The Department of Computer Science at Columbia University

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The Department of Computer Science at Columbia University Henning Schulzrinne, Chair Dept. of Computer The Department of Computer Science at Columbia University Henning Schulzrinne, Chair Dept. of Computer Science Columbia University 2004 CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia Computer Science in Numbers n ~33 full-time faculty and lecturers n n 110 Columbia Computer Science in Numbers n ~33 full-time faculty and lecturers n n 110 Ph. D students (~20 new arrivals) 170 MS students (75 new arrivals) 170 CS undergraduate majors n n + visitors, postdocs, adjunct faculty, joint appointments (EE, IEOR), … + 40 computer engineering students About 16 administrative staff n 5 system administrators CS orientation - Fall 2004

Faculty: 34 (31 tenure track, 3 lecturers) + 3 joint Aho Allen Grinspun Gross Faculty: 34 (31 tenure track, 3 lecturers) + 3 joint Aho Allen Grinspun Gross Cannon Carloni Edwards Feiner Grunschlag Hirschberg Jebara Kaiser Kender Keromytis Malkin Ross Rubenstein Schulzrinne Unger Wozniakowski Yannakakis Belhumeur Mc. Keown Misra Nayar Nieh Nowick Ramamoorthi Servedio Shortliffe Sklar Stolfo Stein Traub CS orientation - Fall 2004 Galil Gravano Yemini

Research Interacting with Humans the Physical World (7) (10) Making Sense of Data (9) Research Interacting with Humans the Physical World (7) (10) Making Sense of Data (9) Computer Science Theory (8) Designing Digital Systems (4) CS orientation - Fall 2004 Systems (10)

Research areas graphics, robotics, vision Interacting with the Physical World Allen, Belhumeur, Feiner, Grinspun, Research areas graphics, robotics, vision Interacting with the Physical World Allen, Belhumeur, Feiner, Grinspun, Grunschlag, Jebara, Kender, Nayar, Ramamoorthi, Sklar Interacting with Humans user interfaces, natural language and speech processing, collaborative work, personalized agents Feiner, Hirschberg, Kaiser, Kender, Mc. Keown, Sklar Systems networks, distributed systems, security, compilers, software engineering, programming languages, OS Aho, Edwards, Kaiser, Keromytis, Malkin, Misra, Nieh, Schulzrinne, Stolfo, Yemini Designing Digital Systems digital and VLSI design, CAD, asynchronous circuits, embedded systems Carloni, Edwards, Nowick, Unger Making Sense of Data databases, data mining, Web search, machine learning applications Cannon, Gravano, Jebara, Kaiser, Ross, Servedio, Stolfo Computer Science Theory cryptography, quantum computing, complexity, machine learning theory, graph theory, algorithms Aho, Galil, Gross, Malkin, Servedio, Traub, Wozniakowski, Yannakakis CS orientation - Fall 2004

CLASS: A Research Center in CS n The Center for Computational Learning Systems (CLASS) CLASS: A Research Center in CS n The Center for Computational Learning Systems (CLASS) aims to be a world leader in learning and data mining research and the application of this research to natural language understanding, the World Wide Web, bioinformatics, systems security and other emerging areas. CLASS will emphasize interdisciplinary efforts with other departments at Columbia, and will leverage Columbia's CS Department's strengths in learning, data mining and natural language processing, extending the effective size and scope of the Department's research effort. CS orientation - Fall 2004

Anatomy of a research group n Typically, each faculty heads a research group consisting Anatomy of a research group n Typically, each faculty heads a research group consisting of n n 1 faculty sometimes 1 -2 postdocs research visitors (industry, sabbatical) 1 to 10 Ph. D and MS graduate research assistants n n a number of undergraduate and MS project students n n typical: 5 COMS 3998, 4901, 6901 sometimes an administrative assistant (AA) CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia research economics 101 n For each GRA, a faculty needs to attract roughly Columbia research economics 101 n For each GRA, a faculty needs to attract roughly $60 k for 12 months, $48 k for 9 months n n n 12*$2, 226 = $26. 7 k stipend $15, 130 for tuition $1, 000 for computing support 61% overhead (on almost everything except tuition, including equipment and travel) University only pays 9 months of faculty salary n summer salary needs to be funded out of grants CS orientation - Fall 2004

Participating in research n n n Take 4000 or 6000 -level classes MS: take Participating in research n n n Take 4000 or 6000 -level classes MS: take 4901 or 6901 project course with faculty MS: do 15 -credit thesis 4995 and 6998 are “topics” courses often offered only once, on research topic of local faculty or adjunct from local research labs (IBM, Bell Labs, …) Attend departmental talks n n typically, Mo or We, 11— 12. 30 faculty talks (research summaries), invited distinguished speakers and faculty candidates (spring) Attend research group talks in vision/robotics, networking, theory, … Participate in research group meetings n n often, students and visitors discussing current research sometimes pizza CS orientation - Fall 2004

Social life in CUCS n n Departmental BBQ in fall and spring CS@25 celebration Social life in CUCS n n Departmental BBQ in fall and spring [email protected] celebration on Oct. 21 -23 Coffee hour on Thursdays at 4 pm in CS lounge Activities organized by ACM, Department and graduate school n n roughly once a month Movie nights in lounge CS orientation - Fall 2004

Volunteering or How to Become a Czar(ina) n n Department needs your help to Volunteering or How to Become a Czar(ina) n n Department needs your help to make it a nice place to study and work Volunteer positions include n n n n webmaster photo czar space czar copier czar help with departmental BBQ grad student representative ACM Contact Ph. D representative (Knarig Arabshian, Edward Ishak) for details CS orientation - Fall 2004

Student groups n Women in Computer Science (WICS) n n http: //www. cs. columbia. Student groups n Women in Computer Science (WICS) n n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/wics/ ACM n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/acm/ CS orientation - Fall 2004

Faculty to know n Prof. Gail Kaiser n n Prof. Yechiam Yemini n n Faculty to know n Prof. Gail Kaiser n n Prof. Yechiam Yemini n n Ph. D program director ([email protected]) MS program director ([email protected]) Prof. Betsy Sklar n TA issues ([email protected]) CS orientation - Fall 2004

Important people to know: staff n Alice Cueba n n Simon Bird, Remi Moss, Important people to know: staff n Alice Cueba n n Simon Bird, Remi Moss, Twinkle Edwards n n budgets and finances, e. g. , travel reimbursements Elias Tesfaye n n department administrator: swipe card problems, GRA appointments Patricia Hervey n n graduate program and records Mary van Starrex n n receptionist: mail, fax, packages keys, purchase orders Daisy Nguyen n CRF (Computing Research Facility): heads systems support (sys admin) group CS orientation - Fall 2004

MICE (Managing Information in Computer Scienc. E) n n https: //www. cs. columbia. edu/mice MICE (Managing Information in Computer Scienc. E) n n https: //www. cs. columbia. edu/mice Services: n n n Find people and their contact information, office hours Select MS advisor Track your MS and Ph. D progress: courses, publications, exams, community service n n n Ph. D Black Friday Get notified of packages and faxes Jobs (posting and listings) Equipment tracking for research groups You will get password once you obtain a CS account n n but different password! if you forget password, MICE will send you a new one CS orientation - Fall 2004

MICE CS orientation - Fall 2004 MICE CS orientation - Fall 2004

Getting into the building n n n Need to get swipe card access enabled Getting into the building n n n Need to get swipe card access enabled to get access to CEPSR and CS building Apply in MICE (under “Access”) Some labs have keys contact your advisor for details CS orientation - Fall 2004

Ph. D student resources n n n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~phdczar Program details Ph. D student resources n n n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~phdczar Program details Hints on writing and other “how to succeed in graduate school” items CS orientation - Fall 2004

Projects (MS) n Can do research projects with most faculty n n n n Projects (MS) n Can do research projects with most faculty n n n n CS 4901, 6901 Usually, unpaid (but there are exceptions) Good way to get to know a research area and faculty ( recommendation letters…) One (typically) or two semesters in length May lead to publication or CS technical report 1 -6 credits, with 3 typical Should be equivalent to one or two courses in effort, e. g. , 9 hours/week for 3 -credit project CS orientation - Fall 2004

Research groups n n Sampling of research groups in department Sampling from … n Research groups n n Sampling of research groups in department Sampling from … n n n Graphics, robotics, vision Agent systems Networks and distributed systems Digital Systems Databases Theory CS orientation - Fall 2004

3 -D Site Modeling Computer Aided Robotic Crystal Mounting Surgery CS orientation - Fall 3 -D Site Modeling Computer Aided Robotic Crystal Mounting Surgery CS orientation - Fall 2004 Graspit! Simulator Mobile Robotics

Prof. Peter Allen Current Projects: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 3 -D Modeling: Combining Prof. Peter Allen Current Projects: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 3 -D Modeling: Combining laser scanning and computer vision to create photorealistic models. Current NSF ITR project includes scanning Beauvais Cathedral in France and ancient ruins in Sicily Robotic and human hand simulation using our Graspit! simulator which includes full dynamics, grasp quality measures, and grasp learning Microscale protein crystal mounting using visual control. Microscope camera used to track/pick up very small crystals for x-ray diffraction AVENUE mobile scanning robot: automating the site modeling process using GPS, wireless network, computer vision and range scanning New insertable stereo cameras with pan, tilt and translation for minimallyinvasive surgery • • People: Postdocs: Atanas Georgiev and Andrew Miller GRA’s: Paul Blaer, Alejandro Troccoli, Ben Smith • M. S. : Rafi Pelosoff, Alex Haubald CS orientation - Fall 2004

Goal: Creating intelligent machines and systems Collaborative Research: Currently working with: • Molecular Biology Goal: Creating intelligent machines and systems Collaborative Research: Currently working with: • Molecular Biology (crystal mounting) • Art History (3 D Modeling) • Biomechanics (human hand simulation) • Surgery (next-generation surgical imaging) One of the labs affiliated with CVGC (Columbia Vision and Graphics Center) Research opportunities include a wide range of software, hardware and systems projects. Expertise in robotics, graphics, or vision is helpful CS orientation - Fall 2004

Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab S. Feiner, B. Bell, H. Benko, G. Blaskó, Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab S. Feiner, B. Bell, H. Benko, G. Blaskó, S. Güven, D. Hallaway, E. Ishak, S. Lok, T. Okuma, A. Olwal, T. Zhou n n n Wearable UIs Augmented reality Virtual reality CS orientation - Fall 2004

Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab S. Feiner, B. Bell, H. Benko, G. Blaskó, Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab S. Feiner, B. Bell, H. Benko, G. Blaskó, S. Güven, D. Hallaway, E. Ishak, S. Lok, T. Okuma, A. Olwal, T. Zhou n n n Automated generation of graphics Display layout Coordination with text generation CS orientation - Fall 2004

Prof. Elizabeth Sklar's Agents Lab http: //agents. columbia. edu • Relationship learning in humans Prof. Elizabeth Sklar's Agents Lab http: //agents. columbia. edu • Relationship learning in humans and learning in agents (both virtual and embodied) • Ways in which these can co-evolve: learn from each other, by interacting • Learning in humans = • Learning in agents = discovering ways in which virtual and embodied agents can learn by interacting with each other, with humans and • Virtual agents help humans learn by acting as learning partners, adapting behavior based on its interactions with human users. • Embodied agents help humans learn by providing a hands-on means for experiencing technology through educational robots Robo. Cup. Junior (LEGO Mindstorms). with their environment… • Virtual agents learn in simulation by interacting with each other and by sensing data inputs; a primary focus is on mechanism design. • Embodied agents learn in real-time by interacting with humans, with the environment and with virtual agents (Sony Aibo). CS orientation - Fall 2004

Prof. Tony Jebara Risi Kondor Andrew Howard Anshul Kundaje Darrin Lewis www. cs. columbia. Prof. Tony Jebara Risi Kondor Andrew Howard Anshul Kundaje Darrin Lewis www. cs. columbia. edu/learning w 1 w 2 w 3 w 4 s 1 s 2 s 3 s 4 a 1 a 2 a 3 a 4 CS orientation - Fall 2004

Topics Support Vector Machines and Kernel Methods q* x q’ x qx Representation Learning Topics Support Vector Machines and Kernel Methods q* x q’ x qx Representation Learning CS orientation - Fall 2004

Topics Computer Vision, Tracking People and Understanding Video Discriminative Graphical Models CS orientation - Topics Computer Vision, Tracking People and Understanding Video Discriminative Graphical Models CS orientation - Fall 2004

