation Sports Participation Survey for 2007 CIAC Staff Division of Responsibility Tournament Packet Schedule for 2008 -2009 Soccer - Yellow and Red Card Totals Coaching Regulations CIAC By-law Changes Spring Football Reorganization of CIAC Board of Control Broadcasting CIAC Athletic Events Other Topics of Importance / Interest Thought for the 2008 CAAD Conference: “You can’t solve problems with the same kind of thinking that got you into them. ” A. Einstein

1. CIAC MISSION STATEMENT AND 2007 -2008 GOALS CIAC MISSION STATEMENT The CIAC believes 1. CIAC MISSION STATEMENT AND 2007 -2008 GOALS CIAC MISSION STATEMENT The CIAC believes that interscholastic athletic programs and competition are an integral part of a student’s academic, social, emotional and physical development. The CIAC promotes the academic mission of schools and honorable competition. As such, the CIAC serves as the regulatory agency for high school interscholastic athletic programs and exists to assure quality experiences that reflect high ethical standards and expectations for fairness, equity and sportsmanship for all student athletes and coaches. The CIAC provides leadership and support for member schools through the voluntary services of dedicated school administrators, athletic directors, coaches and consultants.

2. CIAC Membership Classes 2008 – 2009 CIAC MEMBERSHIP CLASSES 2008 -09 AND 2009 2. CIAC Membership Classes 2008 – 2009 CIAC MEMBERSHIP CLASSES 2008 -09 AND 2009 -10

3. CIAC 2006 -07 SPORTS PARTICIPATION CIAC 2006 -07 Sports Participation Male 58, 809 3. CIAC 2006 -07 SPORTS PARTICIPATION CIAC 2006 -07 Sports Participation Male 58, 809 By Grade -- 12 11 10 9 Boys Teams Sport Total Boys Teams Boys Girls Total Baseball 173 6000 1 6001 Basketball 177 5095 2 5097 Cross Country 169 3477 12 3489 Field Hockey Not sponsored Football 141 10250 7 10257 Golf 165 1957 51 2008 Gymnastics Not sponsored Ice Hockey 69 1734 7 1741 Lacrosse 79 4049 4 4053 Soccer 175 6992 42 7034 Softball Not sponsored Swimming 104 1874 349 2223 Tennis 143 2483 73 2556 Track (Indoor) 143 4365 1 2556 Track (Outdoor) 170 6857 14 6871 Volleyball 43 774 2 776 Wrestling 130 2902 73 2975 Total 1881 58809 683 59447 Total 103, 676 11, 719 14, 492 15, 572 17, 026 Athletes Entered Female 44, 867 7, 795 10, 221 12, 937 13, 914 19, 514 24, 713 28, 509 30, 940 Girls Teams Total Girls Teams Girls 178 165 79 53 77 72 154 175 102 145 140 168 153 1661 Total Boys Total Not sponsored 4155 0 2660 0 3340 0 Not sponsored 419 0 442 0 Not sponsored 3057 0 5669 0 4586 0 2474 0 2881 0 4151 0 6276 0 4119 0 Not sponsored 44229 Overall 0 4155 2660 3340 419 442 3057 5669 4586 2474 2881 4151 6276 4119 44229 Total Teams Total Boys Total Girls 173 355 334 79 141 218 77 69 151 329 175 206 288 283 338 196 130 6000 5095 3477 0 10250 1957 0 1734 4049 6992 0 1874 2483 4365 6857 774 2902 1 4157 2672 3340 7 470 442 7 3061 5711 4586 2823 2954 4152 6290 4121 73 3542 58809 Total 6001 9252 6149 3340 10257 2427 442 1741 7110 12703 4586 4697 5437 8517 13147 4895 2975 44867 103676

2006 -07 Athletic Participation Percentages By School 2006 -07 Athletic Participation Percentages By School

4. CAS-CIAC FINANCIAL STATUS AND AUDITOR’S REPORT June 30, 2006 Assets $1, 375, 565. 4. CAS-CIAC FINANCIAL STATUS AND AUDITOR’S REPORT June 30, 2006 Assets $1, 375, 565. 00 Liabilities 27, 080. 00 Balance of Funds 1, 348, 485. 00 Increase in Balance of Funds from Previous Year 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 $ 89, 633. 00 30, 230. 00 159, 062. 00 124, 083. 00 105, 632. 00 CAS-CIAC Operating Budget 2004 -2005 -2006 -2007 -2008 $2, 835, 400. 00 (Actual) 3, 213, 047. 00 (Actual) 3, 315, 480. 00 (Actual) 3, 495, 944. 00 (Estimated)

4. CIAC SPORTS AUDIT AND FIVE YEAR ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES Attached for your reference 4. CIAC SPORTS AUDIT AND FIVE YEAR ANALYSIS OF EXPENSES Attached for your reference is the 2006 -07 audited sports report and a five year analysis of income and expenses. Although the report indicates an overall positive outcome for the 2006 -07 year with plus $65, 572 in income versus expenses you will note that expenses exceeded the overall budget by minus ($78, 184). These figures represent actual against budget numbers. If it were not for the exceptional year we had in boys’ basketball CIAC sports could have easily been in the red. The staff is very concerned with the steady rise in expenses to operate our tournaments. The five year analysis shows expenses have increased, on average, by over 52% since 2001. The increase in some individual sports such as ice hockey, boys lacrosse, girls swimming, and boys/girls outdoor track have been staggering. It is clear to staff that every effort will need to be made by all sports committees to contain and/or reduce costs. Revenues have increased over the past five years, however; this has been the direct result of increases in ticket prices, increased entry fees and increased event attendance. We do not anticipate any substantial increase in revenue from any of these sources as we move forward. The 2008 -09 CAS-CIAC budget has been constructed with no increase in ticket prices included. The Board will need to provide appropriate direction to all sports committees relative to expenses as we will not be able to continue business as usual and remain solvent. Expense / Athlete / All sports $ 7. 58

