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An Introduction To School Meals Evanston/Skokie School District #65 1/15/09 Copyright © 2007 School An Introduction To School Meals Evanston/Skokie School District #65 1/15/09 Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Presenters Meghan Gibbons ETHS • Christine Frole D 65 • • • Registered Dietitian Presenters Meghan Gibbons ETHS • Christine Frole D 65 • • • Registered Dietitian (RD) Licensed Dietitian Nutritionist (LDN) Registered Dietitian (RD) Active Member in: • • • School Nutrition Association Illinois Nutrition Association (Nutrition Chair and incoming Vice President) American Dietetics Association Northern Illinois Independent Purchasing Cooperative (Executive Board Member) Action For Healthy Kids (State and National Associations) Illinois Nutrition Education and Training (ILNET) Illinois Interagency Nutrition Council (INC) Consortium to Lower Obesity in Chicago Children (CLOCC) University of IL Dietetics Program ETHS Green Committee, Wellness Council, and Recycling Club • • • School Nutrition Association Illinois Nutrition Association (Past Publicity Chair) American Dietetics Association Illinois Dietetics Association-School Nutrition Professionals Dietetics Practice Group Northern Illinois Independent Purchasing Cooperative (Executive Board Member) Illinois Nutrition Education and Training (ILNET) University of IL Dietetics Program District 65 Wellness Council (05 -06 Chair) Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Agenda • The facts about school meals – Enrollment and Participation – USDA Guidelines Agenda • The facts about school meals – Enrollment and Participation – USDA Guidelines & Nutrition – Food Safety – Budget – Local Wellness Policy – Getting Involved • Q&A Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts School Lunch & Breakfast 9 Schools now serve breakfast!! School Meals – The Facts School Lunch & Breakfast 9 Schools now serve breakfast!! _ – – – 6, 200 enrolled (K-8) 3, 000 children served lunch daily 513, 000 lunches served annually (171 days) 300 breakfasts served daily 53, 100 breakfasts served annually (177 days) 41% of District 65 students are eligible for free/reduced meals – 85% of meals produced are served to free/reduced eligible students Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts • School meals are balanced and healthy • Lunches School Meals – The Facts • School meals are balanced and healthy • Lunches that are part of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) must meet USDA dietary/nutrition guidelines including: • limiting fat (less than 30%) and saturated fat (less than 10%) in meals • providing one-third of the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of calories, protein, calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C. • Must offer: 8 fl oz milk, 2 oz meat/meat alternate, ¾ cup fruit/vegetable + ½ cup over a week, 12 breads weekly and 664 calories/day for grades K-6, 825 cal grades 7 -12 • NSLP lunches are served in age appropriate portion sizes and provide the right balance of protein, dairy, whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts • School meals are healthier than ever! Kids are School Meals – The Facts • School meals are healthier than ever! Kids are offered healthy, tasty and appealing choices: – – – Fresh fruits and vegetables Whole grains Reduced Fat, Low Sodium, High Fiber Reduced or zero Trans Fats Fresh Salads and sandwiches Pizza with whole grain crust, low-fat cheese Whole grain pasta All items are baked rather than fried (no fryers on premises) Healthful cooking/preparation techniques Only baked chips are offered Food Services does not operate any vending machines Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts • School Meals help kids maintain a healthy weight School Meals – The Facts • School Meals help kids maintain a healthy weight – Students who eat school meals provided through the NSLP and the SBP are more likely to be at a healthy weight. * – NSLP participants are more likely than non-participants to consume vegetables, milk and milk products, and meat and other protein-rich foods, both at lunch and over 24 hours; they also consume less soda and/or fruit drinks. ** – This benefit is especially relevant for kids and their parents in today’s climate of heightened awareness of obesity issue. – Students are less likely to gain weight during the school year when in school than during the summer when school is out. *Source Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, August 2003 **Source USDA Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts • School Meals include USDA commodity foods – USDA School Meals – The Facts • School Meals include USDA commodity foods – USDA has made significant progress in reducing the fat, sodium and added sugar in commodity foods. – Ground beef was reduced to an average 15% fat, as compared to an average 30% fat content in the fast food industry. – Commodity canned fruits are only bought with light syrup and fruit juice verses heavy syrup. – A wide variety of fresh, frozen and canned fruit and vegetable products are offered. Over 50% of commodities available to schools are grains, fruits and vegetables. – Our district participates in the Department of Defense (DOD) Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Program which provides ~$10 K annually for the purchase of fresh produce. Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