Gail Kaiser: Programming Systems Lab n Main research goal: Develop methodologies and technologies to Gail Kaiser: Programming Systems Lab n Main research goal: Develop methodologies and technologies to aid teams working together on large scale software engineering projects and other business, education and social endeavors n n n n n Ph. D Students: Jean-Denis Greze Rean Griffith Phil Gross Suhit Gupta Gaurav Kc Janak Parekh Dan Phung Alpa Shah Peppo Valetto Details at http: //www. psl. cs. columbia. edu CS orientation - Fall 2004

Gail Kaiser: Programming Systems Lab n Main topics: autonomic computing (self-healing applications & systems), Gail Kaiser: Programming Systems Lab n Main topics: autonomic computing (self-healing applications & systems), collaborative work, team-oriented user interfaces (from large screens to PDAs), security, Web-based information management, applied AI, software development environments and tools n n n Seeking MS project students interested in: Publish/subscribe contentbased event systems Complex event correlation for autonomic computing and security applications Applications of machine learning to context-based individual & collaborative work Extensions of XML and Web Service technologies for collaborative computing Details at http: //www. psl. cs. columbia. edu CS orientation - Fall 2004

Networking research at Columbia University n n n Columbia Networking Research Center spans EE Networking research at Columbia University n n n Columbia Networking Research Center spans EE + CS 15 faculty – one of the largest networking research groups in the US about 40 Ph. Ds spanning optical networks to operating systems and applications theory (performance analysis) to systems (software, protocols) CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab (Sal Stolfo) n Attackers continue to improve techniques undeterred – Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab (Sal Stolfo) n Attackers continue to improve techniques undeterred – n n n Present COTS security defenses are porous and suffer from the false negative problem There is no one monolithic security solution; security is a design criteria at all layers of the stack Behavior-based computer security will substantially raise the bar Columbia conducts a broad spectrum of research related to securing critical infrastructure in close collaboration with industry and government with attention to practical and deployable results Visit: http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/faculty n n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/ids http: //www. sysd. com CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab: Email Misuse and Stealthy Surveillance n Malicious Email Tracking n Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab: Email Misuse and Stealthy Surveillance n Malicious Email Tracking n n n Email Mining Toolkit n n Forensic analysis of email logs for profile and model generation Comparison of profiles/models Detect malicious users/groups and aliases Surveillance Detector n n An online tool for detecting new viruses, SPAM and misuse Behavior-based detection of “abnormal” traffic Orders of magnitude improvements over COTS IDS scan/probe detection Deployed externally by System Detection, Inc. CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab Projects n Goals: n n Advance the state of the Columbia Intrusion Detection Lab Projects n Goals: n n Advance the state of the art in Intrusion Detection and Prevention using Machine Learning technology Why? Current IDS detect what is known, they do not detect was is new until damage has already been done. n n Scale up to high bandwidth analysis Reduce False Positive rate Increase security analyst productivity Student Lab Projects n n n Teams of Graduate students working with ugrads develop algorithms, test environments, and perform careful experiments Weekly and bi-weekly meetings where all team members present their work Several undergrads have co-authored papers, two having won best paper awards, and two undergrads have won honorable mention awards from the National Computer Association CS orientation - Fall 2004

Network Computing Laboratory http: //www. ncl. cs. columbia. edu n n n Operating Systems Network Computing Laboratory http: //www. ncl. cs. columbia. edu n n n Operating Systems Distributed Systems Scheduling and Resource Management Thin-Client and Network Computing Web and Multimedia Systems Performance Evaluation CS orientation - Fall 2004

Network Computing Laboratory Recent Research Projects n n n Zap: Transparent process migration VNAT: Network Computing Laboratory Recent Research Projects n n n Zap: Transparent process migration VNAT: Mobile networking GR 3: O(1) proportional share scheduling Thinc: WAN remote display protocol Certes: Inferring web client response times CS orientation - Fall 2004

Network Computing Laboratory n n n MS research projects available for 4000 level and Network Computing Laboratory n n n MS research projects available for 4000 level and 6000 -level course credit Bi-weekly systems seminar lunch meetings Information: Prof. Jason Nieh ([email protected] columbia. edu) CS orientation - Fall 2004

Tal Malkin: Cryptography n n Crypto group Theory group Secure Systems Lab Crypto = Tal Malkin: Cryptography n n Crypto group Theory group Secure Systems Lab Crypto = construct computation and communication efficient schemes maintaining desired functionality even in adversarial environment n n (e. g. , public key encryption, secure computation, authentication, contract signing, voting, e-commerce, …) Motivation and Goals security, privacy, social, financial, political needs Solutions rigorous, theoretical approach Research themes: n n Definitions (identify, conceptualize, formalize goals) Protocol design (efficiency and provable security) Foundations (complexity, assumptions, limits) Search for both positive and negative results CS orientation - Fall 2004

Tal Malkin: Examples of Research Topics n n n Protecting against temporal or partial Tal Malkin: Examples of Research Topics n n n Protecting against temporal or partial key exposure: key-evolving (e. g. , forward-secure) schemes to mitigate damage of key leakage. Protecting against key manipulation or tampering attacks: algorithmic defense against physical attacks on keying material. Private information retrieval: keep user’s interests private even from database holder. Relations among cryptographic primitives: reductions and oracle separations; minimal assumptions for cryptographic tasks. Secure computation of approximations, completeness for multi-party computation, multicast encryption, anonymous routing, intrusion detection, steganography, … For more information: take crypto class this fall, contact Prof. Malkin, check out http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~tal CS orientation - Fall 2004

Network Security Lab Director: Prof. Angelos D. Keromytis angelos@cs. columbia. edu Applied research in Network Security Lab Director: Prof. Angelos D. Keromytis [email protected] columbia. edu Applied research in security, networking, operating systems Efficient cryptographic mechanisms/protocols Denial of service Software security Network viruses/worms n Currently 5 graduate students (Cook, Locasto, Burnside, Stavrou, Hu) Several "affiliated" (Kc, Sidiroglou, Channing) http: //nsl. cs. columbia. edu/ n CS orientation - Fall 2004

NSL Projects n Network Worm Vaccine n n Software Randomization n n New OS NSL Projects n Network Worm Vaccine n n Software Randomization n n New OS architecture - remove memory and CPU from data path Efficient Cryptography n n Graphical Turing Tests combined with Secure Overlay Services to provide resilient services High-speed I/O: The Operating System As a Signaling Mechanism n n Protection against injected code Resilience Against Denial of Service Attacks n n Limit worm infection rate via anomaly detection engine and automatic patching of vulnerable software Design and implementation of ciphers for specific environments - use of graphics cards, variable size block ciphers, IXP processor Collaborative Distributed Intrusion Detection n Identifying global attack activity as well as “low and slow” scans via shared intrusion alerts across administrative domains CS orientation - Fall 2004

IRT real-time laboratory (IRT) http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/IRT n Internet multimedia protocols and IRT real-time laboratory (IRT) http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/IRT n Internet multimedia protocols and systems n n Wireless and ad-hoc networks Quality of service n n Internet telephony signaling and services Ubiquitous communication multicast, scalable data plane signaling, … Service discovery and location-based services Content distribution networks DOS prevention and traceback CS orientation - Fall 2004

IRT Projects & group meetings n n Projects available in multimedia systems, location-based services IRT Projects & group meetings n n Projects available in multimedia systems, location-based services and related topics Weekly research group talks (Tuesday, 6 pm) open to project students CS orientation - Fall 2004

Asynchronous Circuits & Systems Group http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~nowick http: // n n Asynchronous Circuits & Systems Group http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~nowick http: // n n Prof. Steven Nowick ([email protected] columbia. edu) Research in clockless digital systems n n Most digital systems are synchronous = have a global clock Potential benefits of asynchronous systems: n n Modular “plug-and-play” design: assemble components, no global timing concerns Low power: no burning of clock power, components only activated on demand High speed: not restricted by fixed clock speed Challenges: new techniques needed n n New “CAD” (computer-aided design) software tools to aid designers New circuit design styles CS orientation - Fall 2004

Asynchronous Circuits & Systems Group n CAD Tools: n n Circuit Designs: n n Asynchronous Circuits & Systems Group n CAD Tools: n n Circuit Designs: n n Software tools + optimization algorithms Allow automated ‘push-button’ circuit synthesis + optimization For individual controllers (state machines), for entire systems (processors) New techniques to design asynchronous circuits (adders, multipliers) Interface circuits: for mixing synchronous + asynchronous subsystems Very high-speed pipelines: several Giga. Hertz Group Meeting (tentatively): Weds. 5: 30 -7: 00 pm (CS 4 th floor conf. room) – contact Prof. Nowick CS orientation - Fall 2004