5. CIAC ENDOWMENT / CORPORATE SPONSORS Endowment Account Net Revenue as of 2/27/06 Net 5. CIAC ENDOWMENT / CORPORATE SPONSORS Endowment Account Net Revenue as of 2/27/06 Net Revenue as of 2/28/07 Net Revenue as of 2/29/08 $660, 767. 00 636, 455. 00 Change in Use of Endowment Funds CIAC Minutes January 18, 2007 Michael Savage discussed issues and questions related to the Athletic Program Review initiative. The cost of program review is approximately $3, 000 per school. If we are to meet the goal of all schools to be participants in this review over a period of ten (10) years, then we should plan on conducting 18 such reviews per year, at a total annual cost of $54, 000 -$60, 000. CIAC Minutes February 15, 2007 CIAC Athletic Program Funding Proposal – Mr. Savage presented a proposal to the Board that Foundation monies be used to fund the athletic program review costs. Foundation funding of this program will occur in lieu of the current annual rebate program which provides approximately $500 to our member schools. The program review process also includes technical support and staff time provided through the CAS-CIAC office. Motion (Steve Wysowski) – second (Rich Cavallaro) – motion approved.

6. NCAA ESTIMATED PROBABILITY OF COMPETING IN ATHLETICS Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics 6. NCAA ESTIMATED PROBABILITY OF COMPETING IN ATHLETICS Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level Student. Athletes Men’s Basketball Women’s Basketball Football Baseball High School Student-Athletes 549, 500 456, 900 983, 600 455, 300 29, 900 321, 400 High School Senior Student-Athletes 157, 000 130, 500 281, 000 130, 100 8, 500 91, 800 NCAA Student-Athletes 15, 700 14, 400 56, 500 25, 700 3, 700 18, 200 NCAA Freshman Roster Positions 4, 500 4, 100 16, 200 7, 300 1, 100 5, 200 3, 500 3, 200 12, 600 5, 700 800 4, 100 Student-Athletes Drafted 44 32 250 600 33 76 Percent High School to NCAA 2. 9 3. 1 5. 8 5. 6 12. 9 5. 7 Percent NCAA to Professional 1. 3 1. 0 2. 0 10. 5 4. 1 1. 9 0. 03 0. 02 0. 09 0. 5 0. 08 NCAA Senior Student-Athletes NCAA Percent High School to Professional • Men’s Ice Hockey Men’s Soccer Note: These percentages are based on estimated data and should be considered approximations of the actual percentages.

7. NATIONAL FEDERATION SPORTS PARTICIPATION SURVEY FOR 2007 Ten Most Popular Boys Programs Schools 7. NATIONAL FEDERATION SPORTS PARTICIPATION SURVEY FOR 2007 Ten Most Popular Boys Programs Schools 1. Basketball 2. Track & Field -- Outdoor 3. Baseball 4. Football -- 11 Player 5. Golf 6. Cross Country 7. Soccer 8. Wrestling 9. Tennis 10. Swimming & Diving 17, 762 15, 709 15, 458 13, 922 13, 541 13, 354 11, 066 9, 445 9, 438 6, 358 Participants Football -- 11 Player Basketball Track & Field – Outdoor Baseball Soccer Wrestling Cross Country Golf Tennis Swimming & Diving 1, 104, 548 556, 269 544, 180 477, 430 377, 999 257, 246 216, 085 159, 747 156, 944 106, 738 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Ten Most Popular Girls Programs 17, 458 1. Basketball 15, 578 2. Track & Field -- Outdoor 14, 968 3. Volleyball 14, 881 4. Softball -- Fast Pitch 13, 146 5. Soccer 10, 503 6. Cross Country 9, 678 7. Tennis 9, 046 8. Swimming & Diving 6, 708 9. Competitive Spirit Squads 3, 743 10. Golf 456, 967 444, 181 405, 832 373, 448 337, 632 183, 376 176, 696 143, 639 95, 177 66, 283 Basketball Track & Field -- Outdoor Softball -- Fast Pitch Volleyball Cross Country Soccer Tennis Golf Swimming & Diving Competitive Spirit Squads 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

