Скачать презентацию 12 2 Reconstructing Society Various groups contribute to Скачать презентацию 12 2 Reconstructing Society Various groups contribute to

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12. 2 Reconstructing Society Various groups contribute to the rebuilding of Southern society after 12. 2 Reconstructing Society Various groups contribute to the rebuilding of Southern society after the war. NEXT

SECTION 2 I. Conditions in the Postwar South A. Physical and Economic Conditions • SECTION 2 I. Conditions in the Postwar South A. Physical and Economic Conditions • By 1870, all Confederate states in Union (Rep. govts) • Buildings, infrastructure, farms destroyed • People poor; property value plummets, Confederate bonds worthless • 1/5 white males dead, many maimed; tens of thousands black males dead B. Public Works Programs • Transportation; homes for orphans, disabled; public schools built • Northern capitalists do not invest in South; states must raise taxes NEXT

SECTION 2 II. Politics in the Postwar South A. Scalawags and Carpetbaggers • Democrats SECTION 2 II. Politics in the Postwar South A. Scalawags and Carpetbaggers • Democrats call Southern white Republicans scalawags - most are small farmers - want better economic position • Carpetbaggers—Northerners who moved to South after war B. African Americans as Voters • Af-Ams are largest group of Southern Republicans • In many areas, 90% of Af-Am voters vote 'The Man with the (Carpet) Bags' cartoon by Thomas Nast, 1872, depicting the Southern attitude toward Northerners during Reconstruction" Continued. . . NEXT

SECTION 2 C. Political Differences • Few scalawags support civil rights for blacks; many SECTION 2 C. Political Differences • Few scalawags support civil rights for blacks; many rejoin Democrats • Many whites refuse to accept new status or equal rights for blacks NEXT

SECTION 2 III. Former Slaves Face Many Challenges A. New-Won Freedoms • At first, SECTION 2 III. Former Slaves Face Many Challenges A. New-Won Freedoms • At first, former slaves cautious about testing limits of freedom • Many leave plantations to find work in Southern towns B. Reunification of Families • Many search for loved ones on different plantations • Couples can marry legally and be sure of keeping their children Former slaves in a Southern city shortly after the Civil War. Continued. . . NEXT

SECTION 2 C. Education • Freed people of all ages seek education • Af-Ams SECTION 2 C. Education • Freed people of all ages seek education • Af-Ams establish schools and universities D. Churches and Volunteer Groups • Many Af-Ams found churches • Black ministers become influential community leaders • Af-Ams form thousands of volunteer organizations: - foster independence - give financial, emotional support Continued. . . NEXT

SECTION 2 E. Politics and African Americans • 1865– 1877, Af-Ams hold local, state, SECTION 2 E. Politics and African Americans • 1865– 1877, Af-Ams hold local, state, federal office • At first, most officeholders freeborn; by 1867 some former slaves - only 16 Af-Ams in Congress - Hiram Revels is first black senator F. Laws Against Segregation • By 1866, Republican govts repeal most black codes • Anti-segregation laws created, but many not enforced • Blacks focus on building up their community, not total integration Continued. . . NEXT

SECTION 2 IV. Changes in the Southern Economy A. Restoration of Plantations • Af-Ams, SECTION 2 IV. Changes in the Southern Economy A. Restoration of Plantations • Af-Ams, poor whites want small farms • Planters, Northern merchants, mill owners want cotton plantations • Planters fear will be unable to make profit if must pay wages • Freedmen work in mills, railroad, farming Continued. . . NEXT

SECTION 2 B. Sharecropping and Tenant Farming • Landless Af-Ams sign labor contracts with SECTION 2 B. Sharecropping and Tenant Farming • Landless Af-Ams sign labor contracts with planters • Sharecropping—owner gives land, seed, tools for part of crops • Tenant farming—rent land from owner; buy own tools C. Cotton No Longer King • Other countries increase cotton production; South creates oversupply • Try to diversify—textiles, tobacco products; wages lower than North • Banks hold Confederate debt, mounting planters’ debts; many fail NEXT