Columbia’s Database Group http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/database n Faculty Luis Gravano Ken Ross Columbia’s Database Group http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/database n Faculty Luis Gravano Ken Ross n Ph. D. Students Eugene Agichtein Wisam Dakka Panos Ipeirotis Amélie Marian Jingren Zhou • Weekly group meetings; all welcome • Contact [email protected] columbia. edu or [email protected] columbia. edu if interested in attending CS orientation - Fall 2004

Some Projects in Gravano’s “Subgroup” http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~gravano n n n Snowball, Some Projects in Gravano’s “Subgroup” http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~gravano n n n Snowball, an information-extraction system http: //snowball. cs. columbia. edu QProber, a system for classifying and searching “hidden-web” text databases http: //qprober. cs. columbia. edu SDARTS, a protocol and toolkit for metasearching http: //sdarts. columbia. edu RANK: “top-k” query processing http: //rank. cs. columbia. edu PERSIVAL, personalized search and summarization over multimedia information http: //persival. cs. columbia. edu For-credit research projects available; contact [email protected] columbia. edu CS orientation - Fall 2004

Theory Group Activities n n Profs. Malkin, Servedio, Stein Weekly seminar/reading group http: //www Theory Group Activities n n Profs. Malkin, Servedio, Stein Weekly seminar/reading group http: //www 1. cs. columbia. edu/~tal/theoryread. html CS orientation - Fall 2004

Quantum Computation n Profs. Wozniakowski, Traub, Aho Weekly seminar, to be announced to department Quantum Computation n Profs. Wozniakowski, Traub, Aho Weekly seminar, to be announced to department Projects available CS orientation - Fall 2004

Quantum Computing n Motivation Moore's Law, which has held for some 40 years, states Quantum Computing n Motivation Moore's Law, which has held for some 40 years, states that the number of elements on a chip doubles about every 18 months. In 10 -15 years, features will be about the size of an atom and current silicon technologies will no longer track Moore's Law. Quantum computing is one of the possible future technologies. CS orientation - Fall 2004

Quantum Computing Research n n n If physicists can build quantum computers, what are Quantum Computing Research n n n If physicists can build quantum computers, what are the killer applications? How much more powerful is a quantum computer than a classical computer; that is, compare quantum computational complexity with classical complexity. How should compilers for quantum computers be constructed? CS orientation - Fall 2004

People involved in QC Research n Faculty and Researchers n n n Students n People involved in QC Research n Faculty and Researchers n n n Students n Al Aho Anargyros Papageorgiou Rocco Servedio Joseph Traub Henryk Wozniakowski n n CS orientation - Fall 2004 Alp Atici Arvid Bessen Eden Yian Chee Hoo Marek Kwas Krysta Svore

Background for Quantum Computing To work on quantum computing you must know: n n Background for Quantum Computing To work on quantum computing you must know: n n n Linear algebra Basics of quantum computing Knowledge of quantum mechanics is useful but not necessary CS orientation - Fall 2004

To learn more about QC n n Linear Algebra, CS 3251, offered Fall 2003 To learn more about QC n n Linear Algebra, CS 3251, offered Fall 2003 Introduction to Quantum Computing - new course to be offered Spring 2004 Weekly seminar on quantum computing - Fall 2003 - time and place TBA For information on the Columbia-MIT project on quantum computing see http: //quantum. cs. columbia. edu CS orientation - Fall 2004

Rocco Servedio: Theory of Computing http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~rocco Main research goal: design Rocco Servedio: Theory of Computing http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~rocco Main research goal: design and analyze provably correct and efficient learning algorithms for interesting and important classes of functions AND OR OR + OR AND ……………. . AND ……………………. x 1 xn Boolean formulas + ++ v 4 + - - - -- geometric concepts CS orientation - Fall 2004 v 2 v 1 0 v 6 1 v 3 v 2 0 1 0 0 decision trees 1