7. NATIONAL FEDERATION SPORTS PARTICIPATION SURVEY FOR 2007 Year 1971 -72 1972 -73 1973 7. NATIONAL FEDERATION SPORTS PARTICIPATION SURVEY FOR 2007 Year 1971 -72 1972 -73 1973 -74 1975 -76 1977 -78 1978 -79 1979 -80 1980 -81 1981 -82 1982 -83 1983 -84 1984 -85 1985 -86 1986 -87 1987 -88 1988 -89 1989 -90 Athletics Participation Survey Totals Boys Girls Boys Participants Total Year Participants 3, 666, 917 294, 015 3, 960, 932 1990 -91 3, 406, 355 3, 770, 621 817, 073 4, 587, 694 1991 -92 3, 429, 853 4, 070, 125 1, 300, 169 5, 370, 294 1992 -93 3, 416, 389 4, 109, 021 1, 645, 039 5, 754, 060 1993 -94 3, 472, 967 4, 367, 442 2, 083, 040 6, 450, 482 1994 -95 3, 536, 359 3, 709, 512 1, 854, 400 5, 563, 912 1995 -96 3, 634, 052 3, 517, 829 1, 750, 264 5, 268, 093 1996 -97 3, 706, 225 3, 503, 124 1, 853, 789 5, 356, 913 1997 -98 3, 763, 120 3, 409, 081 1, 810, 671 5, 219, 752 1998 -99 3, 832, 352 3, 355, 558 1, 779, 972 5, 135, 530 1999 -00 3, 861, 749 3, 303, 599 1, 747, 346 5, 050, 945 2000 -01 3, 921, 069 3, 354, 284 1, 757, 884 5, 112, 168 2001 -02 3, 960, 517 3, 344, 275 1, 807, 121 5, 151, 396 2002 -03 3, 988, 738 3, 364, 082 1, 836, 356 5, 200, 438 2003 -04 4, 038, 253 3, 425, 777 1, 849, 684 5, 275, 461 2004 -05 4, 110, 319 3, 416, 844 1, 839, 352 5, 256, 196 2005 -06 4, 206, 549 3, 398, 192 1, 858, 659 5, 256, 851 2006 -07 4, 321, 103 Girls Participants 1, 892, 316 1, 940, 801 1, 997, 489 2, 130, 315 2, 240, 461 2, 367, 936 2, 474, 043 2, 570, 333 2, 652, 726 2, 675, 874 2, 784, 154 2, 806, 998 2, 856, 358 2, 865, 299 2, 908, 390 2, 953, 355 3, 021, 807 Total 5, 298, 671 5, 370, 654 5, 413, 878 5, 603, 282 5, 776, 820 6, 001, 988 6, 180, 268 6, 333, 453 6, 485, 078 6, 537, 623 6, 705, 223 6, 767, 515 6, 845, 096 6, 903, 552 7, 018, 709 7, 159, 904 7, 342, 910

8. CIAC STAFF DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITY PAUL HOEY JOE TONELLI BOB LEHR CIAC Sport 8. CIAC STAFF DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITY PAUL HOEY JOE TONELLI BOB LEHR CIAC Sport Committees Baseball Boys/Girls Basketball Football Boys/Girls Golf Boys/Girls Soccer Boys/Girls Cross Country Field Hockey Ice Hockey Boys/Girls Lacrosse Boys/Girls Indoor Track Boys/Girls Outdoor Track Gymnastics Softball Boys/Girls Swimming Boys/Girls Tennis Boys/Girls Volleyball Wrestling General Committees Officials Sportsmanship Cooperative Team Seasons Limitations Chemical Health Liaison to CIAC Board of Control CIAC Board Hearings Scholar-Athlete Banquet Athletic Program Evaluation New AD Workshop

9. TOURNAMENT PACKET SCHEDULE FOR 2008 -2009 Fall Sports (First practice date is August 9. TOURNAMENT PACKET SCHEDULE FOR 2008 -2009 Fall Sports (First practice date is August 29) • • May 27 information to Judy June 9 Judy completes drafts and provides them to office staff and assigned committee member(s) for review June 23 changes submitted to Judy June 30 packets published for schools Winter Sports (First practice date is November 30) • • August 26 information to Judy September 9 Judy completes drafts and provides them to office staff and assigned committee member(s) for review September 23 changes submitted to Judy October 14 packets published for schools Spring Sports (First practice date is March 22) • • December 10 information to Judy December 24 Judy completes drafts and provides them to office staff and assigned committee member(s) for review January 8 changes submitted to Judy January 22 packets published for schools Packets published 60 days prior to first practice date (in winter first practice date for girls basketball is a week earlier than other winter sports).

10. SOCCER - YELLOW AND RED CARD TOTALS Boys (922 total – 63 red, 10. SOCCER - YELLOW AND RED CARD TOTALS Boys (922 total – 63 red, 929 yellow) Girls (197 total – 10 red, 187 yellow) Total Cards # Schools 0 6 1 14 2 24 3 15 4 24 5 21 6 12 7 14 8 10 9 13 10 4 11 7 12 3 13 5 14 1 15 1 Total Cards # Schools 0 25 1 41 2 18 3 10 4 10 5 4 6 5 Red Cards # Schools 0 135 1 29 2 8 3 2 Red Cards # Schools 0 143 1 10 Yellow Cards # Schools 0 7 1 14 2 23 3 19 4 27 5 18 6 12 7 16 8 11 9 7 10 9 11 4 12 5 13 1 14 1 Yellow Cards # Schools 0 66 1 44 2 15 3 11 4 8 5 6 6 3

Boys Soccer Card Report 2007 Boys Soccer Card Report 2007

Girls Soccer Card Report 2007 Girls Soccer Card Report 2007

11. COACHING REGULATIONS -- Review and Recommendations for Changes by SDE 1. Volunteers “Volunteer 11. COACHING REGULATIONS -- Review and Recommendations for Changes by SDE 1. Volunteers “Volunteer Coaches” – * When term volunteer coach is used to identify the fact that a person is not being paid. All coaches, paid or volunteering, need a coaching permit even if they are working “under the direct and continuous supervision of a coach. ” Statement #5 in the present coaching regulations which states, “An individual who serves as a coach shall hold a coaching permit or a temporary coaching permit. An individual, not serving as any type of coach, may assist a coach, if working under the direct and continual supervision of a coach” will be removed for purposes of clarity. In other words, a person who works under the direct and continued supervision of a coach cannot, at any time, coach or instruct student-athletes. This is the official interpretation of the CSDE in effect at the present time. 2. CPR / First Aid Requirements a. Consistency between Five Year Coaching Permits and Temporary Emergency Coaching Permits. * When the regulations are revised (two years) the time lines for First Aid and CPR will be the same for the five year permit and the TEP. The regulation will not require TEP’s to be re-certified in First Aid every year once changes are approved. However, at the present time TEP’s must receive First Aid certification every year. b. On-line Courses – At this time it appears that on-line courses in first aid will satisfy the CSDE requirement. * When regulations are revised it appears that the CSDE will shift the responsibility for determining appropriate first aid and CPR courses to the local district. It would be wise to inform your school medical authorities that anticipated new regulations will require local decisions on those courses.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #1 -- ARTICLE IX (RULES OF ELIGIBILITY), Section II. 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #1 -- ARTICLE IX (RULES OF ELIGIBILITY), Section II. B. Explanation of change: To allow student-athletes to compete up through their 19 th year. Article IX, Section II B. The student shall not have reached his or her twentieth (20 th) birthday. A student-athlete will not be allowed to start a season* or compete during a season in which his/her twentieth (20 th) birthday falls. * “Season” as defined in Article IX, Section II. D. of the CIAC Bylaws Reason for change: To allow nineteen-year-old students a greater window for participating in interscholastic athletics while still preventing the participation of students who are 20 years of age or older.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #2 – ARTICLE XIII (Chemical Health Regulation) Explanation of 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #2 – ARTICLE XIII (Chemical Health Regulation) Explanation of change: To revise the existing chemical health policy to address the use of performance enhancing substances by student-athletes and to elevate the existing policy to a bylaw. The CIAC is committed to the ideal of fair play and equitable competition at all CIAC contests. This ideal stands as the foundational concept which guides significant and long-standing regulations such as, the age rule, recruitment, transfers, and others. These regulations exist to ensure that, as much as is possible, high school athletics are conducted in such a fashion that no individual athlete or team has an unfair advantage over its competitors. CIAC recognizes that the use and abuse by athletes of performance enhancing substances must be added to those behaviors which create an uneven playing field for student-athletes and all athletic programs. The use of performance enhancing substances by an athlete can and does alter the outcome of athletic events and, in so doing, has a profound impact on other schools within the league and across the state. This policy has been developed to protect the health and safety of its member school student-athletes, and to assure that no participant might be pressured to use performance enhancing drugs for the purpose of remaining competitive, or to gain a competitive advantage. The CIAC chemical health policy will establish an expectation that all member schools have a chemical health policy that requires all student-athletes playing in CIAC-controlled sports to be chemical free. The CIAC, therefore, strongly supports education and awareness training for adolescents in the use of chemical substances.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES -- Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Section B. CIAC Position 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES -- Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Section B. CIAC Position on Food Supplements Including Creatine School personnel and coaches will not dispense any drug, medication, or food supplement except as in accordance with Connecticut state law, district policy, and as prescribed by a student’s physician, dentist, physician assistant or advanced practice RN. The order is to be on record in the school health office listing dose, time, and length of order, side effects and emergency contact. There will also be a signed parental consent on file. The use of any drug, medication or food supplement in a way not described by the manufacturer should not be authorized or encouraged by school personnel and coaches. Even natural substances in unnatural amounts may have short-term or long-term negative health effects. In order to minimize health and safety risks to student-athletes, maintain ethical standards, and reduce liability risks, school personnel and coaches may NEVER supply or recommend or knowingly permit students to use any drug, medication or food supplement for the specific purpose of enhancing their athletic performance. Section C. CIAC Position on Steroids The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS), the national service organization to all 50 state high school athletic and activity associations as well as the District of Columbia, prohibits the abuse of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing substances by high school student-athletes. Such use violates legal, ethical, and competitive equity standards, and imposes long-term health risks. Further, the NFHS supports prohibitions by educational institutions, amateur and professional organizations and governmental regulators on the use of anabolic steroids and other controlled substances, except as specifically prescribed by physicians for therapeutic purposes. The CIAC fully endorses this National Federation position on steroids. Section D. CIAC Position on Drug Testing The CIAC chemical health policy does not include any form of mandatory drug testing by member schools. The CIAC strongly supports the concept of local authority in determining drug testing policies. Each Board of Education/governing body reserves the right to voluntarily implement a drug testing policy for its athletes. Drug testing of high school athletes has been demonstrated to be an effective deterrent to the use of steroids and other illegal drugs. With the use of proper safeguards drug testing is considered legal. The CIAC recommends member schools use the NCAA and the USOC list of banned performance enhancing substances and practices when designing and implementing a drug testing policy. The Connecticut Association of Boards of Education (CABE) has sample drug testing policies LEA’s may wish to consider.