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1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking Take Charge of Your Finances © Family 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking Take Charge of Your Finances © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Lesson Objectives: – Describe electronic banking 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Lesson Objectives: – Describe electronic banking – Define the different types of electronic banking – Understand how to safely use an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) and debit card © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) is the 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) is the electronic movement of money that allows electronic banking or ebanking to be accomplished. • E-banking allows a person to make withdrawals, deposits, and bill payments by one of the following methods: – – Phone Computer Automated teller machine (ATM) Point of sale terminal (POS) © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Benefits of e-banking include: – 24 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Benefits of e-banking include: – 24 hour access – Fast transactions – Paperless transactions – Convenience – Worldwide access © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Debit Cards • Debit Cards are plastic cards, which 1. 7. 2. G 1 Debit Cards • Debit Cards are plastic cards, which look like credit cards, but are electronically connected to a card holder’s depository institution account. – Money is automatically withdrawn from the designated account when a purchase is made. • Debit cards can be used when there is not enough money in the account, which will result in a non- sufficient fund fee. • For added protection, sign the back of a debit card in the signature box with “see id. ” – This will prompt the vendor to match a picture id and name to the individual using the debit card. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Personal Identification Numbers • Debit cards require the use 1. 7. 2. G 1 Personal Identification Numbers • Debit cards require the use of PIN (Personal Identification numbers). • Personal Identification Number (PIN) is a number that is entered in at an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) or Point of Sale Terminal (POS) • This confirms that the individual is authorized to access that particular account. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Consumer Liability • According to the Federal Trade Commission, 1. 7. 2. G 1 Consumer Liability • According to the Federal Trade Commission, a consumer is held liable for any unauthorized charges under the following conditions: – If timely notice is given of lost or theft to the depository institution within two business days: • The consumer is held responsible for no more then $50. – If the institution is notified within the first two business days, but within the first 60 days: • The consumer is held liable for no more then $500. – If the institution is notified after the first 60 days: • The consumer is held liable for no more than the amount of the unauthorized transfers. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Automated Teller Machines • Automated Teller Machines (ATM’s) are 1. 7. 2. G 1 Automated Teller Machines • Automated Teller Machines (ATM’s) are electronic computer terminals which offer automated, computerized banking. • Transactions allowed may include: – Deposits – Cash withdrawals – Transfers between accounts – Account balance information • Some ATMs may only allow cash withdrawals © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 ATMs continued • ATMs can be found at various 1. 7. 2. G 1 ATMs continued • ATMs can be found at various places – Examples: depository institutions, supermarkets, convenience stores. • ATMs are accessed with an ATM or debit card and a PIN. • Fees may be charged for ATM use, but will vary depending on the particular depository institution. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Point of Sale Terminal • Point of Sale Terminal 1. 7. 2. G 1 Point of Sale Terminal • Point of Sale Terminal (POS), are located at stores and allows the customer to use a debit card to make a purchase. – A debit card’s magnetic strip is swiped through the POS. – After the required PIN is provided, the transaction is authorized. – If the purchase is under $25. 00 a signature may not be required. • At participating POS terminals customers may request additional cash back. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Direct Deposit • Direct Deposit – Paychecks and benefit 1. 7. 2. G 1 Direct Deposit • Direct Deposit – Paychecks and benefit checks are directly deposited into a specified depository institution account. • The customer signs an authorization form with his or her employer to authorize the electronic deposit. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Direct Payment • Direct Payment authorizes bills to be 1. 7. 2. G 1 Direct Payment • Direct Payment authorizes bills to be paid by a specific depository institution account. – This can be done for fixed and flexible expenses. Examples include: • Mortgages, vehicle payments, phone bill • The customer signs an authorization form to allow the business to deduct funds from the account each billing period. • Consumers are responsible for frequently checking their account to ensure that the correct amount was withdrawn. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Payroll Cards • Payroll cards offer an alternative to 1. 7. 2. G 1 Payroll Cards • Payroll cards offer an alternative to printing and mailing a paycheck to employees. • Payroll cards function in a similar way as debit cards. • These reloadable cards are often linked to a credit card company, allowing employee’s to withdraw money from the ATM or to purchase goods and services through a POS. • Employers use payroll cards as an alternative to printing and sending paychecks. • Consumers must be aware that payroll cards are not linked to a depository institution account. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Check 21 • Check Clearing for the 21 st 1. 7. 2. G 1 Check 21 • Check Clearing for the 21 st Century Act (Check 21) Transfers checks electronically. • This eliminates most or all float time. • Float time is the time between writing the check to when the money is withdrawn from the depository institution account. • Check 21 has made is possible for writing a check to be processed as quickly as using a debit card. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Pay by Phone • Pay by Phone system allows 1. 7. 2. G 1 Pay by Phone • Pay by Phone system allows the consumer to call a vendor with instructions to pay certain bills or to electronically transfer funds between accounts. • A written agreement between the consumer and the institution must be in place for a transaction to occur. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Review • Benefits include 24 -hour access and convenience. 1. 7. 2. G 1 Review • Benefits include 24 -hour access and convenience. • Debit cards offer the benefits of a credit card without building debt. • Direct deposits offer convenience to customers who have checks directly deposited into their account automatically. • Direct payment allows bills to be paid electronically. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Lesson Objectives – Review – Describe 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Lesson Objectives – Review – Describe electronic banking – Define the different types of electronic banking – Understand how to safely use an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) and debit card © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona

1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Assignment: – Electronic Banking worksheet 1. 1. 7. 2. G 1 Electronic Banking • Assignment: – Electronic Banking worksheet 1. 7. 2. A 1 © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised February 2008 – Financial Institutions Unit – Electronic Banking Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona