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Week 4: Instructional Design & Web. Quests Week 4: Instructional Design & Web. Quests

Plan for Today • • Assignment #1 Reading Response #1 Today’s Reading Search Strategies Plan for Today • • Assignment #1 Reading Response #1 Today’s Reading Search Strategies Instructional Design Basics Introduction to Web. Quests Work in groups to explore and rate Web. Quests

A Small Request… In future, when you upload Reading Responses or Assignments to Turn. A Small Request… In future, when you upload Reading Responses or Assignments to Turn. It. In: Include your own name in both the filename and in the body of the file itself (Just think…I wind up with many files called “Reading Response #1” on my desktop!)

Researching Researching

Pertinent Searches • What is a scholarly journal? http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchhelp/publicationtypes/periodicaltypes. h Pertinent Searches • What is a scholarly journal? http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchhelp/publicationtypes/periodicaltypes. h tm • What’s ERIC? http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchhelp/subjectguides/educ/ERIC. ht m • To access ERIC http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchtools/databases/dbofdb. htm? Database. I D=374

How do we find useful information? • Often, someone else passes it on to How do we find useful information? • Often, someone else passes it on to us • Other times, we need to carry out an active search • At least three strategies can be used in search – Keyword searches – Following links or references – Referring to a trusted authority • Which strategy you start with depends on how much you know about what you’re looking for • Most of the time we combine strategies

Online resources • Search engine watch – http: //searchenginewatch. com/ • Evaluating websites – Online resources • Search engine watch – http: //searchenginewatch. com/ • Evaluating websites – http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchtools/internetse arch/webevaluation. htm

Search Engines • List of major search engines – http: //searchenginewatch. com/links/major. html – Search Engines • List of major search engines – http: //searchenginewatch. com/links/major. html – http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/researchtools/internetsear ch/index. htm

Search Engines • Basic techniques – Boolean searches (+/-) (and/or/and not) • +Saturn – Search Engines • Basic techniques – Boolean searches (+/-) (and/or/and not) • +Saturn – car • Saturn and not car (i. e. Alta vista advanced search) • (car or automobile or vehicle) and (buy or purchase) and used – Quotations for words side-by-side • “global warming” – Asterisk (*) • math*

Some handy tips • Whenever possible, use nouns and objects as keywords – EXAMPLE: Some handy tips • Whenever possible, use nouns and objects as keywords – EXAMPLE: fiesta dinnerware plates cups saucers • Put most important terms first in your keyword list; to ensure that they will be searched, put a +sign in front of each one – EXAMPLE: +hybrid +electric +gas +vehicles • Use at least three keywords in your query – EXAMPLE: interaction vitamins drugs • Combine keywords, whenever possible, into phrases – EXAMPLE: "search engine tutorial” • Avoid common words, e. g. , water, unless they're part of a phrase – EXAMPLE: "bottled water”

ERIC • The world's largest source of education information • The database contains more ERIC • The world's largest source of education information • The database contains more than 1 million abstracts of education-related documents (including reports, conference presentations, lesson plans) and journal articles, dating from 1966 • ERIC updates the database monthly, ensuring that the information you receive is timely and accurate. • Many documents are available directly through ERIC, or can be found elsewhere with ERIC’s reference data. • Get to it through http: //www. lib. sfu. ca/

Sample ERIC Search Sample ERIC Search

Instructional Design Basics Instructional Design Basics

Instructional design • Definition – A set of systematic procedures for developing teaching materials Instructional design • Definition – A set of systematic procedures for developing teaching materials and setting up learning environments – Links theory with practice in designing effective instruction – Example: a cookbook • There are numerous instructional design models

Instructional Design Models • Simplest model: ADDIE Instructional Design Models • Simplest model: ADDIE