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES -- Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Section E. Performance Enhancing 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES -- Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Section E. Performance Enhancing Drugs Minimum Penalty The CIAC expects member schools to monitor their student athletes to assure that they are free of performance enhancing substances and to report any violations in a timely manner. A student-athlete who has been determined to have used, in or out-of-season, androgenic / anabolic steroids or other performance enhancing substances shall be declared ineligible for all CIAC-controlled activities for one hundred eighty (180) school days on each occurrence. The one hundred eighty (180) school day period of ineligibility commences on the day the CIAC Board of Control makes such determination. Any student-athlete who refuses to submit to testing as part of a member school’s Board of Education-approved random drug testing policy shall be ineligible to participate in any CIACcontrolled activities. All CIAC contests / games / tournaments / championships in which the offending athlete participated while under the influence of performance enhancing substances shall be declared forfeitures and all records will be expunged. A member school may apply to the CIAC Board of Control for reinstatement of the athlete’s eligibility to participate in CIAC-controlled activities. Any such application must include: a. The results of a CIAC-approved medically validated drug test which confirms that the student-athlete is chemical free. The test must have been completed within 30 days prior to the application. The CIAC shall not be responsible for any expenses related to this testing. b. A statement of the compelling circumstances on which the member school bases its application for reinstatement of the athletes’ eligibility.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Performance enhancing substances and practices 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #2 (Chemical Health Regulation) Performance enhancing substances and practices subject to this policy include, but are not limited to, the following: a. Anabolic agents, diuretics, peptide hormones and analogues. b. Blood doping (the intravenous injection of whole blood, packed red blood cells, or blood substitutes). c. Substances and practices identified as banned by the NCAA and the USOC. The CIAC allows member schools to make exceptions for those student-athletes with a documented medical history demonstrating the need for regular use of substances that are banned in this policy. These identified substances shall be medically prescribed by the student-athlete’s doctor for therapeutic purposes. The documentation should contain information as to the diagnosis, medical history and dosage prescribed. Reason for change: The CIAC Board of Control felt it was necessary to adopt a regulation which imposed penalties for the use of steroids and other performance-enhancing drugs both to protect student-athletes from the potentially harmful affects of such use and to ensure that all student-athletes are competing on a level playing field. Given the increased incidence of steroid use by high school students and given the CIAC’s interest in protecting student-athletes and preserving the integrity of high school athletics, the CIAC board felt it was necessary to elevate its “Chemical Health Policy” from a simple policy/guideline to an actual bylaw/regulation.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #3 -- ARTICLE IV (Organization), Section E (Committees), #2 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES CHANGE #3 -- ARTICLE IV (Organization), Section E (Committees), #2 Explanation of change: To establish term limits for coaches serving on CIAC sports committees. ARTICLE IV - ORGANIZATION (changes in bold) Section E. Committees Each committee having to do with state tournaments or meets shall include one or more athletic director and/or coaches. Voting members of committees shall be appointed by the CIAC Board executive committee and shall consist of administrators of CAS member schools and one delegate per sport tournament division classification as recommended by the Connecticut High School Coaches Association. * There will be a limit of two terms of two years each for each coach representative. Rotation of terms shall be staggered, where possible, for the purpose of maintaining a continuity of purpose. All coach consultants to CIAC sports committees must serve a specific tournament function such as a tournament director, assistant tournament director, coordinator of officials or other role that serves a particular tournament responsibility. Reason for change: To provide greater opportunities for coach representatives; to generate new, innovative ideas and fresh approaches for improvement of programs; to ensure that coaches who have served their term of office remain as consultants only if they perform a specific tournament responsibility; to provide newly appointed coaches greater opportunities to express their thoughts and ideas unencumbered by past committee influences and actions.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #3 – ARTICLE IV (Organization), Section E (Committees), #2 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #3 – ARTICLE IV (Organization), Section E (Committees), #2 * New language: (To be added to present language) Each sports committee will be allowed to appoint one additional non-voting member as recommended by the CHSCA whose term may not exceed eight continuous years of service on a single sports committee. Rationale: The Connecticut High School Coaches Association requested that the CIAC board give consideration to allowing one additional coach representative to serve on each CIAC sports committee as a non-voting ex officio ** representative. The representative would not exceed eight continuous years of service on a single committee. The request is made for the following reasons: (1) It will provide greater continuity at the CHSCA executive committee level. (2) It reinstitutes a practice of long-standing which was halted last year for the purpose of complying with CIAC by-laws. (3) It will add one more coach representative to committee deliberations. ** This position is usually filled by a coach representative who has served a full term (4 years) on a CIAC sports committee as a voting member and then transitions to an ex officio, non-voting position. (Historically, this position has been called “ex officio” even though it is an inappropriate application of the term.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #4 – CAS CONSTITUTION CHANGES CAS Constitution -- Article 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #4 – CAS CONSTITUTION CHANGES CAS Constitution -- Article IV -- Organization -- Section C -- The Board of Directors of the Connecticut Association of Schools -- 1. Composition - a. iii. Present language: One representative from each of the three classes of high schools that comprise the high school membership: large, medium and small. These classes shall be determined by the board of directors of the Connecticut Association of Schools based on the total enrollment of Grades 10 -12, as of October 1 in the even numbered years. Each class will consist of approximately one-third (1/3) of the institutional member schools so determined. Such representatives shall be principals of institutional member schools. New language: One representative from each of the three classes of high schools that comprise the high school membership: large, medium and small. These classes shall be determined by the board of directors of the Connecticut Association of Schools based on the total enrollment of Grades 9 -12 based upon the schools reported enrollment of October 1 of the previous school year. Each class will consist of approximately one-third (1/3) of the institutional member schools so determined. Such representatives shall be principals of institutional member schools. Rationale: Enrollment 10 -12 was instituted when many Connecticut secondary schools were constituted 7 -8 -9 and 10 -11 -12. All Connecticut high schools are now 9 -12. The reporting and use of enrollment 9 -12 will be an accurate reflection of the students attending each school and it will add clarity for schools and the public regarding tournament classification. (Note: Present Board or committee members whose school classification changes will be permitted to complete their term of office under their school’s old classification. ) Change #5 -- Article VII – Tournaments, Meets and Games - Section E. 1. Present language: After the enrollments as of October 1 for the current school year are received and tabulated by the Executive Director the sport committees shall determine the tournament or championship meet divisions for the following school year. New language: After the 9 -12 enrollments as of October 1 for the current school year are received and tabulated by the Executive Director the sport committees shall determine the tournament or championship meet divisions for the following school year.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #6 -- Article XI – Cooperative Team Sponsorship Present 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #6 -- Article XI – Cooperative Team Sponsorship Present language: The combined boy or girl enrollments in grades 10, 11 and 12 of the schools involved in the cooperative team will be used to determine the classification of the cooperative for the participation in CIAC tournaments. New language: The combined boy or girl enrollment in grades 9, 10, 11 and 12 of the schools involved in the cooperative team will be used to determine the classification of the cooperative for the participation in CIAC tournaments. Rationale: Enrollment 10 -12 was instituted when many Connecticut secondary schools were constituted 7 -8 -9 and 10 -11 -12. All Connecticut high schools are now 9 -12. The reporting and use of 9 -12 enrollment will be an accurate reflection of the students attending each school and it will add clarity for schools and the public regarding tournament classifications. (Note: Present Board or committee members whose school classification changes will be permitted to complete their terms of office under their school’s old classification. ) Change #7 -- Article XII – Out-of-Season Play – 2. 0 During the School Year - Out-of-Season Including the Summer – Definitions for 2. 1. b. - 1. A Bona Fide Paid Employee Present: A Bona Fide Paid Employee – Is an employee who receives at least $600 in salary for coaching service and can produce an IRS W-2 form or 1099 form which documents $600 or more in salary received from the employer. New Language: A Bona Fide paid Employee – Is an employee who receives at least $2, 000 in salary for coaching service and can produce an IRS W-2 form or 1099 form which documents $2, 000 or more in salary received from the employer. Rationale: The increase to a minimum of $2, 000 reflects the present working environment and serves to limit the manipulation of the out-of-season coaching regulations.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #8 -- Article IX -- Rules of Eligibility -- 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #8 -- Article IX -- Rules of Eligibility -- Section IV -- General Procedures -- F. Present language: Girls may participate on boys teams. Girls may participate on either a girls team or a boys team in the same sport, but not both, within a time period of one school year. However, a member school has discretion to exclude girls from boys teams when it can demonstrate that its overall sports program does not limit athletic opportunities for girls. *Girls who participate on boys teams may enter either the boys or the girls state tournament, but not both. Boys may not participate on girls teams. * New language: Girls who participate on boys teams, because the school does not offer a girls program in that sport, may enter either the boys or girls tournament, but not both. Girls who choose to participate on a boys team when the school offers a girls team in that sport, may only enter the boys tournament. Boys may not play on girls teams. Rationale: Present CIAC rules allow a girl to participate on boys teams even when an equivalent girls program exists in a school and permits the athlete to make a choice in which post season tournament they will participate. The CIAC Board believes if a female studentathlete chooses to play on a boys team in the regular season they should be required to play in the boys tournament. This change levels the playing field and does not give an advantage to a female athlete who has competed against boys all season to compete against girls in the post season.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #9 -- CIAC Code of Eligibility -- Rule IV 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES Change #9 -- CIAC Code of Eligibility -- Rule IV -- General Procedures - G Present language: On the eve of a tournament when there is not sufficient time for normal administrative procedures if a question of student or team ineligibility arises the Executive Director of CAS, in consultation with the CIAC Eligibility Committee and the Chairman of the tournament in question, will make an appropriate ad hoc decision in consideration of the best interests of the tournament as a whole. Proposed language: On the eve of or during a tournament event, when there is not sufficient time to follow normal administrative procedures regarding student or team ineligibility, or when any other issue arises that will interrupt normal tournament procedures, the executive director of CIAC (or his/her designee) in consultation with the CIAC chairperson, eligibility committee chairperson, and the chairperson of the tournament committee in question will make an appropriate ad hoc decision in consideration of the best interests of the tournament as a whole. Rationale: The CIAC staff has felt strongly for some time now that the existing language in the Code of Eligibility which gives license to a representative committee to take action on behalf of the Board of Control when it is not possible for full board involvement needs to be improved upon for the following reasons: 11. Greater range of authority for situations other than student eligibility issues is needed. Most last minute decisions involve situations specific to clarification or interpretation of tournament regulations or conditions resulting from tournament operations that require immediate, decisive action.