Rocco Servedio: Theory of Computing n n Main approach: explore & exploit connections between Rocco Servedio: Theory of Computing n n Main approach: explore & exploit connections between computational learning theory and other areas of CS theory Complexity theory: representation schemes studied in complexity theory (Fourier representations, polynomial threshold functions) are useful for learning Cryptography: basis for robust hardness results for learning problems Quantum computation: quantum algorithms can efficiently solve learning problems which classical algorithms provably cannot CS orientation - Fall 2004

Registration Hints n n MS/Ph. D students should register for 15 points exactly. Up Registration Hints n n MS/Ph. D students should register for 15 points exactly. Up to 6 points, in very rare cases up to 9 points, should be in regular courses (4000 or 6000 level only), with the rest in E 9911 Graduate Research II (ignore E 9910 Graduate Research I). Ph. D students (post-MS) should register for one RU. No points are necessary, unless taking regular courses (4000 or 6000 level). Again, usually at most 6 and rarely up to 9 points in regular courses. MS GRAs must consult with their faculty advisors before registering, for 12 -15 points, in most cases restricted to max 6 points in regular courses and the rest in some combination of 6900/6901/6902. Get faculty advisor approval for all regular course registrations! n Ph. D students without advisors should contact Prof. Kaiser ([email protected] columbia. edu) CS orientation - Fall 2004

CRF (Computing Research Facilities) http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~crf/ n n Director: Daisy Nguyen CRF (Computing Research Facilities) http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~crf/ n n Director: Daisy Nguyen Senior system administrator n n n Mark Yeun Dennis Shim Primary support system administrator n n Sarmistha (“Manu”) Dutta Anupam Mohanty (“Sonu”) CS orientation - Fall 2004

CRF supports Deskt ops: n Windows n Linux n dual boot Windows + Linux CRF supports Deskt ops: n Windows n Linux n dual boot Windows + Linux n Solaris on Sun workstations n we do not support Macs Servers: n file servers (NFS, Samba) n mail (IMAP, POP, Unix mail) n DNS n web n print services n Sun and Linux research servers n Windows Domain Controller n SMS Mail readers: n pine, mh, Netscape, Mail, mail, mulberry, etc. Software: n Matlab, Mathematica, Splus, CVS, Acrobat Reader, Distiller, ghostview, Winzip, MS Office, Virus checker, ssh, X environment, Emacs, etc. CS orientation - Fall 2004

CRF systems mail server web NIS Linux compute server diamond Research Machines flame dynasty CRF systems mail server web NIS Linux compute server diamond Research Machines flame dynasty cluster-pc Domain Controller Solaris cluster disco DNS play RAID file servers CS orientation - Fall 2004 SMS

CUCS Computer Labs and Facilities n Compute servers for remote login (ssh): n n CUCS Computer Labs and Facilities n Compute servers for remote login (ssh): n n n cluster (Solaris) cluster-pc (Linux) No VPN needed – just use ssh CRF does not offer modem dial-in use Columbia facilities or commercial ISP Two laboratories for classes and projects: n CLIC (CSB 486) n n MRL (across from receptionist) n n 30 Linux workstations 30 Windows 2000 workstations Teaching laboratory for networks n n INTEREST lab routers, nodes, Ethernet switches CS orientation - Fall 2004

Contacting CRF n Send request (“ticket”) to crf@cs. columbia. edu Check status of tickets Contacting CRF n Send request (“ticket”) to [email protected] columbia. edu Check status of tickets on CRF web page: n Normal ticket: daily requests n http: //www. cs. columbia. edu/~crf n n Urgent ticket: requests that need attention ASAP n n n install new software or machine non-critical software or hardware problems send ticket, will get response and updates your machine is down send ticket, then call CRF Emergency ticket: n n mail down power lost entire computing system down call us immediately anytime CS orientation - Fall 2004

CRF contact information Hotline (working hours): x 7174 Daisy: x 7140, x 7039, 347 CRF contact information Hotline (working hours): x 7174 Daisy: x 7140, x 7039, 347 -782 -2345 (cell), 908 -286 -1139 (home) Mark: x 7036, 917 -449 -4139 (cell) Dennis: x 7035, 646 -286 -9769 (cell) Manu: x 7034, 973 -713 -7583 (cell) Sonu: x 7032, 917 -538 -5909 (cell) CS orientation - Fall 2004




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