More about ID models • ACPDDIE: Analyse, Create, Personalise, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate More about ID models • ACPDDIE: Analyse, Create, Personalise, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate Resources • ADDIE: http: //www. personal. psu. edu/faculty/s/j/sjm 256/portfolio/kbase/ IDD/ADDIE. pdf • Mc. Griff’s pages on ADDIE, Dick & Carey’s, and Kemp’s Models http: //www. personal. psu. edu/faculty/s/j/sjm 256/portfolio/kbase/ IDD/ISDModels. html

Writing Objectives Specific (expected behaviour/action stated clearly) Measurable (outcome tied to the assessment) Acceptable Writing Objectives Specific (expected behaviour/action stated clearly) Measurable (outcome tied to the assessment) Acceptable (to student and instructor) Realistic Time-bound (completed within a timeframe) ________ Behaviour Conditions Criteria

Wording “After this unit/lesson/etc. you will be able to: ” (Learner focused). Suggested verbs: Wording “After this unit/lesson/etc. you will be able to: ” (Learner focused). Suggested verbs: Bloom’s taxonomy See: http: //www. acoem. org/education/jointsponsor/ Learning%20 Objectives. pdf

Resources • • Bloom’s Taxonomy – http: //www. coun. uvic. ca/learn/program/hndouts/bloom. html General Guidelines Resources • • Bloom’s Taxonomy – http: //www. coun. uvic. ca/learn/program/hndouts/bloom. html General Guidelines – http: //www. glencoe. com/sec/teachingtoday/downloads/pdf/objective_state ments. pdf – http: //www. nwlink. com/~donclark/hrd/templates/objectivetool. html Writing Learning Objectives for Unit/Lesson Plans – http: //www. harding. edu/USER/dlee/WWW/objectives. doc More (detailed) info – http: //med. fsu. edu/education/Faculty. Development/PDF/writingobjectives. pdf

Web. Quests Web. Quests

Why Web. Quests? • Originated with Dr. Bernie Dodge in 1995. • Based on Why Web. Quests? • Originated with Dr. Bernie Dodge in 1995. • Based on the concern that K-12 students spent far too much time searching the web, and not enough time thinking about, or thinking with, what they find. • “Web. Quest” – specific kind of web page – usually built by a teacher – design focuses on helping students use particular web-based (or other) materials as resources – for problem-solving • Enormously popular!

Parts of a Web. Quest • Introduction – The “hook”, often a fictional scenario Parts of a Web. Quest • Introduction – The “hook”, often a fictional scenario or “cover story” • Task – What do students need to do (produce)? Often involves playing a specific role in a life-like scenario • Process – Guidance on how to approach the task, with pointers to necessary resources and (sometimes) advice or hints on how to organize and think about these • Evaluation – How will students’ performance on the task be evaluated? • Conclusion – Helps students understand what they have accomplished and how it might be extended

Web. Quest Resources • Web. Quest building blocks and examples http: //projects. edtech. sandi. Web. Quest Resources • Web. Quest building blocks and examples http: //projects. edtech. sandi. net/staffdev/b uildingblocks/p-index. htm • Create a task rubric http: //webquest. sdsu. edu/rubrics. h tml • Reading and training materials http: //webquest. sdsu. edu/materials. htm

Web. Quest Activity: Groups Divide into Groups: 4 people per group • Elementary • Web. Quest Activity: Groups Divide into Groups: 4 people per group • Elementary • Grades 3 -4 • Grades 6 -8 • HS English • HS Math/Science • HS Humanities

Activity Instructions • Go to: http: //webquest. sdsu. edu/materials. htm • Under A Web. Activity Instructions • Go to: http: //webquest. sdsu. edu/materials. htm • Under A Web. Quest about Web. Quests, select “Elementary” or “Middle and High School” depending on your group. • Take 10 minutes to read the instructions and organize your group • Individually, spend up to 7 minutes on each site to complete your worksheet (35 minutes max. ) • Regroup and answer the questions as a group. Make sure you have someone recording and ready to report out (25 minutes max. Let David know when you’re done) • Larger group discussion