12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES NEW -- Article IX - Rules of Eligibility and Control 12. CIAC BY-LAW CHANGES NEW -- Article IX - Rules of Eligibility and Control for Boys and Girls High School Athletics in Connecticut - B. A. Transgender Participation CIAC rules and regulations allow transgender student-athlete participation under the following conditions: 1. A student-athlete will compete in the gender of their birth certificate unless they have undergone sex reassignment. 2. A student-athlete who has undergone sex reassignment is eligible to compete in the reassigned gender when: 1. The student-athlete has undergone sex reassignment before puberty, OR 2. The student who has undergone sex reassignment after puberty under all the following conditions: 1. Surgical anatomical changes have been completed, including external genitalia changes and gonadectomy. 2. All legal recognition of the sex reassignment has been conferred with all the proper governmental agencies. (Driver’s license, Voter Registration, etc. ) 3. Hormonal therapy appropriate for the assigned sex has been administered in a verifiable manner and for sufficient length of time to minimize gender-related advantages in sports competition. 4. Athletic eligibility in the reassigned gender can begin no sooner than two years after all surgical and anatomical changes have been completed. 5. A student-athlete seeking participation as a result of a sex reassignment can access the CIAC eligibility appeal process

13. 4. 29 D. SPRING FOOTBALL PRACTICE Football At the request of the CIAC 13. 4. 29 D. SPRING FOOTBALL PRACTICE Football At the request of the CIAC Board of Control the football committee has held three meetings to discuss various alternatives that would be acceptable in lieu of holding spring football. Several options were discussed but ultimately lost support because they presented other administrative problems or did not satisfy the needs of the coaches on the committee. In discussing various alternatives the committee considered the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. CIAC football committee survey of coaches, athletic directors and administrators (see attachment) The position of the executive board of CAAD Letters in support of and in opposition to spring football National Federation survey of state high school associations The football committee, especially the coaches, believe that it is important for Connecticut high school football that the CIAC Board allow the continuation of spring football with the following understandings: 1. No spring athlete shall be expected to attend or in any way be penalized for not attending spring football practice prior to the completion of his spring sports regular and post season. 2. All academic and school conflicts including, but not limited to, receiving tutorial support, completing longterm assignments, test preparation (SAT’s, etc. ), proms, school concerts, award programs, class trips and preparing for final examinations shall take precedence over an athlete’s attendance at spring practice. 3. There shall be NO practices conducted during a member school’s exam period with the exception of Friday prior to a Monday exam. 4. All present spring football practice regulations will remain in place

13. SPRING FOOTBALL PRACTICE CONNECTICUT INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE To: From: Re: Date: CIAC Board 13. SPRING FOOTBALL PRACTICE CONNECTICUT INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC CONFERENCE To: From: Re: Date: CIAC Board of Control CIAC Staff Proposed Alternative for Spring Football March 20, 2008 The staff has been intimately involved with the football committee in its discussions of alternatives to holding spring football. As a result of its involvement, and, with the full awareness of the committee, the staff encourages the board to consider the following option to the existing policy. This alternative is for consideration only if the board votes to maintain spring football practice in accordance to present policy. It is NOT intended to supplant or replace spring football. It is intended to provide school administrators with an option that may serve their school’s needs more advantageously. Recommendation: For those schools which choose to eliminate spring football practice they will be provided the option to start their football fall practice season five (5) days early. The existing regulations for the fall week of conditioning will remain the same as presently defined in the CIAC Handbook. However, those schools will be allowed five additional days of practice prior to the start of the fall season. Schools would need to choose to participate in spring football or opt for the five days in August by January 30 of each school year. The staff made a commitment to the football committee that while this is a viable and reasonable alternative it should not replace traditional spring football for those schools that believe it is absolutely imperative to hold practice at this time of year. Rationale for Proposal: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Most school athletic directors believe that an option for schools will provide greater flexibility for solving existing problems they now face. Many high school football coaches support an early fall practice period in lieu of the traditional spring football practice sessions. School administrators may find an early fall start to the football season much more favorable because it eliminates or substantially reduces the conflicts that present exist with spring football. It includes all students enrolled in the school to practice, whereas, spring football eliminates the opportunity for prospective ninth graders from learning the game. Schools that graduate early and have no or greatly reduced spring practice now have a choice.

14. REORGANIZATION OF CIAC BOARD OF CONTROL Proposal to Reorganize the CIAC Board of 14. REORGANIZATION OF CIAC BOARD OF CONTROL Proposal to Reorganize the CIAC Board of Control To Allow for Greater Representation from Leagues Chairman Barney presented a concept to the Board for reorganization to assure that all leagues are represented on the Board of Control. He provided a possible reorganization for discussion purposes. After considerable discussion the proposal in the format presented raised several issues, however, the Board was amenable to the concept and it was suggested the nomination committee seek representation from all leagues when filling positions. Additionally, the Board could consider expanding the number of Board members to assure all leagues or areas of the state are represented. Staff will prepare possible modifications of the present structure at the February meeting.