School Meals – The Facts • School meals are safe • USDA commodities used School Meals – The Facts • School meals are safe • USDA commodities used in the NSLP are safe and part of a nutritious school lunch. • School nutrition professionals have rigorous training in food safety and have implemented a HACCP Plan. (Time/Temp) • School kitchens are subject to three health inspections annually conducted by the local health department. • According to the Food and Drug Administration, school kitchens are among the safest of commercial and institutional foodservice establishments. • At least one Food Service employee at each school is certified by the City of Evanston and IL Department of Public Health in Food Service Sanitation. Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Dollars & Sense • Federal NSLP Reimbursement Rates: FREE = $2. 59 REDUCED = Dollars & Sense • Federal NSLP Reimbursement Rates: FREE = $2. 59 REDUCED = $2. 19 PAID = $0. 26 $3. 00 (The average cost to prepare and serve a lunch) -1. 50 Labor, equipment, fuel/delivery costs, service/maintenance, employee benefits and other indirect costs -1. 50 Actual Food Cost (including milk) + Paper Goods • $2. 59 -$3. 00 = Deficit of $0. 41/free meal • $2. 19 - $3. 00 = Deficit of $0. 81/reduced meal • $2. 76 - $3. 00 = Deficit of $0. 24/paid meal Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Ø Federal Reimbursement has not kept pace with cost of living. Ø Commodities/entitlement dollars Ø Federal Reimbursement has not kept pace with cost of living. Ø Commodities/entitlement dollars remain limited. Ø A la Carte Sales have plummeted as less healthful foods and beverages have been replaced with more healthful options. Ø Adult Meal Sales are declining as districts are required to increase adult meal prices to ensure CN funds are used only to benefit students. Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Local Wellness Policy • Our school district has guidelines for – – – School Local Wellness Policy • Our school district has guidelines for – – – School meals A la carte cafeteria sales Vending machines Classroom parties and special events Fundraising events • Wellness policies are comprehensive – Physical Activity and Nutrition Education are included Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Middle School A La Carte Offerings Approved Beverages • Flavored or plain reduced fat Middle School A La Carte Offerings Approved Beverages • Flavored or plain reduced fat (2%), low-fat (1%), skim/nonfat fluid milk meeting State and local standards for pasteurized fluid milk and/or USDA approved alternative dairy beverages; • 100% full-strength fruit and vegetable juices; and • Water (non-flavored, non-sweetened, and non-carbonated) • Any beverage exempted from the USDA’s list of FMNV Any Other Individual Food Sales/Service • Calories from total fat must be at or below 30 % excluding nuts, seeds, nut butters, eggs, cheese packaged for individual sale, or any other food listed in Appendix B to the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This is determined by dividing the calories from total fat by the total calories and multiplying by 100. If calories from fat are not available, multiply the grams of fat by 9 to equal calories from fat. • Total sugar must be at or below 35% by weight. This is determined by dividing the grams of total sugar by the gram weight of the product and multiplying by 100. This includes both naturally occurring and added sugars. This limit does not include fruits and vegetables or flavored milk as defined above. • Portion size for a la carte sales in the school cafeteria are not to exceed the serving size of the food served in the National School Lunch Program/School Breakfast Program. Single serving size, calories<200. • Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value**Examples of products that cannot be sold/served include: Chewing gum, hard candies, marshmallows, fondants, licorice, jellies, and candy-coated popcorn. • The Department of Food Services does not operate vending machines in the District or sell a la carte items in elementary schools (only milk). Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Non–Food Ways to Raise Funds Things you can sell and do! • • • Non–Food Ways to Raise Funds Things you can sell and do! • • • • • • • • • • Raffle Candles Books and calendars Brick / stone / tile memorials Buttons, pins and stickers Coupon books Emergency kits for cars or first aid kits Flea Market Gift or Fruit and Vegetable baskets Gift wrap, boxes and bags Bowling Night Carnivals Rent out a local nail salon for a manicure and pedicure spa night Dances Celebrity basketball game Family glamour portraits Jewelry License plate frames with school logo Magazine subscriptions Personalized Stationary Scarves Cookbooks Car wash Walk-a-thon, Bike-a-thon, Jog-a-thon, Read-a-thon, Jump-rope-a-thon Recycling cans/paper/ink cartridges Skate night Spelling Bee Talent shows Student artwork Stadium pillows / Football seat Holiday ornaments / decorations Shopping donation programs Faculty and/or student talent show Teacher/student sports competition Auction of donated goods and services Refillable water bottle with the school logo Greeting cards, especially designed by students School spirit items — tee-shirts, sweatpants, lanyards, pennants, bracelets and caps Growing and/or selling flowers, bulbs and plants. Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Easy Non-Food Rewards or Classroom Party Ideas • • • • • Going first Easy Non-Food Rewards or Classroom Party Ideas • • • • • Going first Verbal praise Sit by friends Teaching the class Helping the teacher Enjoy class outdoors A field trip for the class Choosing a class activity Walk with a teacher during lunch Eat lunch outdoors with the class Eat lunch with a teacher or principal Extra credit or class participation points Taking care of the class animal for a day Have lunch or breakfast in the classroom A photo recognition board in a prominent location in the school A note from the teacher to the student commending his or her achievement A phone call, email, or letter sent home to parents or guardians commending a child’s accomplishment Recognition of a child’s achievement on the school-wide morning announcements or school website Ribbon, certificate in recognition of achievement or a sticker with an affirming message (e. g. “Great job”) Take a trip to the treasure box (filled with: stickers, temporary tattoos, pencils, pens, highlighters, sidewalk chalk, notepads, erasers, bookmarks, etc. ) Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

 • • • • • • • • • • • Healthful Food • • • • • • • • • • • Healthful Food and Beverage Options for Parents and Staff Granola Bars Cereal Bars Milk and Cereal Bars Reduced Sugar Dry Cereal Bowls – e. g. , NEW Fruity Cheerios Chex Mix Sun Chips (Original, Cheddar, Garden Salsa, French Onion) Baked Chips in = / < 1 oz portions Pretzels / Honey Braid Pretzels Munchies Kids Mix Trail Mix (Dried fruits and nuts) Ritz Chips (Baked) 100 Calorie Packs (e. g. , Wheat Thins, Oreos, Cheese Nips) Crackers w/Reduced Fat Cheese Fresh Fruit - Whole or cut into “smiles” for easy eating (Oranges, Apples) with yogurt dip or peanut butter Raw Veggies w/Reduced Fat Ranch Dressing/Dip (Baby Carrots, Celery Sticks, Broccoli Florets, Cucumber Sticks, Bell Pepper Chunks, etc. ) Ants on a Log - If no danger of peanut allergy in group, Celery Sticks filled with Peanut Butter, Sprinkled with Raisins Popcorn – w/o Butter Beef Jerky – Original and Teriyaki Yogurt Pretzels Yogurt Raisins Applesauce Cups 4 or 6 oz. 100% Fruit Juice Cups Bagels – try offering jelly instead of cream cheese; offer cream cheese only occasionally Dried Fruit (Raisins, Figs, Prunes [Texas Raisins, ] Apricots, etc. ) Dried Cranberries – Craisins (Lightly sweetened and very tasty!) Roasted Almonds, Pecans and/or Walnuts Sunflower Nuts String Cheese Sticks Pudding Cups 4 oz or 6 oz Yogurt Cups 8 oz. Or 16 oz Reduced Fat Milk – Chocolate, Strawberry, Unflavored 100% Frozen Juice Bars Lean meats and reduced fat cheese mini or full-sized sandwiches Reduced fat crackers with reduced fat cheese Pasta Salad Bread sticks with marinara Fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products (string cheese, cottage cheese, cheese cubes) Bottled water Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Getting Involved • Parents – Parents and school nutrition professionals share the same goals: Getting Involved • Parents – Parents and school nutrition professionals share the same goals: • Well-balanced nutritious meals for their kids • Creating healthy eating habits for life – Parents are role models and influence what kids eat – Encourage healthy eating and lifestyles at home for you and your kids (actions speak louder than words…) – Contact your school principal to get involved with your School Wellness Committee Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Getting Involved Parents – Review the cafeteria menu with your kids to help them Getting Involved Parents – Review the cafeteria menu with your kids to help them plan for a balanced meal – Encourage your student to participate in the Wellness Week Promotions (3 annually) – Join your kids for school lunch or school breakfast – Communicate any concerns or special diets your kids may have – Invite the school nutrition director and/or Wellness Council Facilitator to make presentations to parents about the benefits of school meals and a healthy lifestyle at PTA meetings and in the classroom – Tell us what you think!!! Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

The Future • We support forward thinking programs like: – Taste testing with parents The Future • We support forward thinking programs like: – Taste testing with parents and students – Advocating for additional state and federal financial support esp. Eliminating the Reduced Price Meal category – National school food and beverage standards legislation to promote healthy school nutrition environments across the country – Increased focus on nutrition education incorporating the cafeteria as a learning lab – Increasing Breakfast program participation Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org

Contact Us Christine Frole, RD Coordinator of Food & Nutrition Services Evanston/Skokie District 65 Contact Us Christine Frole, RD Coordinator of Food & Nutrition Services Evanston/Skokie District 65 847 -859 -8480 frolec@district 65. net Meghan Gibbons, RD, LDN Director of Nutrition Services Evanston Township High School 847 -424 -7225 gibbonsm@eths. k 12. il. us Copyright © 2007 School Nutrition Association. All Rights Reserved. www. schoolnutrition. org