15. BROADCASTING CIAC ATHLETIC EVENTS LETTER OF AGREEMENT This letter of agreement, dated the 15. BROADCASTING CIAC ATHLETIC EVENTS LETTER OF AGREEMENT This letter of agreement, dated the 6 th day of February 2008, by and between the Connecticut Association of Schools/Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (“CIAC”), Meredith Corporation, licensee of WFSB (“WFSB”) and Connecticut Public Broadcasting, Inc. (“CPBI”), concerns the creation and implementation of a plan for the broadcast of CIAC high school tournament athletic contests on CPTV-2 or a digital program service of CPBI (not CPTV-1). WFSB and CPBI plan to form a joint venture (“Joint Venture”), part of which is to distribute for television various CIAC high school athletic contests, which the parties intend will air either on CPTV-2 or on a digital program channel other than CPTV 1. CIAC shall grant the Joint Venture the right to produce and air telecasts of such contests for a period of three years following the date of this Letter of Agreement. The rights granted shall include be exclusive to the Joint Venture and shall include rights to broadcast and distribute the contests via television, cable, radio, webcast, and any other digital medium. However, the CIAC reserves the right to grant permission to local radio stations/webcasters with long-standing ties to a particular school/district and/or a history of covering sports events for a particular school/district to broadcast audio only coverage of tournament events over the air and/or over the internet. The copyright, except as modified by the rights herein granted, shall belong to CIAC. No financial or other consideration will be paid by the Joint Venture, WFSB, or CPBI in exchange for obtaining the rights as defined as part of this Letter of Agreement. The Joint Venture shall bear all of the costs of producing and airing the contests. In return the joint venture may sell commercial time for insertion into the broadcasts, and may sell sponsorships related to the broadcast. The Joint Venture shall abide by reasonable commercial and sponsorship categorical restrictions imposed by CIAC, consistent with the nature of the broadcasts. The number of contests covered and the particular contests covered shall be subject to the mutual agreement of the parties. However, the Joint Venture would commit to broadcast of the state football and boy’s and girl’s basketball championship games. The Joint Venture would have first right of refusal on any other tournaments or events that the CIAC has the rights to broadcast, such as the Ice Hockey Championship. The Joint Venture and the CIAC shall work together to develop select sponsorship programs for potential businesses. Further, opportunities for acknowledgement (e. g. identification only) of existing sponsors will be made available to both the Joint Venture and the CIAC. Finally, the Joint Venture and the CIAC will work together to develop educational and/or promotional PSAs that could air within the Joint Venture’s commercial inventory. The CIAC will serve as the liaison between the Joint Venture and the CIAC member schools for the purpose of coordinating the broadcasts of any regular season athletic contests.

16. 1. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST Who Should the Board Hold Accountable 16. 1. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST Who Should the Board Hold Accountable for Knowledge of CIAC Rules Should CIAC hold the student-athlete accountable for knowing the rules? The Board discussed in detail if and when the athletes and their parents should be responsible for knowing the rules of CIAC. Discussion ensued in which rules/regulations are essential for the athlete and parents to know and understand. The discussion expanded to what principals, athletic directors and coaches should also be held accountable for. The Board concluded this area needs to be addressed and should be a Board goal. The staff suggested the Board identify the critical elements that each should know and be held accountable for. Staff further suggested at the next meeting of the Board members sign-up for a sub-committee to identify critical elements and suggested processes for educating and communicating the rules and regulations of CIAC. Additionally, the Board will be surveyed on which student eligibility regulations are most essential and which, if any, could be eliminated prior to the next meeting. CIAC Board Minutes 11/15/07 2. Wheelchair Athletes -- Participation in Track and Field Championships The Board reviewed material provided by staff on wheelchair athletes and their participation in championship events. The Pennsylvania policy was discussed and the Board asked that this matter be referred to the track committee for review and the drafting of appropriate regulations. The Board further requests that other sports committees draft regulations for disabled athletes -- such as the use of carts in golf -- so that the participation of disabled athletes, where appropriate, is discussed by each sports committee.

16. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST 3. UNIFIED SPORTS The Unified Sports Team 16. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST 3. UNIFIED SPORTS The Unified Sports Team and the CIAC Board of Control wishes to thank all of the Athletic Directors in the state who have helped make this program a model of success for the rest of the country. Your leadership, commitment to the program and willingness to give of your time have changed the lives of hundreds of intellectually challenged student athletes state-wide We currently have 47 active high schools and 35 active middle schools and are reaching out to all of our schools to get involved. At the present time the following conferences have included CIAC Unified Sports as an integral part of their work and have hosted sports events this past year: FCIAC SCC CCC ECC NORTHWEST

16. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST 4. CIAC ATHLETIC PROGRAM EVALUATION The CIAC 16. OTHER TOPICS OF IMPORTANCE / INTEREST 4. CIAC ATHLETIC PROGRAM EVALUATION The CIAC Board has committed $50, 000. 00 to continue to promote and administer the CIAC Athletic Program Evaluation project. The funds will be used for the evaluation process, providing a comprehensive report and any follow-up activity which would be requested by the school district to assist them in implementing the recommendations for improvement resulting from the evaluation. SCHOOLS WHICH HAVE BEEN EVALUATED 2006 – 2007 HAND HIGH SCHOOLS AND MIDDLE SCHOOLS 2007 – 2008 SIMSBURY HIGH SCHOOL SOUTHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL WILTON HIGH SCHOOLS PRESENTLY DOING THE SELF-STUDY DERBY HIGH SCHOOL THE MORGAN SCHOOL EAST HAMPTON HIGH SCHOOL EAST LYME SCHOOL JONATHAN LAW HIGH SCHOOL SHELTON HIGH SCHOOL SOUTH WINDSOR HIGH SCHOOL CONSIDERING FOR 2008 – 2009 NEW FAIRFIELD HIGH SCHOOL STAMFORD HIGH SCHOOLS EVALUATORS USED THUS FAR ADMINISTRATORS ATHLETIC DIRECTORS ELAINE BESSETTE JOE GUAY VIN IEZZI PAT LLODRA BOB LEHR BARBARA STARTUP JOE TONELLI